#3873 – 2004 37c Art of the American Indian

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U.S. #3873
2004 37¢ Art of American Indian
   
Issue Date: August 21, 2004
City: Santa Fe, NM
Quantity: 8,700,000
Printed By: Avery Dennison
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: 10 ¾ x 11
Color: Multicolored
 
These stamps provide examples of the artistic talent that American Indians from all parts of the country applied to everyday and ceremonial objects. Native craftspeople used the natural resources of each area – plant and animal fibers, clay, stone, and wood – to create distinctive and enduring designs. 
 
The California and Intermountain Indians made beautiful, finely woven baskets that they used for the gathering, storing, and cooking of food.
 
The Iroquois used containers made of bark, and they carved bowls, ladles, and other utensils from wood. In their hands, common wooden utensils became works of art.
 
Mississippian craftsmen achieved remarkable results with natural materials. Stone and clay objects were often shaped in the form of effigies (images of people or animals).
 
To carry and store their belongings, Plains Indian women fashioned cases from raw animal hide. These folded or sewn rawhide envelopes, “parfleches,” were light, rigid, and strong, colorfully painted in geometric patterns.
 
Skilled Tlingit carvers cut natural and symbolic faces and figures into canoe prows, totem poles, door posts, food utensils, storage and cooking boxes, ceremonial masks, and screen partitions. Large totem poles, carved from cedar trunks, stood in front of homes and told the story of the mother’s clan, or a legend or event.
 
Florida Seminole women decorated their garments with sewn-on bands of cloth. When white traders introduced hand-operated sewing machines, more intricate patterns became possible. Dolls dressed in traditional Seminole “patchwork” clothes were sold to tourists.
 
Skilled Navajo craftworkers are famous for their beautiful turquoise and silver jewelry and their finely woven blankets and rugs.
 
The Mimbres of the Classic period made strikingly beautiful, black-on-white pottery, painted with humans, animals, mythic creatures, and bold, geometric patterns. 
 
Winnebago women wove, twined, and braided a variety of natural materials into bags, sashes, and mats. Combining twisting and weaving techniques, Winnebago women made bags to carry and store sacred charms and household goods.
 
The Acoma Pueblo in New Mexico is known for strong, thin-walled pottery decorated with geometric designs.
 

Bureau Of Indian Affairs 

On March 11, 1824, US Secretary of War John C. Calhoun created the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Among the first acts of the new Continental Congress in 1775 was the creation of three departments of Indian affairs: northern, central, and southern. Benjamin Franklin and Patrick Henry served as some of the early commissioners of these departments, tasked with negotiating treaties with Native American tribes. Their goal was to establish tribal neutrality in the Revolutionary War.

In 1789, the US Congress created the War Department and included Native American relations as part of its duties. Then in 1806, the Office of Indian Trade was established to oversee the fur-trading network, which included some control in Native American territories.

When this system ended in 1822, there was a gap in Native American relations. US Secretary of War John C. Calhoun sought to bridge that gap by creating the Bureau of Indian Affairs on March 11, 1824. It was a division within his Department of War and he created it without authorization from Congress. Because he had created the office in this way, Calhoun retained authority over the office, while the bureau’s superintendent had little power. It would take five years before a bill passed in both houses giving the president the authority to appoint a Commissioner of Indian Affairs to officially direct and manage all government matters relating to Native Americans.

In 1849, the office was transferred to the US Department of the Interior, which brought about several changes in policy and responsibilities. Over the years, tribes that had been moved to reservations suffered from diseases and starvation, leading the bureau to start providing food and supplies. However, by the 1860s, a series of corrupt bureau agents failed to do their jobs properly, leading to widespread hostility on the reservations.

So in 1867, Congress created a Peace Commission to examine the issues and suggest changes. Among their many suggestions was the appointment of more honest agents. While this change was made, their suggestion of removing the bureau from the Interior Department never happened. In the coming years, the bureau had a larger influence on reservations – running schools, participating in law enforcement, handing out supplies, and leasing contracts.

The bureau continued on this path until 1938 when the Merriam Report revealed that they weren’t properly providing services to reservations. Congress then passed the Indian Reorganization Act to help boost the tribal economies and governments. The bureau also expanded its services to include forestry, range management, and construction. The bureau’s services continued to expand until the 1960s, when some of these duties, such as education and healthcare, were passed to other departments.

Since the 1970s, the bureau has followed a policy of self-determination, promoting tribal resources and rights and their ability to manage their own governments. The current mission of the bureau is to “enhance the quality of life, to promote economic opportunity, and to carry out the responsibility to protect and improve the trust assets of American Indians, Indian tribes, and Alaska Natives.”

Click here for more stamps honoring Native Americans.

Click here to view the bureau’s website.

 
 
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U.S. #3873
2004 37¢ Art of American Indian

 

 

Issue Date: August 21, 2004
City: Santa Fe, NM
Quantity: 8,700,000
Printed By: Avery Dennison
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: 10 ¾ x 11
Color: Multicolored
 
These stamps provide examples of the artistic talent that American Indians from all parts of the country applied to everyday and ceremonial objects. Native craftspeople used the natural resources of each area – plant and animal fibers, clay, stone, and wood – to create distinctive and enduring designs. 
 
The California and Intermountain Indians made beautiful, finely woven baskets that they used for the gathering, storing, and cooking of food.
 
The Iroquois used containers made of bark, and they carved bowls, ladles, and other utensils from wood. In their hands, common wooden utensils became works of art.
 
Mississippian craftsmen achieved remarkable results with natural materials. Stone and clay objects were often shaped in the form of effigies (images of people or animals).
 
To carry and store their belongings, Plains Indian women fashioned cases from raw animal hide. These folded or sewn rawhide envelopes, “parfleches,” were light, rigid, and strong, colorfully painted in geometric patterns.
 
Skilled Tlingit carvers cut natural and symbolic faces and figures into canoe prows, totem poles, door posts, food utensils, storage and cooking boxes, ceremonial masks, and screen partitions. Large totem poles, carved from cedar trunks, stood in front of homes and told the story of the mother’s clan, or a legend or event.
 
Florida Seminole women decorated their garments with sewn-on bands of cloth. When white traders introduced hand-operated sewing machines, more intricate patterns became possible. Dolls dressed in traditional Seminole “patchwork” clothes were sold to tourists.
 
Skilled Navajo craftworkers are famous for their beautiful turquoise and silver jewelry and their finely woven blankets and rugs.
 
The Mimbres of the Classic period made strikingly beautiful, black-on-white pottery, painted with humans, animals, mythic creatures, and bold, geometric patterns. 
 
Winnebago women wove, twined, and braided a variety of natural materials into bags, sashes, and mats. Combining twisting and weaving techniques, Winnebago women made bags to carry and store sacred charms and household goods.
 
The Acoma Pueblo in New Mexico is known for strong, thin-walled pottery decorated with geometric designs.
 

Bureau Of Indian Affairs 

On March 11, 1824, US Secretary of War John C. Calhoun created the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Among the first acts of the new Continental Congress in 1775 was the creation of three departments of Indian affairs: northern, central, and southern. Benjamin Franklin and Patrick Henry served as some of the early commissioners of these departments, tasked with negotiating treaties with Native American tribes. Their goal was to establish tribal neutrality in the Revolutionary War.

In 1789, the US Congress created the War Department and included Native American relations as part of its duties. Then in 1806, the Office of Indian Trade was established to oversee the fur-trading network, which included some control in Native American territories.

When this system ended in 1822, there was a gap in Native American relations. US Secretary of War John C. Calhoun sought to bridge that gap by creating the Bureau of Indian Affairs on March 11, 1824. It was a division within his Department of War and he created it without authorization from Congress. Because he had created the office in this way, Calhoun retained authority over the office, while the bureau’s superintendent had little power. It would take five years before a bill passed in both houses giving the president the authority to appoint a Commissioner of Indian Affairs to officially direct and manage all government matters relating to Native Americans.

In 1849, the office was transferred to the US Department of the Interior, which brought about several changes in policy and responsibilities. Over the years, tribes that had been moved to reservations suffered from diseases and starvation, leading the bureau to start providing food and supplies. However, by the 1860s, a series of corrupt bureau agents failed to do their jobs properly, leading to widespread hostility on the reservations.

So in 1867, Congress created a Peace Commission to examine the issues and suggest changes. Among their many suggestions was the appointment of more honest agents. While this change was made, their suggestion of removing the bureau from the Interior Department never happened. In the coming years, the bureau had a larger influence on reservations – running schools, participating in law enforcement, handing out supplies, and leasing contracts.

The bureau continued on this path until 1938 when the Merriam Report revealed that they weren’t properly providing services to reservations. Congress then passed the Indian Reorganization Act to help boost the tribal economies and governments. The bureau also expanded its services to include forestry, range management, and construction. The bureau’s services continued to expand until the 1960s, when some of these duties, such as education and healthcare, were passed to other departments.

Since the 1970s, the bureau has followed a policy of self-determination, promoting tribal resources and rights and their ability to manage their own governments. The current mission of the bureau is to “enhance the quality of life, to promote economic opportunity, and to carry out the responsibility to protect and improve the trust assets of American Indians, Indian tribes, and Alaska Natives.”

Click here for more stamps honoring Native Americans.

Click here to view the bureau’s website.