2022 First-Class Forever Stamp,Women's Rowing

# 5694-97 - 2022 First-Class Forever Stamp - Women's Rowing

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US #5694-97
2022 Women’s Rowing

  • Commemorates women’s rowing


Stamp Category: 
Commemorative
Value:  58¢ First Class Mail Rate (Forever)
First Day of Issue:  May 13, 2022
First Day City:  Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Quantity Issued:  18,000,000
Printed by:  Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd.
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Panes of 20
Tagging:  Nonphosphored type III, block tag

Why the stamps were issued:  To celebrate women’s rowing and its history.

About the stamp design:  Includes four different stamp designs on a pane of 20.  The artwork covers the entire pane, picturing five, 8-person rowing teams on the water.  The eight rowers face left, with a ninth person (the coxswain) in the selvage of each boat facing the opposite direction.  The stamps picture artwork by Nancy Stahl.

First Day City:  The First Day of Issue Ceremony was held at the Philadelphia Girls’ Rowing Club in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

History the stamp represents:  Women’s rowing began in the early 19th century.  However, due to gender stereotypes, women’s races were few and far between.  It wasn’t until the 20th century that things really took off.

During the Victorian era, it was believed certain activities were too strenuous for a woman’s health.  One such activity was rowing.  Even when women were allowed to participate, they had to wear cumbersome outfits (including stiff corsets), which restricted their movements.  The only competitions that included women were informal ones between local club teams.  This began to change with the first national events in the early 1900s and the first international events in the 1950s.  Still, it wasn’t until 1976 that women’s rowing events were added to the Olympics, though the distance was only 1,000 meters, half that of the men’s races.

With the introduction of Title IX and other policies that fought against gender discrimination, women’s rowing eventually reached the point it’s at today.  There has been an especially noticeable increase in participation at the college level, and it is an NCAA sport.  Thanks to advocates like Penny Chuter (Great Britain), Ingrid Dieterle (Germany), and Nely Gambon de Vos (Netherlands), women now race the same distance as men (2,000 meters).  There are even instances when co-ed teams compete.  In 2022, the United States Postal Service issued four Forever stamps honoring Women’s Rowing.  They commemorate the obstacles early women rowers overcame as well as the impressive accomplishments of female athletes today.

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US #5694-97
2022 Women’s Rowing

  • Commemorates women’s rowing


Stamp Category: 
Commemorative
Value:  58¢ First Class Mail Rate (Forever)
First Day of Issue:  May 13, 2022
First Day City:  Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Quantity Issued:  18,000,000
Printed by:  Ashton Potter (USA) Ltd.
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Panes of 20
Tagging:  Nonphosphored type III, block tag

Why the stamps were issued:  To celebrate women’s rowing and its history.

About the stamp design:  Includes four different stamp designs on a pane of 20.  The artwork covers the entire pane, picturing five, 8-person rowing teams on the water.  The eight rowers face left, with a ninth person (the coxswain) in the selvage of each boat facing the opposite direction.  The stamps picture artwork by Nancy Stahl.

First Day City:  The First Day of Issue Ceremony was held at the Philadelphia Girls’ Rowing Club in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

History the stamp represents:  Women’s rowing began in the early 19th century.  However, due to gender stereotypes, women’s races were few and far between.  It wasn’t until the 20th century that things really took off.

During the Victorian era, it was believed certain activities were too strenuous for a woman’s health.  One such activity was rowing.  Even when women were allowed to participate, they had to wear cumbersome outfits (including stiff corsets), which restricted their movements.  The only competitions that included women were informal ones between local club teams.  This began to change with the first national events in the early 1900s and the first international events in the 1950s.  Still, it wasn’t until 1976 that women’s rowing events were added to the Olympics, though the distance was only 1,000 meters, half that of the men’s races.

With the introduction of Title IX and other policies that fought against gender discrimination, women’s rowing eventually reached the point it’s at today.  There has been an especially noticeable increase in participation at the college level, and it is an NCAA sport.  Thanks to advocates like Penny Chuter (Great Britain), Ingrid Dieterle (Germany), and Nely Gambon de Vos (Netherlands), women now race the same distance as men (2,000 meters).  There are even instances when co-ed teams compete.  In 2022, the United States Postal Service issued four Forever stamps honoring Women’s Rowing.  They commemorate the obstacles early women rowers overcame as well as the impressive accomplishments of female athletes today.