#4804 – 2013 First-Class Forever Stamp - The 1963 March on Washington

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U.S. # 4804
2013 46¢ March on Washington

Civil Rights

 

On a hot August day in the summer of 1963, over 250,000 demonstrators filled the nation’s capital with one goal in mind – racial equality.

 

Tensions ran high during the 1960s as segregation and violence against African Americans were spreading unchecked in the South. Civil rights demonstrations calling for equality swept the nation. The most famous was the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

 

The march was organized by the “Big Six” – civil rights leaders including Martin Luther King, Jr., A. Philip Randolph, and John Lewis. Among the stated goals of the day were: passing civil rights legislation, ending segregation in schools, protecting against police brutality, and increasing access to jobs.

 

Several popular entertainers also turned out to perform in support of the cause, including Marian Anderson, Joan Baez, and Bob Dylan. The most noted event of the day was the “I Have a Dream” speech by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

The largest demonstration ever held in the nation’s capital up to that time, the March on Washington was widely televised and gained national attention. It was largely responsible for the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. This major success was a crucial step in granting the equal rights Americans enjoy today.

 

Commemorating the 50th anniversary of the march, U.S. #4804 features a painting by Gregory Manchess of marchers calling for equal rights in front of the Washington Monument.

 

Value: 46¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate

Issued:  August 23, 2013

First Day City:  Washington, D.C.

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Avery Dennison
Method: Photogravure printing in sheets of 200 in 10 panes of 20
Perforation: Serpentine Die Cut 10 ¾  

Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed: 59,000,000 stamps

This stamp was the third and final Civil Rights issue of 2013.  The others honored the Emancipation Proclamation (U.S. #4721) and Rosa Parks (U.S. #4742). 

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U.S. # 4804
2013 46¢ March on Washington

Civil Rights

 

On a hot August day in the summer of 1963, over 250,000 demonstrators filled the nation’s capital with one goal in mind – racial equality.

 

Tensions ran high during the 1960s as segregation and violence against African Americans were spreading unchecked in the South. Civil rights demonstrations calling for equality swept the nation. The most famous was the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

 

The march was organized by the “Big Six” – civil rights leaders including Martin Luther King, Jr., A. Philip Randolph, and John Lewis. Among the stated goals of the day were: passing civil rights legislation, ending segregation in schools, protecting against police brutality, and increasing access to jobs.

 

Several popular entertainers also turned out to perform in support of the cause, including Marian Anderson, Joan Baez, and Bob Dylan. The most noted event of the day was the “I Have a Dream” speech by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

The largest demonstration ever held in the nation’s capital up to that time, the March on Washington was widely televised and gained national attention. It was largely responsible for the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. This major success was a crucial step in granting the equal rights Americans enjoy today.

 

Commemorating the 50th anniversary of the march, U.S. #4804 features a painting by Gregory Manchess of marchers calling for equal rights in front of the Washington Monument.

 

Value: 46¢ 1-ounce first-class letter rate

Issued:  August 23, 2013

First Day City:  Washington, D.C.

Type of Stamp: Commemorative
Printed by:
Avery Dennison
Method: Photogravure printing in sheets of 200 in 10 panes of 20
Perforation: Serpentine Die Cut 10 ¾  

Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed: 59,000,000 stamps

This stamp was the third and final Civil Rights issue of 2013.  The others honored the Emancipation Proclamation (U.S. #4721) and Rosa Parks (U.S. #4742).