#4224-27 – 2008 41c American Scientists

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U.S. #4224-27
41¢ American Scientists
 
Issue Date:  March 6, 2008
City:  New York, NY

American scientists have kept our country at the forefront of technology in areas like medicine, space, and the military.  In  2008, the United States Postal Service honored four American Scientists with 41¢ first-class postage stamps to recognize their important contributions to our nation.  It is the second se-tenant issued in the American Scientists Series.  Featured on stamps are biochemist Gerty Cori, chemist Linus Pauling, astronomer Edwin Hubble, and physicist John Bardeen. 
 
Gerti Cori was the first female to earn a Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine in 1947.  Working with her husband, Cori discovered how carbohydrates are metabolized in the body.  The Cori Crater on the Moon was named for her. 
 
Linus Pauling is considered by most to be the father of molecular biology.  He earned two Nobel Prizes, one for chemistry in 1954 and one for Peace in 1962.  The Linus Pauling Institute was started and later named after Pauling. 
 
Astronomer Edwin Hubble forever changed the way we see our world.  Before Hubble, it was thought that our Milky Way galaxy was the entire universe.  Hubble’s research showed there are galaxies beyond our own.  In 1990, the Hubble telescope was named after the distinguished astronomer. 
 
John Bardeen’s development of the transistor has made possible the creation of almost every other modern electronic device from telephones to missiles.  He earned Nobel Prizes in 1956 and 1972 for his world-changing contributions.
 
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U.S. #4224-27
41¢ American Scientists
 
Issue Date:  March 6, 2008
City:  New York, NY

American scientists have kept our country at the forefront of technology in areas like medicine, space, and the military.  In  2008, the United States Postal Service honored four American Scientists with 41¢ first-class postage stamps to recognize their important contributions to our nation.  It is the second se-tenant issued in the American Scientists Series.  Featured on stamps are biochemist Gerty Cori, chemist Linus Pauling, astronomer Edwin Hubble, and physicist John Bardeen. 
 
Gerti Cori was the first female to earn a Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine in 1947.  Working with her husband, Cori discovered how carbohydrates are metabolized in the body.  The Cori Crater on the Moon was named for her. 
 
Linus Pauling is considered by most to be the father of molecular biology.  He earned two Nobel Prizes, one for chemistry in 1954 and one for Peace in 1962.  The Linus Pauling Institute was started and later named after Pauling. 
 
Astronomer Edwin Hubble forever changed the way we see our world.  Before Hubble, it was thought that our Milky Way galaxy was the entire universe.  Hubble’s research showed there are galaxies beyond our own.  In 1990, the Hubble telescope was named after the distinguished astronomer. 
 
John Bardeen’s development of the transistor has made possible the creation of almost every other modern electronic device from telephones to missiles.  He earned Nobel Prizes in 1956 and 1972 for his world-changing contributions.