#565 – 1923 14c American Indian, deep blue

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$9.00FREE with 2,720 points!
$9.00
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$2.00FREE with 440 points!
$2.00
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$6.25
$6.25
- Used Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.20FREE with 300 points!
$1.20
12 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636215x30mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM50327x30mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420027x30mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #565
Series of 1922-25
14¢ American Indian

Issue Date:
May 1, 1923
First City: Muskogee, OK and Washington, DC
Issue Quantity: 151,114,177
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Flat plate
Perforations: 11
Color:  Deep blue
  
Hollow Horn Bear
Although the inscription beneath the portrait simply reads "American Indian," this stamp actually pictures Hollow Horn Bear, a Brule Sioux Indian chief. In 1889, as a spokesman for his people, he negotiated several agreements with General George Crook who was attempting to break up the large reservations. He is well-known among American Indians for trying to protect the Indian's basic rights. In 1905 he rode in Teddy Roosevelt's inaugural parade, proudly representing all Indians of the West.
 

Bureau Of Indian Affairs 

On March 11, 1824, US Secretary of War John C. Calhoun created the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Among the first acts of the new Continental Congress in 1775 was the creation of three departments of Indian affairs: northern, central, and southern. Benjamin Franklin and Patrick Henry served as some of the early commissioners of these departments, tasked with negotiating treaties with Native American tribes. Their goal was to establish tribal neutrality in the Revolutionary War.

In 1789, the US Congress created the War Department and included Native American relations as part of its duties. Then in 1806, the Office of Indian Trade was established to oversee the fur-trading network, which included some control in Native American territories.

When this system ended in 1822, there was a gap in Native American relations. US Secretary of War John C. Calhoun sought to bridge that gap by creating the Bureau of Indian Affairs on March 11, 1824. It was a division within his Department of War and he created it without authorization from Congress. Because he had created the office in this way, Calhoun retained authority over the office, while the bureau’s superintendent had little power. It would take five years before a bill passed in both houses giving the president the authority to appoint a Commissioner of Indian Affairs to officially direct and manage all government matters relating to Native Americans.

In 1849, the office was transferred to the US Department of the Interior, which brought about several changes in policy and responsibilities. Over the years, tribes that had been moved to reservations suffered from diseases and starvation, leading the bureau to start providing food and supplies. However, by the 1860s, a series of corrupt bureau agents failed to do their jobs properly, leading to widespread hostility on the reservations.

So in 1867, Congress created a Peace Commission to examine the issues and suggest changes. Among their many suggestions was the appointment of more honest agents. While this change was made, their suggestion of removing the bureau from the Interior Department never happened. In the coming years, the bureau had a larger influence on reservations – running schools, participating in law enforcement, handing out supplies, and leasing contracts.

The bureau continued on this path until 1938 when the Merriam Report revealed that they weren’t properly providing services to reservations. Congress then passed the Indian Reorganization Act to help boost the tribal economies and governments. The bureau also expanded its services to include forestry, range management, and construction. The bureau’s services continued to expand until the 1960s, when some of these duties, such as education and healthcare, were passed to other departments.

Since the 1970s, the bureau has followed a policy of self-determination, promoting tribal resources and rights and their ability to manage their own governments. The current mission of the bureau is to “enhance the quality of life, to promote economic opportunity, and to carry out the responsibility to protect and improve the trust assets of American Indians, Indian tribes, and Alaska Natives.”

Click here for more stamps honoring Native Americans.

Click here to view the bureau’s website.

 
Read More - Click Here


  • 2020 First-Class Forever Stamp - Holiday Delights 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Holiday Delights

    In 2020, the United States Postal Service issued a set of 4 new Forever stamps picturing Holiday Delights.  Add these popular stamps to your collection now!

    $4.50- $21.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2019 Giant US Commemorative Collection, 212 mint stamps 2019 Giant US Commemorative Collection of 212 Mint Stamps
    Save time and money with this year-set.  You'll receive every US commemorative stamp with a major Scott number issued in 2019 in one order.  Plus, get the seven mint sheets pictured in our 2019 Heirloom Supplement.  It's the easy way to keep your collection up to date. 
    $219.95
    BUY NOW
  • US Definitive Collection - 650 Used Stamps US Definitive Collection - 650 Used Stamps
    Act now to get an instant collection of 650 used U.S. definitive stamps in one easy order! Definitive stamps are the backbone of the U.S. postal system and essential additions to your collection. Take advantage of this money-saving offer and make your collection grow fast.
    $32.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #565
Series of 1922-25
14¢ American Indian

Issue Date:
May 1, 1923
First City: Muskogee, OK and Washington, DC
Issue Quantity: 151,114,177
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Flat plate
Perforations: 11
Color:  Deep blue
  
Hollow Horn Bear
Although the inscription beneath the portrait simply reads "American Indian," this stamp actually pictures Hollow Horn Bear, a Brule Sioux Indian chief. In 1889, as a spokesman for his people, he negotiated several agreements with General George Crook who was attempting to break up the large reservations. He is well-known among American Indians for trying to protect the Indian's basic rights. In 1905 he rode in Teddy Roosevelt's inaugural parade, proudly representing all Indians of the West.
 

Bureau Of Indian Affairs 

On March 11, 1824, US Secretary of War John C. Calhoun created the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Among the first acts of the new Continental Congress in 1775 was the creation of three departments of Indian affairs: northern, central, and southern. Benjamin Franklin and Patrick Henry served as some of the early commissioners of these departments, tasked with negotiating treaties with Native American tribes. Their goal was to establish tribal neutrality in the Revolutionary War.

In 1789, the US Congress created the War Department and included Native American relations as part of its duties. Then in 1806, the Office of Indian Trade was established to oversee the fur-trading network, which included some control in Native American territories.

When this system ended in 1822, there was a gap in Native American relations. US Secretary of War John C. Calhoun sought to bridge that gap by creating the Bureau of Indian Affairs on March 11, 1824. It was a division within his Department of War and he created it without authorization from Congress. Because he had created the office in this way, Calhoun retained authority over the office, while the bureau’s superintendent had little power. It would take five years before a bill passed in both houses giving the president the authority to appoint a Commissioner of Indian Affairs to officially direct and manage all government matters relating to Native Americans.

In 1849, the office was transferred to the US Department of the Interior, which brought about several changes in policy and responsibilities. Over the years, tribes that had been moved to reservations suffered from diseases and starvation, leading the bureau to start providing food and supplies. However, by the 1860s, a series of corrupt bureau agents failed to do their jobs properly, leading to widespread hostility on the reservations.

So in 1867, Congress created a Peace Commission to examine the issues and suggest changes. Among their many suggestions was the appointment of more honest agents. While this change was made, their suggestion of removing the bureau from the Interior Department never happened. In the coming years, the bureau had a larger influence on reservations – running schools, participating in law enforcement, handing out supplies, and leasing contracts.

The bureau continued on this path until 1938 when the Merriam Report revealed that they weren’t properly providing services to reservations. Congress then passed the Indian Reorganization Act to help boost the tribal economies and governments. The bureau also expanded its services to include forestry, range management, and construction. The bureau’s services continued to expand until the 1960s, when some of these duties, such as education and healthcare, were passed to other departments.

Since the 1970s, the bureau has followed a policy of self-determination, promoting tribal resources and rights and their ability to manage their own governments. The current mission of the bureau is to “enhance the quality of life, to promote economic opportunity, and to carry out the responsibility to protect and improve the trust assets of American Indians, Indian tribes, and Alaska Natives.”

Click here for more stamps honoring Native Americans.

Click here to view the bureau’s website.