#3502 – 2001 34c American Illustrators

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U.S. #3502
34¢ American Illustrators
 
Issue Date: February 1, 2001
City: New York, NY
Quantity:
125,000,000
Printed by: 
Avery Dennison Security Printing
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations: 
Serpentine die cut 11.25
Color: 
Multicolored

This set of stamps from the Classic Collection Series showcases the art of twenty American illustrators of magazines, posters, books, and advertisements. The illustrators featured include:
 
Coles Phillips (1880-1927) – Known for his “fadeaway girl” – who was illustrated in colors or fabrics that blended into the background.
 
Robert Fawcett (1903-1967) – Well-known for illustrations related to Sherlock Holmes that accompanied a popular series about the fictional detective in Collier’s magazine.
 
Joseph Christian Leyendecker (1874-1951) – Early role model for Norman Rockwell. He illustrated over 300 covers for the Saturday Evening Post.
 
Maxfield Parrish (1870-1966) – Creating detailed fantasy lands that were immensely popular with the American public. His rich use of colors led to one being named in his honor – “Parrish Blue.”
 
James Montgomery Flagg (1877-1960) – Used his own facial features to create the famous appearance of “Uncle Sam” in the “I Want You” military recruiting posters.
 
Dean Cornwell (1892-1960) – Created illustrations that accompanied stories written by authors like Pearl Buck and Ernest Hemingway.
 
Rose O’Neill (1874-1944) – Developed “Kewpies” – playful, child-like figures who were so popular they became a line of collectible dolls.
 
Howard Pyle (1853-1911) – Ran prestigious art school that helped earn him the nickname “Father of American Illustration.”
 
Arthur Burdett Frost (1851-1928) – Illustrated the “Uncle Remus” stories written by Joel Chandler Harris, including “Br’er Rabbit” and “Br’er Fox.”
 
Al Parker (1906-1985) – Well-known for illustrations of mothers and daughters on women’s magazines. His images helped set fashion trends.
 
Harvey Dunn (1884-1952) – Created solemn images of World War I as a military artist, and later developed a series of paintings of life on the Dakota prairie.
 
Jon Whitcomb (1906-1988) – Presented images of stylish and glamorous women. Was a U.S. Navy artist who created illustrations of homecoming soldiers in World War II.
 
Neysa McMein (1888-1949) – A member of the “Algonquin Round Table” literary group, McMein helped define images of modern women of the era.
 
Jessie Willcox Smith (1863-1935) – Specialized in pictures of mothers and children. She illustrated almost 200 covers of Good Housekeeping magazine.
 
Edwin Austin Abbey (1852-1911) – Was best known for his detail in illustrating works of Shakespeare or other British historical legends.
 
John Held, Jr. (1889-1958) – His cartoons showed American culture during the “Jazz Age.”
 
Norman Rockwell (1894-1978) – Chronicled life in Small Town, U.S.A., on over 300 covers for the Saturday Evening Post. Also was a primary illustrator for the Boy Scouts of America.
 
Newell Convers Wyeth (1882-1945) – Dramatic illustrator known for his scenes of American historical events.
 
Rockwell Kent (1882-1971) – Worked in different artistic styles, including wood engraving, painting, and lithography. Known for rugged outdoors scenes.
 
Frederic Remington (1861-1909) – Painter and sculptor who chronicled life in the Old West. Also was an artist in Cuba in the Spanish-American War.
 
 
 
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U.S. #3502
34¢ American Illustrators
 
Issue Date: February 1, 2001
City: New York, NY
Quantity:
125,000,000
Printed by: 
Avery Dennison Security Printing
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations: 
Serpentine die cut 11.25
Color: 
Multicolored

This set of stamps from the Classic Collection Series showcases the art of twenty American illustrators of magazines, posters, books, and advertisements. The illustrators featured include:
 
Coles Phillips (1880-1927) – Known for his “fadeaway girl” – who was illustrated in colors or fabrics that blended into the background.
 
Robert Fawcett (1903-1967) – Well-known for illustrations related to Sherlock Holmes that accompanied a popular series about the fictional detective in Collier’s magazine.
 
Joseph Christian Leyendecker (1874-1951) – Early role model for Norman Rockwell. He illustrated over 300 covers for the Saturday Evening Post.
 
Maxfield Parrish (1870-1966) – Creating detailed fantasy lands that were immensely popular with the American public. His rich use of colors led to one being named in his honor – “Parrish Blue.”
 
James Montgomery Flagg (1877-1960) – Used his own facial features to create the famous appearance of “Uncle Sam” in the “I Want You” military recruiting posters.
 
Dean Cornwell (1892-1960) – Created illustrations that accompanied stories written by authors like Pearl Buck and Ernest Hemingway.
 
Rose O’Neill (1874-1944) – Developed “Kewpies” – playful, child-like figures who were so popular they became a line of collectible dolls.
 
Howard Pyle (1853-1911) – Ran prestigious art school that helped earn him the nickname “Father of American Illustration.”
 
Arthur Burdett Frost (1851-1928) – Illustrated the “Uncle Remus” stories written by Joel Chandler Harris, including “Br’er Rabbit” and “Br’er Fox.”
 
Al Parker (1906-1985) – Well-known for illustrations of mothers and daughters on women’s magazines. His images helped set fashion trends.
 
Harvey Dunn (1884-1952) – Created solemn images of World War I as a military artist, and later developed a series of paintings of life on the Dakota prairie.
 
Jon Whitcomb (1906-1988) – Presented images of stylish and glamorous women. Was a U.S. Navy artist who created illustrations of homecoming soldiers in World War II.
 
Neysa McMein (1888-1949) – A member of the “Algonquin Round Table” literary group, McMein helped define images of modern women of the era.
 
Jessie Willcox Smith (1863-1935) – Specialized in pictures of mothers and children. She illustrated almost 200 covers of Good Housekeeping magazine.
 
Edwin Austin Abbey (1852-1911) – Was best known for his detail in illustrating works of Shakespeare or other British historical legends.
 
John Held, Jr. (1889-1958) – His cartoons showed American culture during the “Jazz Age.”
 
Norman Rockwell (1894-1978) – Chronicled life in Small Town, U.S.A., on over 300 covers for the Saturday Evening Post. Also was a primary illustrator for the Boy Scouts of America.
 
Newell Convers Wyeth (1882-1945) – Dramatic illustrator known for his scenes of American historical events.
 
Rockwell Kent (1882-1971) – Worked in different artistic styles, including wood engraving, painting, and lithography. Known for rugged outdoors scenes.
 
Frederic Remington (1861-1909) – Painter and sculptor who chronicled life in the Old West. Also was an artist in Cuba in the Spanish-American War.