#1290b – 1967 25c Frederick Douglass, magenta

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$30.00
$30.00
1 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM637215x32mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM420027x30mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM75027x31mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
U.S. #1290b
25¢ Frederick Douglass
Prominent Americans Series
 
Issue Date: February 14, 1967
City: Washington, DC
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Rotary Press
Color: Magenta
 
Prominent Americans Series
The Prominent Americans Series recognizes people who played important roles in U.S. history. Officials originally planned to honor 18 individuals, but later added seven others. The Prominent Americans Series began with the 4¢ Lincoln stamp, which was issued on November 10, 1965. During the course of the series, the 6¢ Eisenhower stamp was reissued with an 8¢ denomination and the 5¢ Washington was redrawn.
 
A number of technological changes developed during the course of producing the series, resulting in a number of varieties due to gum, luminescence, precancels and perforations plus sheet, coil and booklet formats. Additionally, seven rate changes occurred while the Prominent Americans Series was current, giving collectors who specialize in first and last day of issue covers an abundance of collecting opportunities.  U.S. # 1290b can be identified from other varieties by its color (magenta).
 
The 25¢ denomination pictures abolitionist and publisher Frederick Douglass (1818-95). The man who would become a leading voice for abolition was born a slave in Tuckahoe, Maryland. At the age of 8, Frederick Douglass was sent to work for one of his master’s relatives. Douglass’ new mistress violated the law and taught him to read. 
 
Douglass escaped to Massachusetts in 1838 and continued to educate himself while working as an unskilled laborer. His impassioned 1841 speech at a Massachusetts Antislavery Society meeting led to a series of anti-slavery lectures. His autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, was published in 1845 to critical acclaim. 
 
Afraid that his former master would reclaim him, Douglass fled to England, where he continued to speak out against slavery. Sympathetic friends raised funds to purchase his freedom, and Douglass returned to the United States in 1847. Douglass fueled the abolitionist movement with his newspaper, The North Star, operated a station on the Underground Railroad, and advised President Lincoln during the Civil War. Later in life, Douglass served as the recorder of deeds in the District of Columbia and U.S. minister to Haiti.
 

Birth of Charles W. Chesnutt

2008 Charles W. Chesnutt stamp
US #4222 – Chesnutt was the 31st honoree in the Black Heritage Series.

Charles Waddell Chesnutt was born on June 20, 1858, in Cleveland, Ohio.  He was a critically-acclaimed author and the first African American novelist to have his work published in the prestigious Atlantic Monthly Magazine.

The son of free blacks, the family had moved to that city from Fayetteville, North Carolina, because of increasing racial tensions building in the South before the Civil War.  When the war ended, the family returned to Fayetteville.  At the age of eight, Chesnutt began to attend the Howard School, which his father helped found.  Over time, the school evolved from a grade school to a high school and finally into North Carolina’s second publicly funded University – Fayetteville State University.

Chesnutt also worked at his father’s store until he was 14.  When forced to leave school because of family hardships, Chesnutt continued his education on his own, studying Latin, German, algebra, literature, and history.  He went on to become his former school’s assistant principal in 1877, and then its principal from 1880 to 1883.

2008 Chesnutt Silk Cachet Combination First Day Cover
US #4222 – Colorano Silk Cachet Combination First Day Cover

In 1883, discouraged and embittered by racial prejudice, Chesnutt moved to Cleveland, Ohio.  There he was able to pursue his dream of becoming an author, while working to change racial bigotry.  In his own words, “I will live down the prejudice, I will crush it out.  I will show to the world that a many may spring from a race of slaves, and yet far excel many of the boasted ruling race.”

Chesnutt had learned stenography when he was younger and began studying law, passing the bar exam in 1887.  He soon opened a successful court reporting (legal stenography) business.  Also in 1887, Chesnutt became the first black novelist to have his fiction published in the prestigious Atlantic Monthly magazine.

2008 Chesnutt Fleetwood First Day Cover
US #4222 – Fleetwood First Day Cover

Two years later, Chesnutt published his first two collections of short stories, The Conjure Woman and The Wife of His Youth and Other Stories of the Color-Line.  His stories were considered much more complex than other writers of his time.  Chesnutt explored the issues of mixed race, illegitimacy, racial identity, class preference, and more.  Chesnutt also wrote a biography of Frederick Douglass.

1967 Douglass stamp
US #1290b – Chesnutt published a biography of Frederick Douglass in 1899.

In 1900, Chesnutt published his first novel, The House Behind the Cedars, with the encouragement of The Atlantic editors.  He followed that with The Marrow of Tradition (1901), which was based on the 1898 Wilmington Coup and Massacre.  That novel has been called “probably the most astute political-historical novel of its day.”  Chesnutt’s novels were critically acclaimed, but weren’t as popular with the public as his short stories.  So, he was never able to make a living solely as a writer, but he did continue to write.  He published his final novel, The Colonel’s Dream, in 1905.  That same year, he achieved enough celebrity status, to be on the guest list of Mark Twain’s 70th birthday party in New York City.

2010 Oscar Micheaux stamp
US #4464 – Micheaux adapted two of Chesnutt’s stories into films in the 1920s.

Beginning in the early 1900s, Chesnutt focused less on writing and more on his court reporting business and social and political activism.  He helped found the NAACP and wrote stories for its magazine, The Crisis.  In the 1920s, Oscar Micheaux adapted two of Chesnutt’s stories into films – The Conjure Woman was the basis for the film The Spider’s Web, and The House Behind the Cedars inspired The Millionaire.  Also in the 1920s, Chesnutt received the NAACP’s Spingarn Medal for his life’s work.

Chesnutt died on November 15, 1932.  Long after his death, several of Chesnutt’s works were published posthumously.  Interest in his work was also revived during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, and in 1987, his alma mater built and named a library in his honor.

You can read some of Chesnutt’s works here.

Read More - Click Here


  • 1940s US Frst Day Cover Collection, Set of 60 1940s First Day Covers, Collection of 60

    The 1940s were packed with history, and this is your chance to add some of that history to your collection with 60 limited-edition First Day Covers.  You'll see Airmail stamps, commemorative stamps, and definitives.  Order yours now.

    $75.95
    BUY NOW
  • 2002 US Definitive Coll. set of 36, used 2002 US Definitive Collection, Used, 36 Stamps
    Now is a great time to add these stamps to your collection.  You’ll get 36 used stamps SAVE off the regular stamp prices.  Order your 2002 US Definitive Stamp Collection today.
    $6.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1887-98  Reg Issues, 12 stamps, used Classic Definitives, 12 stamps, Used

    Save time and effort with this collector's set of 12 postally used definitive stamps issued from 1887-1898.  These stamps are now all over 110 years old and represent a ton of neat history.  Order today and you'll receive 212, 219, 220, 222, 223, 226, 268, 272, 279, 280, 281 and 283.

    $30.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #1290b
25¢ Frederick Douglass
Prominent Americans Series
 
Issue Date: February 14, 1967
City: Washington, DC
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Rotary Press
Color: Magenta
 
Prominent Americans Series
The Prominent Americans Series recognizes people who played important roles in U.S. history. Officials originally planned to honor 18 individuals, but later added seven others. The Prominent Americans Series began with the 4¢ Lincoln stamp, which was issued on November 10, 1965. During the course of the series, the 6¢ Eisenhower stamp was reissued with an 8¢ denomination and the 5¢ Washington was redrawn.
 
A number of technological changes developed during the course of producing the series, resulting in a number of varieties due to gum, luminescence, precancels and perforations plus sheet, coil and booklet formats. Additionally, seven rate changes occurred while the Prominent Americans Series was current, giving collectors who specialize in first and last day of issue covers an abundance of collecting opportunities.  U.S. # 1290b can be identified from other varieties by its color (magenta).
 
The 25¢ denomination pictures abolitionist and publisher Frederick Douglass (1818-95). The man who would become a leading voice for abolition was born a slave in Tuckahoe, Maryland. At the age of 8, Frederick Douglass was sent to work for one of his master’s relatives. Douglass’ new mistress violated the law and taught him to read. 
 
Douglass escaped to Massachusetts in 1838 and continued to educate himself while working as an unskilled laborer. His impassioned 1841 speech at a Massachusetts Antislavery Society meeting led to a series of anti-slavery lectures. His autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, was published in 1845 to critical acclaim. 
 
Afraid that his former master would reclaim him, Douglass fled to England, where he continued to speak out against slavery. Sympathetic friends raised funds to purchase his freedom, and Douglass returned to the United States in 1847. Douglass fueled the abolitionist movement with his newspaper, The North Star, operated a station on the Underground Railroad, and advised President Lincoln during the Civil War. Later in life, Douglass served as the recorder of deeds in the District of Columbia and U.S. minister to Haiti.
 

Birth of Charles W. Chesnutt

2008 Charles W. Chesnutt stamp
US #4222 – Chesnutt was the 31st honoree in the Black Heritage Series.

Charles Waddell Chesnutt was born on June 20, 1858, in Cleveland, Ohio.  He was a critically-acclaimed author and the first African American novelist to have his work published in the prestigious Atlantic Monthly Magazine.

The son of free blacks, the family had moved to that city from Fayetteville, North Carolina, because of increasing racial tensions building in the South before the Civil War.  When the war ended, the family returned to Fayetteville.  At the age of eight, Chesnutt began to attend the Howard School, which his father helped found.  Over time, the school evolved from a grade school to a high school and finally into North Carolina’s second publicly funded University – Fayetteville State University.

Chesnutt also worked at his father’s store until he was 14.  When forced to leave school because of family hardships, Chesnutt continued his education on his own, studying Latin, German, algebra, literature, and history.  He went on to become his former school’s assistant principal in 1877, and then its principal from 1880 to 1883.

2008 Chesnutt Silk Cachet Combination First Day Cover
US #4222 – Colorano Silk Cachet Combination First Day Cover

In 1883, discouraged and embittered by racial prejudice, Chesnutt moved to Cleveland, Ohio.  There he was able to pursue his dream of becoming an author, while working to change racial bigotry.  In his own words, “I will live down the prejudice, I will crush it out.  I will show to the world that a many may spring from a race of slaves, and yet far excel many of the boasted ruling race.”

Chesnutt had learned stenography when he was younger and began studying law, passing the bar exam in 1887.  He soon opened a successful court reporting (legal stenography) business.  Also in 1887, Chesnutt became the first black novelist to have his fiction published in the prestigious Atlantic Monthly magazine.

2008 Chesnutt Fleetwood First Day Cover
US #4222 – Fleetwood First Day Cover

Two years later, Chesnutt published his first two collections of short stories, The Conjure Woman and The Wife of His Youth and Other Stories of the Color-Line.  His stories were considered much more complex than other writers of his time.  Chesnutt explored the issues of mixed race, illegitimacy, racial identity, class preference, and more.  Chesnutt also wrote a biography of Frederick Douglass.

1967 Douglass stamp
US #1290b – Chesnutt published a biography of Frederick Douglass in 1899.

In 1900, Chesnutt published his first novel, The House Behind the Cedars, with the encouragement of The Atlantic editors.  He followed that with The Marrow of Tradition (1901), which was based on the 1898 Wilmington Coup and Massacre.  That novel has been called “probably the most astute political-historical novel of its day.”  Chesnutt’s novels were critically acclaimed, but weren’t as popular with the public as his short stories.  So, he was never able to make a living solely as a writer, but he did continue to write.  He published his final novel, The Colonel’s Dream, in 1905.  That same year, he achieved enough celebrity status, to be on the guest list of Mark Twain’s 70th birthday party in New York City.

2010 Oscar Micheaux stamp
US #4464 – Micheaux adapted two of Chesnutt’s stories into films in the 1920s.

Beginning in the early 1900s, Chesnutt focused less on writing and more on his court reporting business and social and political activism.  He helped found the NAACP and wrote stories for its magazine, The Crisis.  In the 1920s, Oscar Micheaux adapted two of Chesnutt’s stories into films – The Conjure Woman was the basis for the film The Spider’s Web, and The House Behind the Cedars inspired The Millionaire.  Also in the 1920s, Chesnutt received the NAACP’s Spingarn Medal for his life’s work.

Chesnutt died on November 15, 1932.  Long after his death, several of Chesnutt’s works were published posthumously.  Interest in his work was also revived during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, and in 1987, his alma mater built and named a library in his honor.

You can read some of Chesnutt’s works here.