#4464 – 2010 44c Black Heritage: Oscar Micheaux

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.80
$1.80
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.50
$0.50
7 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM62232x47mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$4.75
$4.75
- MM420932x47mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$4.75
$4.75
 
U.S. #4464
Oscar Micheaux
Black Heritage Series

Issue Date: June 22, 2010
City: New York, NY

Birth Of Oscar Micheaux

Author, director, and producer Oscar Devereaux Micheaux was born on January 2, 1884, in Metropolis, Illinois. 

Micheaux was born on a farm, but his parents moved the family to a nearby city to give their children a better education.  This was short-lived, however, as money troubles sent them back to the farm.  Micheaux became restless and frequently got himself in trouble.  As a result, his father sent him back to the city to do marketing.

Micheaux enjoyed his marketing work in the city – it allowed him to meet lots of people and develop social skills that would help in his later career.  Micheaux moved to Chicago when he was 17 and worked a series of jobs in stockyards and steel mills.  He eventually realized he wanted to be his own boss so he started his own business – a shoeshine stand in a barbershop.  Micheaux then got a job as a Pullman porter for a railroad.  He greatly enjoyed this job – he got to travel the country, meet lots of people, and make enough money to save a substantial amount.   

After leaving his railroad job, Micheaux went to South Dakota and worked as a homesteader.  The time he spent there provided ample inspiration for his subsequent books and movies.  During this time, Micheaux also started submitting articles to local newspapers.  He discovered his love of writing and decided to commit his time to that.  He published his first book anonymously in 1913.  It was largely based on his life as a homesteader. 

In 1918, a movie studio showed interest in making Micheaux’s novel, The Homesteader, into a movie.  The deal fell through because they didn’t want to give him direct involvement in the film.  So Micheaux decided to start his own enterprise – the Micheaux Film & Book Company.  He immediately set to adapting The Homesteader for film and it was generally well-received.  The success of that film launched his career as a filmmaker.

Micheaux’s movies were a radical departure from Hollywood.  When D.W. Griffith portrayed the Ku Klux Klan as heroes in his film The Birth of a Nation, Micheaux responded by producing Within Our Gates – showing racial discrimination, lynching, and other white-on-black violence.  He also moved away from the usual Hollywood stereotype of African Americans being servants or buffoons.

At a time when most black filmmakers were going bankrupt, Oscar Micheaux thrived.  He worked tirelessly to keep his company afloat.  To finance his films, Micheaux toured the country seeking advances from theater owners.  In order to increase ticket sales, he convinced white theater owners to have special midnight showings for black audiences.

While many of the films he made were based on his own works, he also produced movies based on other writings.  He made two movies based on the works of Charles W. Chesnutt – The Conjure Woman and The House Behind the Cedars.

Micheaux is considered the first major African-American feature film maker.  He produced more than 44 films and wrote several books.  Micheaux paved the way for other black filmmakers.  The Producers Guild of America called him “The most prolific black – if not most prolific independent – filmmaker in American cinema.”

Micheaux died of heart failure on March 25, 1951 while on a business trip in North Carolina.  He’s received a number honors since his death including a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and a society at Duke University named in his honor.  Plus, each year, the Producers Guild of America presents the Oscar Micheaux Award to a producer whose achievements in film have been accomplished despite difficult odds.

Read More - Click Here


  • 1998-2019 U.S. Semi-Postal Stamps, plus FREE 2014 Imperforate Semi-Postal, 8 stamps 1998-2019 U.S. Semi-Postal Stamps

    Semi-postal stamps are issued to serve a double purpose.  Priced higher than regular postage, they pay the current mailing rate plus an added amount contributed to a charitable cause.  As of 2019, eight semi-postal (sometimes called "fundraising") stamps had been issued.  Now you can get them in one easy order and receive the B5a imperforate semi-postal FREE!

    $13.50
    BUY NOW
  • 1990s First Day Covers, Collection of 100 100 First Day Covers Issued During the 1990s
    Some of the stamps I saw in my set of 100 covers highlighted Looney Tunes characters, statehood anniversaries, Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm, Elvis Presley, Dorothy Parker, and more.  Order your set today.
    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1922-32 Regular Issues, 24 stamps, used 1922-32 Regular Issues, 24 used stamps

    This set of 24 postally used 1922-32 regular issues stamps is a great addition to your collection. Order today to receive: 571, 610, 632, 634, 635, 636, 637, 638, 639, 640, 641, 642, 653,684, 685, 692, 693, 694, 697, 698, 699, 700, 701, and 720.

    $6.25
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #4464
Oscar Micheaux
Black Heritage Series

Issue Date: June 22, 2010
City: New York, NY

Birth Of Oscar Micheaux

Author, director, and producer Oscar Devereaux Micheaux was born on January 2, 1884, in Metropolis, Illinois. 

Micheaux was born on a farm, but his parents moved the family to a nearby city to give their children a better education.  This was short-lived, however, as money troubles sent them back to the farm.  Micheaux became restless and frequently got himself in trouble.  As a result, his father sent him back to the city to do marketing.

Micheaux enjoyed his marketing work in the city – it allowed him to meet lots of people and develop social skills that would help in his later career.  Micheaux moved to Chicago when he was 17 and worked a series of jobs in stockyards and steel mills.  He eventually realized he wanted to be his own boss so he started his own business – a shoeshine stand in a barbershop.  Micheaux then got a job as a Pullman porter for a railroad.  He greatly enjoyed this job – he got to travel the country, meet lots of people, and make enough money to save a substantial amount.   

After leaving his railroad job, Micheaux went to South Dakota and worked as a homesteader.  The time he spent there provided ample inspiration for his subsequent books and movies.  During this time, Micheaux also started submitting articles to local newspapers.  He discovered his love of writing and decided to commit his time to that.  He published his first book anonymously in 1913.  It was largely based on his life as a homesteader. 

In 1918, a movie studio showed interest in making Micheaux’s novel, The Homesteader, into a movie.  The deal fell through because they didn’t want to give him direct involvement in the film.  So Micheaux decided to start his own enterprise – the Micheaux Film & Book Company.  He immediately set to adapting The Homesteader for film and it was generally well-received.  The success of that film launched his career as a filmmaker.

Micheaux’s movies were a radical departure from Hollywood.  When D.W. Griffith portrayed the Ku Klux Klan as heroes in his film The Birth of a Nation, Micheaux responded by producing Within Our Gates – showing racial discrimination, lynching, and other white-on-black violence.  He also moved away from the usual Hollywood stereotype of African Americans being servants or buffoons.

At a time when most black filmmakers were going bankrupt, Oscar Micheaux thrived.  He worked tirelessly to keep his company afloat.  To finance his films, Micheaux toured the country seeking advances from theater owners.  In order to increase ticket sales, he convinced white theater owners to have special midnight showings for black audiences.

While many of the films he made were based on his own works, he also produced movies based on other writings.  He made two movies based on the works of Charles W. Chesnutt – The Conjure Woman and The House Behind the Cedars.

Micheaux is considered the first major African-American feature film maker.  He produced more than 44 films and wrote several books.  Micheaux paved the way for other black filmmakers.  The Producers Guild of America called him “The most prolific black – if not most prolific independent – filmmaker in American cinema.”

Micheaux died of heart failure on March 25, 1951 while on a business trip in North Carolina.  He’s received a number honors since his death including a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and a society at Duke University named in his honor.  Plus, each year, the Producers Guild of America presents the Oscar Micheaux Award to a producer whose achievements in film have been accomplished despite difficult odds.