1939 2c John Adams, dark rose

# 841 - 1939 2c John Adams, dark rose

$0.20 - $2.25
Image Condition Price Qty
344553
Mint Stamp(s) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days. Free with 230 Points
$ 0.65
$ 0.65
0
344554
Mint Stamp(s) Fine Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 1.05
$ 1.05
1
344555
Mint Stamp(s) Fine, Never Hinged Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 1.25
$ 1.25
2
344563
Mint Line Pair Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 2.25
$ 2.25
3
344562
Mint Coil Pair Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 1.40
$ 1.40
4
344558
Mint Stamp(s) Very Fine Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 1.25
$ 1.25
5
344559
Mint Stamp(s) Very Fine, Never Hinged Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 1.50
$ 1.50
6
344564
Used Single Stamp(s) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 0.35
$ 0.35
7
702579
Used Line Pair Sold out. Sold out.
Sold Out
No Image
Used Stamp(s) small flaws Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 0.20
$ 0.20
8
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U.S. #841
2¢ Adams
1939 Presidential Series
Rotary Coil

Issue Date: January 20, 1939
First City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity Issued: 4,387,151,000 (total of both coil types)
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforation: 10 vertically
Color: Rose carmine
 
The first Vice-President, John Adams, went on to become our second President. During his term, the capital moved from Philadelphia to Washington, D.C. He and Mrs. Adams were the first to live in the White House, which was partially complete when they moved in.
 
The 1938 Presidential Series was printed on rotary press and perforated 11 x 10.5. In 1939, the 1¢ to 10¢ denominations were issued as coil stamps with a 10 gauge perforations vertically. The 1¢ to 3¢ denominations were also issued with horizontal perforations.
 
The Prexies

Known affectionately as the Prexies the 1938 Presidential series is a favorite among stamp collectors.

The series was issued in response to public clamoring for a new Regular Issue series. The series that was current at the time had been in use for more than a decade. President Franklin D. Roosevelt agreed, and a contest was staged. The public was asked to submit original designs for a new series picturing all deceased U.S. Presidents. Over 1,100 sketches were submitted, many from veteran stamp collectors. Elaine Rawlinson, who had little knowledge of stamps, won the contest and collected the $500 prize. Rawlinson was the first stamp designer since the Bureau of Engraving and Printing began producing U.S. stamps who was not a government employee.

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U.S. #841
2¢ Adams
1939 Presidential Series
Rotary Coil

Issue Date: January 20, 1939
First City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity Issued: 4,387,151,000 (total of both coil types)
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforation: 10 vertically
Color: Rose carmine
 
The first Vice-President, John Adams, went on to become our second President. During his term, the capital moved from Philadelphia to Washington, D.C. He and Mrs. Adams were the first to live in the White House, which was partially complete when they moved in.
 
The 1938 Presidential Series was printed on rotary press and perforated 11 x 10.5. In 1939, the 1¢ to 10¢ denominations were issued as coil stamps with a 10 gauge perforations vertically. The 1¢ to 3¢ denominations were also issued with horizontal perforations.
 
The Prexies

Known affectionately as the Prexies the 1938 Presidential series is a favorite among stamp collectors.

The series was issued in response to public clamoring for a new Regular Issue series. The series that was current at the time had been in use for more than a decade. President Franklin D. Roosevelt agreed, and a contest was staged. The public was asked to submit original designs for a new series picturing all deceased U.S. Presidents. Over 1,100 sketches were submitted, many from veteran stamp collectors. Elaine Rawlinson, who had little knowledge of stamps, won the contest and collected the $500 prize. Rawlinson was the first stamp designer since the Bureau of Engraving and Printing began producing U.S. stamps who was not a government employee.