#1371 – 1969 6c Apollo 8 Moon Orbit

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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- MM50250 Vertical Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 30 x 45 millimeters (1-3/16 x 1-3/4 inches)
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- MM4203Mystic Clear Mount 30x45mm - 50 precut mounts
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Issue Date:  May 5, 1969

City:  Houston, TX
Quantity:  187,165,000

Printed By:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Printing Method:  Giori Press

Perforations:  11

Color:  Black, blue and ocher

 

This stamp honors Apollo 8, which was launched from Cape Kennedy, Florida on December 21, 1968.  The goal of the mission was to put astronauts in orbit around the moon, and advance toward the eventual goal of landing on the moon.

 

Apollo 8 and Johnson Space Center

The Apollo program was created to land humans on the Moon and return them safely to Earth.  Apollo 8 achieved many important steps vital to achieving this goal.  These included orbiting the Moon and taking photos of its surface.

After the Apollo 8 mission was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, the Mission Control center at Johnson Space Center monitored the various systems that kept the astronauts safe and the spacecraft functioning properly.

 

In 1962, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, or NASA, began construction of the Manned Space Center.  The center was renamed the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in February 1973, after the death of the former President.  Johnson Space Center is the headquarters for all U.S. manned spacecraft projects conducted by NASA.  It covers about 1,600 acres in Houston.

 

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Issue Date:  May 5, 1969

City:  Houston, TX
Quantity:  187,165,000

Printed By:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing

Printing Method:  Giori Press

Perforations:  11

Color:  Black, blue and ocher

 

This stamp honors Apollo 8, which was launched from Cape Kennedy, Florida on December 21, 1968.  The goal of the mission was to put astronauts in orbit around the moon, and advance toward the eventual goal of landing on the moon.

 

Apollo 8 and Johnson Space Center

The Apollo program was created to land humans on the Moon and return them safely to Earth.  Apollo 8 achieved many important steps vital to achieving this goal.  These included orbiting the Moon and taking photos of its surface.

After the Apollo 8 mission was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, the Mission Control center at Johnson Space Center monitored the various systems that kept the astronauts safe and the spacecraft functioning properly.

 

In 1962, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, or NASA, began construction of the Manned Space Center.  The center was renamed the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in February 1973, after the death of the former President.  Johnson Space Center is the headquarters for all U.S. manned spacecraft projects conducted by NASA.  It covers about 1,600 acres in Houston.