#4908 – 2014 First-Class Forever Stamp - Hot Rods: Rear of 1932 Ford "Deuce" Roadster

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U.S. #4908
2014 49¢ Rear of 1932 Ford “Deuce” Roadster
Hot Rods
 
This stamp is one of two issued at the National Street Rod Association’s “Street Rod Nationals East Plus.” It pictures the rear of a 1932 Ford Deuce roadster.
 
Hot rod cars are uniquely American... and their evolution mirrors our nation’s history during the 20th century. Today, hot rods have shed their bad-boy reputation and given birth to a thriving industry. These classics fetch prices ranging from a few thousand to nearly a million dollars.
 
Loosely defined, hot rods are older, classic American cars with large engines that have been altered to give them higher performance. The practice began on the West Coast during the 1920s, where modified cars were raced across empty lakebeds. As the competition grew, so did the need to make the cars lighter, leaner, and faster. Some of the techniques were borrowed from moonshiners, who had refitted their vehicles to outrun the “revenuers” during Prohibition.
 
Many soldiers returning from World War II had learned technical skills, and used them to do their own modifications. Convertible tops, hoods, bumpers, windshields and fenders were often removed to reduce resistance, while motors were tuned or even replaced with more powerful engines.
 
Drag racing in hot rods became very popular during the ‘50s, inspiring hit songs, glossy magazines, and a certain way of dressing. Today, officially sanctioned races and celebrity owners make hot rods appealing to all age groups and economic classes. 
 
The Hot Rods stamps were digitally created by John Mattos. His art appeared on a U.S. stamp for the first time in 2006 (#3995 – Winter Olympics). Mattos, a graphic artist, is known for his art deco style.
 
49¢ Hot Rods, issued to satisfy the first-class mail rate
Issue Date: June 6, 2014
City: York, PA, at the National Street Rod Association’s “Street Rod Nationals East Plus.”
Quantity: 50,000,000
Category: Definitive
Printed By: CCL Label Inc.
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: Serpentine Die Cut 11 ¾ X 11 ¼
Self-adhesive
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U.S. #4908
2014 49¢ Rear of 1932 Ford “Deuce” Roadster
Hot Rods
 
This stamp is one of two issued at the National Street Rod Association’s “Street Rod Nationals East Plus.” It pictures the rear of a 1932 Ford Deuce roadster.
 
Hot rod cars are uniquely American... and their evolution mirrors our nation’s history during the 20th century. Today, hot rods have shed their bad-boy reputation and given birth to a thriving industry. These classics fetch prices ranging from a few thousand to nearly a million dollars.
 
Loosely defined, hot rods are older, classic American cars with large engines that have been altered to give them higher performance. The practice began on the West Coast during the 1920s, where modified cars were raced across empty lakebeds. As the competition grew, so did the need to make the cars lighter, leaner, and faster. Some of the techniques were borrowed from moonshiners, who had refitted their vehicles to outrun the “revenuers” during Prohibition.
 
Many soldiers returning from World War II had learned technical skills, and used them to do their own modifications. Convertible tops, hoods, bumpers, windshields and fenders were often removed to reduce resistance, while motors were tuned or even replaced with more powerful engines.
 
Drag racing in hot rods became very popular during the ‘50s, inspiring hit songs, glossy magazines, and a certain way of dressing. Today, officially sanctioned races and celebrity owners make hot rods appealing to all age groups and economic classes. 
 
The Hot Rods stamps were digitally created by John Mattos. His art appeared on a U.S. stamp for the first time in 2006 (#3995 – Winter Olympics). Mattos, a graphic artist, is known for his art deco style.
 
49¢ Hot Rods, issued to satisfy the first-class mail rate
Issue Date: June 6, 2014
City: York, PA, at the National Street Rod Association’s “Street Rod Nationals East Plus.”
Quantity: 50,000,000
Category: Definitive
Printed By: CCL Label Inc.
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: Serpentine Die Cut 11 ¾ X 11 ¼
Self-adhesive