#4492 – 2011 First-Class Forever Stamp - Chinese Lunar New Year: Year of Rabbit

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U.S. #4492

2011 44¢ Year of the Rabbit

Lunar New Year Series


Issue Date: January 22, 2011

City: Morrow, GA

Printed By: Avery Dennison

Printing Method: Photogravure

Color: Multicolored

The Year of the Rabbit should bring a soothing change from the chaos often encountered in the preceding Year of the Tiger (a sign that can be impulsive and rebellious). People born in the Year of the Rabbit are believed to be graceful, thoughtful, and calm, but sometimes can appear aloof or passive.
 
In 2011, the Year of the Rabbit begins on February 3rd. Each Lunar New Year starts on a different date. The term “lunar” isn’t precisely correct, as the calendar is called lunisolar and calculated by the movements of the sun and the moon. The New Year celebration – also known as the Spring Festival – is the most important holiday in Chinese culture.
 
One symbol of the New Year is the kumquat, a fruit that resembles a miniature orange. The rind is sweet, and a delightful complement to the bitter pulp. Candied kumquats are a popular New Year treat. 
 
Kumquats are symbols of the Lunar New Year for reasons beyond their taste. In Chinese society, words often have symbolism not only for what they mean, but what they sound like, or can be connected to. The word “kumquat” is based on the Cantonese words kam (gold) and kwat (orange). Gold refers to good fortune and orange suggests vitality. Kumquats are given in pairs as gifts during the New Year, since two is a very lucky Chinese number.
 
 
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U.S. #4492

2011 44¢ Year of the Rabbit

Lunar New Year Series


Issue Date: January 22, 2011

City: Morrow, GA

Printed By: Avery Dennison

Printing Method: Photogravure

Color: Multicolored


The Year of the Rabbit should bring a soothing change from the chaos often encountered in the preceding Year of the Tiger (a sign that can be impulsive and rebellious). People born in the Year of the Rabbit are believed to be graceful, thoughtful, and calm, but sometimes can appear aloof or passive.
 
In 2011, the Year of the Rabbit begins on February 3rd. Each Lunar New Year starts on a different date. The term “lunar” isn’t precisely correct, as the calendar is called lunisolar and calculated by the movements of the sun and the moon. The New Year celebration – also known as the Spring Festival – is the most important holiday in Chinese culture.
 
One symbol of the New Year is the kumquat, a fruit that resembles a miniature orange. The rind is sweet, and a delightful complement to the bitter pulp. Candied kumquats are a popular New Year treat. 
 
Kumquats are symbols of the Lunar New Year for reasons beyond their taste. In Chinese society, words often have symbolism not only for what they mean, but what they sound like, or can be connected to. The word “kumquat” is based on the Cantonese words kam (gold) and kwat (orange). Gold refers to good fortune and orange suggests vitality. Kumquats are given in pairs as gifts during the New Year, since two is a very lucky Chinese number.