#2782 – 1993 29c Stamp & Bar code

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. iFREE with 350 points!
$2.00
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.15
4 More - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
camera Mystic First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.95
camera Classic First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.50
camera Fleetwood First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.20
camera Silk First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.75
Grading Guide

Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM64025 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 36 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-7/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.75
- MM50550 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 46 x 36 millimeters (1-13/16 x 1-7/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.50
U.S. #2782
29¢ Stamps and Barcodes
National Postal Museum
 
Issue Date: July 30, 1993
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 37,500,000
Printed By: American Bank Note Company
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations:
11
Color: Multicolored
 
As early as 1896 the Post Office Department was considering using automobiles to replace horse-drawn vehicles. Not only would they reduce the time needed to deliver mail, but it was also hoped they would reduce the number of postmen needed as well. In 1899 experiments in Cleveland and Buffalo proved successful. In fact the time to deliver mail was reduced considerably - by more than 50%! Plus, automobiles could be used to equal advantage in both large metropolitan cities, as well as small towns and rural areas.
 
Shortly after the turn of the century the Post Office began earnestly testing the feasibility of using “motorized wagons.” In 1906, Baltimore was selected as the site for the first city-wide testing of automobile service. In time, automobiles dramatically changed the movement and organization of our mail service.
 
Eventually trucks replaced automobiles, which had a limited carrying capacity. Ford Model A trucks were used by the Postal Service for nearly 25 years as the principal vehicle for city mail delivery. So exhausted was the fleet by the end of its term that the trucks were sold for a mere $8.00 apiece. Today the Postal Service maintains over 140,000 trucks.
Read More - Click Here

  • Get Mystic's exclusive Historic Postage Stamps of the United States album U.S. Stamp Starter Kit – #M11986

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps – #M8104 3-Volume American Heirloom Album – #M8104

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album – #M11954

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #2782
29¢ Stamps and Barcodes
National Postal Museum
 
Issue Date: July 30, 1993
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 37,500,000
Printed By: American Bank Note Company
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations:
11
Color: Multicolored
 
As early as 1896 the Post Office Department was considering using automobiles to replace horse-drawn vehicles. Not only would they reduce the time needed to deliver mail, but it was also hoped they would reduce the number of postmen needed as well. In 1899 experiments in Cleveland and Buffalo proved successful. In fact the time to deliver mail was reduced considerably - by more than 50%! Plus, automobiles could be used to equal advantage in both large metropolitan cities, as well as small towns and rural areas.
 
Shortly after the turn of the century the Post Office began earnestly testing the feasibility of using “motorized wagons.” In 1906, Baltimore was selected as the site for the first city-wide testing of automobile service. In time, automobiles dramatically changed the movement and organization of our mail service.
 
Eventually trucks replaced automobiles, which had a limited carrying capacity. Ford Model A trucks were used by the Postal Service for nearly 25 years as the principal vehicle for city mail delivery. So exhausted was the fleet by the end of its term that the trucks were sold for a mere $8.00 apiece. Today the Postal Service maintains over 140,000 trucks.