#1329a – 1967 5c Voice of America

U.S. #1329a Tagging Omitted
5¢ Voice of America

Issue Date: August 1, 1967
City: Washington, DC
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Lithographed, engraved
Perforations: 11
Color: Red, blue, black and carmine
 
Celebrates the 25th anniversary of the Voice of America, the radio broadcasting branch of the United States Information Agency.
 

Voice of America

On February 1, 1942, Voice of America provided its first international broadcast.

Prior to World War II, private companies ran all American-run shortwave stations.  These included the National Broadcasting Company’s International Network, which broadcast in six languages and the Columbia Broadcasting System, with 64 stations in 18 countries. 

In 1939, the Federal Communications Commission established a new policy stating that “A licensee of an international broadcast station shall render only an international broadcast service which will reflect the culture of this country and which will promote international goodwill, understanding and cooperation.”  This was intended as part of the State Department’s Good Neighbor policy, though some saw it as a form of censorship. 

Before the Japanese had attacked Pearl Harbor, the US Office of the Coordinator of Information was already giving war news to commercial shortwave radio stations.  This information was provided by playwright and speechwriter Robert E. Sherwood through the Foreign Information Service (FIS).  Then a week after the US entered the war in December 1941, the FIS began delivering its own broadcasts. 

After that, the FIS recognized a need to establish a permanent organization and founded Voice of America on February 1, 1942.  That day they delivered their first broadcast to Germany.  That initial broadcast opened with “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” and was followed by a pledge: “"Today, and every day from now on, we will be with you from America to talk about the war... The news may be good or bad for us – We will always tell you the truth.”  President Franklin Roosevelt personally approved the broadcast.

Later in 1942, the Office of War information took over the Voice of America’s operations.  They also came to an agreement with the British Broadcasting Corporation to share transmitters in Britain.  And as the Allies succeeded in North Africa, Italy, and the Philippines, they established transmitters there as well.  By the time the war ended, they had 39 transmitters offering service in 40 languages.  They offered over 1,000 programs, broadcast from their offices in New York and San Francisco.  These programs included news, music, and commentary. 

About half of the VOA’s services were discontinued in 1945 before they were transferred to the Department of State.  Two years later, they began broadcasting to the Soviet Union to combat their propaganda.  In the coming years, VOA installed a relay facility on a US Coast Guard cutter.  It was supposed to be the first in a fleet of mobile broadcasting ships, but some accused them of being pirate radio ships and the project was abandoned. 

In the 1960s and 70s, the VOA carried some of the most important news of the day overseas, including Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream Speech” and the moon landing.  In 1976, President Gerald Ford awarded the VOA its charter with its mission “to broadcast accurate, balanced, and comprehensive news and information to an international audience.”

Now you can own this stamp with rare tagging omitted.  Did you know a stamp missing its phosphorescent tagging is considered by many to be similar to a missing color error? The good news is that unlike some error stamps, untagged error stamps are affordable.

What is Phosphorescent Tagging and Why is it Important?

Tagging of U.S. stamps was introduced in 1963 with airmail stamp #C64a. It helps the U.S. Post Office use automation to move the mail at a lower cost. A virtually invisible phosphorescent material is applied either to stamp ink or paper, or to stamps after printing. This “taggant” causes each one to glow in shades of green (red on older airmails) for a moment after exposure to short-wave ultraviolet (UV) light. The afterglow makes it possible for facing-canceling machines to locate the stamp on the mail piece, and properly position it for automated cancellation and sorting.

Some stamps have been printed with and without tagging intentionally, but when tagging is omitted by accident, we collectors are treated to a scarce modern color error. Our stamp experts examined thousands of stamps to find these just for you. Now you can easily give your error collection a boost or explore this fascinating new area of collecting. Quantities are limited, so order your untagged error stamp right away.

And find more tagging omitted stamps here.

 
 
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U.S. #1329a Tagging Omitted
5¢ Voice of America

Issue Date: August 1, 1967
City: Washington, DC
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Lithographed, engraved
Perforations: 11
Color: Red, blue, black and carmine
 
Celebrates the 25th anniversary of the Voice of America, the radio broadcasting branch of the United States Information Agency.
 

Voice of America

On February 1, 1942, Voice of America provided its first international broadcast.

Prior to World War II, private companies ran all American-run shortwave stations.  These included the National Broadcasting Company’s International Network, which broadcast in six languages and the Columbia Broadcasting System, with 64 stations in 18 countries. 

In 1939, the Federal Communications Commission established a new policy stating that “A licensee of an international broadcast station shall render only an international broadcast service which will reflect the culture of this country and which will promote international goodwill, understanding and cooperation.”  This was intended as part of the State Department’s Good Neighbor policy, though some saw it as a form of censorship. 

Before the Japanese had attacked Pearl Harbor, the US Office of the Coordinator of Information was already giving war news to commercial shortwave radio stations.  This information was provided by playwright and speechwriter Robert E. Sherwood through the Foreign Information Service (FIS).  Then a week after the US entered the war in December 1941, the FIS began delivering its own broadcasts. 

After that, the FIS recognized a need to establish a permanent organization and founded Voice of America on February 1, 1942.  That day they delivered their first broadcast to Germany.  That initial broadcast opened with “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” and was followed by a pledge: “"Today, and every day from now on, we will be with you from America to talk about the war... The news may be good or bad for us – We will always tell you the truth.”  President Franklin Roosevelt personally approved the broadcast.

Later in 1942, the Office of War information took over the Voice of America’s operations.  They also came to an agreement with the British Broadcasting Corporation to share transmitters in Britain.  And as the Allies succeeded in North Africa, Italy, and the Philippines, they established transmitters there as well.  By the time the war ended, they had 39 transmitters offering service in 40 languages.  They offered over 1,000 programs, broadcast from their offices in New York and San Francisco.  These programs included news, music, and commentary. 

About half of the VOA’s services were discontinued in 1945 before they were transferred to the Department of State.  Two years later, they began broadcasting to the Soviet Union to combat their propaganda.  In the coming years, VOA installed a relay facility on a US Coast Guard cutter.  It was supposed to be the first in a fleet of mobile broadcasting ships, but some accused them of being pirate radio ships and the project was abandoned. 

In the 1960s and 70s, the VOA carried some of the most important news of the day overseas, including Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream Speech” and the moon landing.  In 1976, President Gerald Ford awarded the VOA its charter with its mission “to broadcast accurate, balanced, and comprehensive news and information to an international audience.”

Now you can own this stamp with rare tagging omitted.  Did you know a stamp missing its phosphorescent tagging is considered by many to be similar to a missing color error? The good news is that unlike some error stamps, untagged error stamps are affordable.

What is Phosphorescent Tagging and Why is it Important?

Tagging of U.S. stamps was introduced in 1963 with airmail stamp #C64a. It helps the U.S. Post Office use automation to move the mail at a lower cost. A virtually invisible phosphorescent material is applied either to stamp ink or paper, or to stamps after printing. This “taggant” causes each one to glow in shades of green (red on older airmails) for a moment after exposure to short-wave ultraviolet (UV) light. The afterglow makes it possible for facing-canceling machines to locate the stamp on the mail piece, and properly position it for automated cancellation and sorting.

Some stamps have been printed with and without tagging intentionally, but when tagging is omitted by accident, we collectors are treated to a scarce modern color error. Our stamp experts examined thousands of stamps to find these just for you. Now you can easily give your error collection a boost or explore this fascinating new area of collecting. Quantities are limited, so order your untagged error stamp right away.

And find more tagging omitted stamps here.