#1065 – 1955 3¢ Land Grant Colleges

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.40
$0.40
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.25
$0.25
4 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636215x30mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM50145x30mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420245x30mm 50 Horizontal Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #1065
1955 3¢ First Land Grant Colleges

Issue Date: February 12, 1955
City:  East Lansing, Michigan
Quantity: 120,484,800
Printed by:
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Rotary Press
Perforations:
 11 x 10 ½
Color:  Green
 
The two universities pictured on U.S. #1065, Michigan State and Pennsylvania State, were established as land-grant institutions on the state level in February 1855. The Agricultural College of the State of Michigan was granted 14,000 acres of state land on February 12. Ten days later, the Farmer’s High School of Pennsylvania was re-established as the Pennsylvania State University. Together, they served as the model for the Morrill Act of 1862.
 
The purpose of the land grant institutions as expressed in the legislation is “…without excluding other scientific and classical studies and including military tactic, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such manner as the legislatures of the States may respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions in life.”
 
Michigan and Pennsylvania State Universities
First Land Grant Colleges
 
The Morrill Act of 1862, named for its sponsor, Vermont Congressman Justin Smith Morrill, granted each state 30,000 acres of federal land for each of its congressmen. This land was to be sold to finance the creation or expansion of colleges, particularly those teaching agricultural and mechanical arts.
 
One of the many colleges that benefited from the Morrill Act was Pennsylvania State University. Popularly known as Penn State, this co-educational institution has 23 campuses in Pennsylvania. The school was first founded in 1855 as the Farmer’s High School. The university took its current name in 1953.
 

The Morrill Act

On July 2, 1862, the Morrill Act was signed into law, promoting a new direction for American education.

Born in Strafford, Vermont, Justin S. Morrill was a powerful US political leader.  He served Vermont as a congressman from 1855-67 and as a senator from 1867-98.  Morrill introduced the Morrill Tariff Act of 1861, and was key to the formation of the Republican Party and in passing the legislation that formed the Library of Congress.

Morrill is best remembered for the Morrill Act of 1862, which established land-grant colleges and universities.  The idea was based on the first land-grant institutions established on the state level in February 1855.  The Agricultural College of the State of Michigan was granted 14,000 acres of state land on February 12.  Ten days later, the Farmer’s High School of Pennsylvania was re-established as the Pennsylvania State University.  Together, they served as the model for the Morrill Act of 1862.

Morrill introduced his first land-grant bill to Congress in 1857.  Its purpose was to offer a course of study that wasn’t based on either abstract liberal arts or on military science, which were the primary focuses of higher education during the 1800s.

According to Morrill, “This bill proposes to establish at least one college in every State upon a sure and perpetual foundation, accessible to all, but especially to the sons of toil, where all of needful science for the practical avocations of life shall be taught, where neither the higher graces of classical studies nor that military drill our country now so greatly appreciates will be entirely ignored, and where agriculture, the foundation of all present and future prosperity, may look for troops of earnest friends, studying its familiar and recondite economies, and at last elevating it to that higher level where it may fearlessly invoke comparison with the most advanced standards of the world.”

Morrill’s bill was passed in 1859 but vetoed by President Buchanan (who also vetoed the Homestead Act).  Morrill resubmitted the bill in 1861 when it was passed.  On July 2, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed the Morrill Act into law.  The first “land-grant college” created under the act was Kansas State University – established February 16, 1863.   

The act gave each state 30,000 acres of Federal land for each of its senators and congressmen.  The states had the option of developing the property or selling it to raise funds to establish “land-grant” colleges.  Land grant colleges, which featured courses on practical agriculture, science, and engineering, were a response to the industrial revolution.  States that had seceded from the Union were not eligible to take advantage of the Morrill Act. 

The act also added military science and tactics to these studies.  Thirty states used the money to start new agricultural and mechanical colleges.  Eighteen states gave the money to existing state universities to form agricultural and mechanical departments.  Three states gave the money to private universities.  The University of California and University of Illinois are two of the best-known land-grant colleges.

A second Morrill Act was passed in 1890.  Aimed at the Southern states, the act required each state to show that race wasn’t a consideration for admission, or to establish a separate land-grant college for African Americans.  Over 100 years later, land grant colleges for Native Americans were introduced.  More recently, the concept has been developed to fund universities for aquatic, urban, space, and sustainable energy research.

 
Read More - Click Here


  • 1940s First Day Covers, Collection of 60 1940s First Day Covers, Collection of 60

    The 1940s were packed with history, and this is your chance to add some of that history to your collection with 60 limited-edition First Day Covers.  You'll see Airmail stamps, commemorative stamps, and definitives.  Order yours now.

    $75.95
    BUY NOW
  • 2002 US Definitive Coll. set of 36, used 2002 US Definitive Collection, Used, 36 Stamps
    Now is a great time to add these stamps to your collection.  You’ll get 36 used stamps SAVE off the regular stamp prices.  Order your 2002 US Definitive Stamp Collection today.
    $6.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1887-98  Reg Issues, 12 stamps, used Classic Definitives, 12 stamps, Used

    Save time and effort with this collector's set of 12 postally used definitive stamps issued from 1887-1898.  These stamps are now all over 110 years old and represent a ton of neat history.  Order today and you'll receive 212, 219, 220, 222, 223, 226, 268, 272, 279, 280, 281 and 283.

    $30.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #1065
1955 3¢ First Land Grant Colleges

Issue Date: February 12, 1955
City:  East Lansing, Michigan
Quantity: 120,484,800
Printed by:
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Rotary Press
Perforations:
 11 x 10 ½
Color:  Green
 
The two universities pictured on U.S. #1065, Michigan State and Pennsylvania State, were established as land-grant institutions on the state level in February 1855. The Agricultural College of the State of Michigan was granted 14,000 acres of state land on February 12. Ten days later, the Farmer’s High School of Pennsylvania was re-established as the Pennsylvania State University. Together, they served as the model for the Morrill Act of 1862.
 
The purpose of the land grant institutions as expressed in the legislation is “…without excluding other scientific and classical studies and including military tactic, to teach such branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such manner as the legislatures of the States may respectively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions in life.”
 
Michigan and Pennsylvania State Universities
First Land Grant Colleges
 
The Morrill Act of 1862, named for its sponsor, Vermont Congressman Justin Smith Morrill, granted each state 30,000 acres of federal land for each of its congressmen. This land was to be sold to finance the creation or expansion of colleges, particularly those teaching agricultural and mechanical arts.
 
One of the many colleges that benefited from the Morrill Act was Pennsylvania State University. Popularly known as Penn State, this co-educational institution has 23 campuses in Pennsylvania. The school was first founded in 1855 as the Farmer’s High School. The university took its current name in 1953.
 

The Morrill Act

On July 2, 1862, the Morrill Act was signed into law, promoting a new direction for American education.

Born in Strafford, Vermont, Justin S. Morrill was a powerful US political leader.  He served Vermont as a congressman from 1855-67 and as a senator from 1867-98.  Morrill introduced the Morrill Tariff Act of 1861, and was key to the formation of the Republican Party and in passing the legislation that formed the Library of Congress.

Morrill is best remembered for the Morrill Act of 1862, which established land-grant colleges and universities.  The idea was based on the first land-grant institutions established on the state level in February 1855.  The Agricultural College of the State of Michigan was granted 14,000 acres of state land on February 12.  Ten days later, the Farmer’s High School of Pennsylvania was re-established as the Pennsylvania State University.  Together, they served as the model for the Morrill Act of 1862.

Morrill introduced his first land-grant bill to Congress in 1857.  Its purpose was to offer a course of study that wasn’t based on either abstract liberal arts or on military science, which were the primary focuses of higher education during the 1800s.

According to Morrill, “This bill proposes to establish at least one college in every State upon a sure and perpetual foundation, accessible to all, but especially to the sons of toil, where all of needful science for the practical avocations of life shall be taught, where neither the higher graces of classical studies nor that military drill our country now so greatly appreciates will be entirely ignored, and where agriculture, the foundation of all present and future prosperity, may look for troops of earnest friends, studying its familiar and recondite economies, and at last elevating it to that higher level where it may fearlessly invoke comparison with the most advanced standards of the world.”

Morrill’s bill was passed in 1859 but vetoed by President Buchanan (who also vetoed the Homestead Act).  Morrill resubmitted the bill in 1861 when it was passed.  On July 2, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed the Morrill Act into law.  The first “land-grant college” created under the act was Kansas State University – established February 16, 1863.   

The act gave each state 30,000 acres of Federal land for each of its senators and congressmen.  The states had the option of developing the property or selling it to raise funds to establish “land-grant” colleges.  Land grant colleges, which featured courses on practical agriculture, science, and engineering, were a response to the industrial revolution.  States that had seceded from the Union were not eligible to take advantage of the Morrill Act. 

The act also added military science and tactics to these studies.  Thirty states used the money to start new agricultural and mechanical colleges.  Eighteen states gave the money to existing state universities to form agricultural and mechanical departments.  Three states gave the money to private universities.  The University of California and University of Illinois are two of the best-known land-grant colleges.

A second Morrill Act was passed in 1890.  Aimed at the Southern states, the act required each state to show that race wasn’t a consideration for admission, or to establish a separate land-grant college for African Americans.  Over 100 years later, land grant colleges for Native Americans were introduced.  More recently, the concept has been developed to fund universities for aquatic, urban, space, and sustainable energy research.