#3191e – 2000 33c Celebrate the Century - 1990s: Improving Education

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U.S. #3191e
2000 33¢ Improving Education
Celebrate the Century

Issue Date: May 2, 2000
City: Monterey, CA
Quantity: 8,250,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 ½
Color: Multicolored
 
The quality of the American educational system has always been a high priority among citizens. In the 1990s, efforts were made to improve conditions in schools and focus students more on learning.
 
Parents, teachers, school officials, and community members all worked together to produce well-rounded students in the ‘90s. For example, many students were required to complete volunteer service to be eligible for graduation. Also, efforts were made to expose children to a wide variety of subjects by balancing their course loads.  Outside sources, such as private businesses, helped schools obtain equipment like televisions and video cassette recorders.
 
The profound technological advances of the 1990s helped improve education. At the start of the decade, about three percent of all classrooms were connected to the Internet. By 1998, about half had Internet access, and that number continues to grow. Computers and the Internet became valuable tools that are sure to change the way students learn in the future.
 
The issue of school safety, which has always been a priority for educators and the community, moved to the forefront in the 1990s. As a result of safety concerns, uniforms became mandatory in many schools.
 

World Teachers’ Day

1957 3¢ School Teachers stamp
US #1093 was issued for the 100th anniversary of the National Education Association.

On October 5, 1994, the first World Teachers’ Day was observed.  Also called International Teachers’ Day, it’s a time to appreciate our teachers and support efforts to improve their education and working conditions.

1985 22¢ Public Education in America stamp
US #2159 was issued for the 350th anniversary of the Boston Latin School.

This date was selected to coincide with the anniversary of the 1966 UNESCO/ILO Recommendation concerning the Status of Teachers.  On October 5, 1966, the UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) and ILO (International Labour Organization) met in Paris.

They issued their recommendation to establish universal rights and responsibilities for teachers as well as standards for their initial and continuing education plus recruitment, employment, and working conditions.  This recommendation covers school level teachers from pre-primary through secondary level and applies to all types of schools – public, private, vocational, technical, and arts.

1980 15¢ Education stamp
US #1833 was issued to honor the creation of the Department of Education.

The 1966 recommendation established international standards for a large variety of issues relating to the professional, social, ethical, and material concerns of teachers.  The opening lines of the recommendation acknowledged that proper education for all is a basic human right, and “the essential role of teachers in educational advancement and the importance of their contribution to the development of man and modern society.”

2000 33¢ Celebrate the Century - 1990s: Improving Education
US #3191e honored the educational improvements of the 1990s.

It also states that “teaching should be regarded as a profession: it is a form of public service which requires of teachers expert knowledge and specialized skills, acquired and maintained through rigorous and continuing study.”  The recommendation further states that teachers’ organizations contribute a great deal to educational advancements and should be included in policy considerations.

In 1997, UNESCO issued its Recommendation concerning the Status of Higher-Education Teaching Personnel, calling for similar practices as set out in the 1966 recommendation for colleges and universities.

1962 4¢ Higher Education stamp
US #1206 marked the 100th anniversary of the first land grant institutions created in the United States.

On October 5, 1994, the United Nations established World Teachers’ Day.  The day’s purpose is to focus on “appreciating, assessing, and improving the educators of the world,” and to consider issues that relate to teachers and teaching.  Communities are encouraged to honor their teachers and teacher organizations as well as their contributions to the education of our future leaders.  Recent years have also included specialized themes, including Valuing Teachers, Improving their Status; Empowering Teachers; the Right to Education Means the Right to a Qualified Teacher; and Young Teachers: the Future of the Profession.  The 2021 theme is Teachers at the Heart of Education Recovery and includes events focused on how the COVID pandemic has affected the teaching profession.

 
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U.S. #3191e
2000 33¢ Improving Education
Celebrate the Century

Issue Date: May 2, 2000
City: Monterey, CA
Quantity: 8,250,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11 ½
Color: Multicolored
 
The quality of the American educational system has always been a high priority among citizens. In the 1990s, efforts were made to improve conditions in schools and focus students more on learning.
 
Parents, teachers, school officials, and community members all worked together to produce well-rounded students in the ‘90s. For example, many students were required to complete volunteer service to be eligible for graduation. Also, efforts were made to expose children to a wide variety of subjects by balancing their course loads.  Outside sources, such as private businesses, helped schools obtain equipment like televisions and video cassette recorders.
 
The profound technological advances of the 1990s helped improve education. At the start of the decade, about three percent of all classrooms were connected to the Internet. By 1998, about half had Internet access, and that number continues to grow. Computers and the Internet became valuable tools that are sure to change the way students learn in the future.
 
The issue of school safety, which has always been a priority for educators and the community, moved to the forefront in the 1990s. As a result of safety concerns, uniforms became mandatory in many schools.
 

World Teachers’ Day

1957 3¢ School Teachers stamp
US #1093 was issued for the 100th anniversary of the National Education Association.

On October 5, 1994, the first World Teachers’ Day was observed.  Also called International Teachers’ Day, it’s a time to appreciate our teachers and support efforts to improve their education and working conditions.

1985 22¢ Public Education in America stamp
US #2159 was issued for the 350th anniversary of the Boston Latin School.

This date was selected to coincide with the anniversary of the 1966 UNESCO/ILO Recommendation concerning the Status of Teachers.  On October 5, 1966, the UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) and ILO (International Labour Organization) met in Paris.

They issued their recommendation to establish universal rights and responsibilities for teachers as well as standards for their initial and continuing education plus recruitment, employment, and working conditions.  This recommendation covers school level teachers from pre-primary through secondary level and applies to all types of schools – public, private, vocational, technical, and arts.

1980 15¢ Education stamp
US #1833 was issued to honor the creation of the Department of Education.

The 1966 recommendation established international standards for a large variety of issues relating to the professional, social, ethical, and material concerns of teachers.  The opening lines of the recommendation acknowledged that proper education for all is a basic human right, and “the essential role of teachers in educational advancement and the importance of their contribution to the development of man and modern society.”

2000 33¢ Celebrate the Century - 1990s: Improving Education
US #3191e honored the educational improvements of the 1990s.

It also states that “teaching should be regarded as a profession: it is a form of public service which requires of teachers expert knowledge and specialized skills, acquired and maintained through rigorous and continuing study.”  The recommendation further states that teachers’ organizations contribute a great deal to educational advancements and should be included in policy considerations.

In 1997, UNESCO issued its Recommendation concerning the Status of Higher-Education Teaching Personnel, calling for similar practices as set out in the 1966 recommendation for colleges and universities.

1962 4¢ Higher Education stamp
US #1206 marked the 100th anniversary of the first land grant institutions created in the United States.

On October 5, 1994, the United Nations established World Teachers’ Day.  The day’s purpose is to focus on “appreciating, assessing, and improving the educators of the world,” and to consider issues that relate to teachers and teaching.  Communities are encouraged to honor their teachers and teacher organizations as well as their contributions to the education of our future leaders.  Recent years have also included specialized themes, including Valuing Teachers, Improving their Status; Empowering Teachers; the Right to Education Means the Right to a Qualified Teacher; and Young Teachers: the Future of the Profession.  The 2021 theme is Teachers at the Heart of Education Recovery and includes events focused on how the COVID pandemic has affected the teaching profession.