#4909 – 2014 First-Class Forever Stamp - Hot Rods: Front of 1932 Ford "Deuce" Roadster

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U.S. #4909
2014 49¢ Front of 1932 Ford “Deuce” Roadster
Hot Rods
 
This stamp is one of two issued at the National Street Rod Association’s “Street Rod Nationals East Plus.” It pictures the front of a 1932 Ford Deuce roadster.
 
Hot rods were born in Southern California’s dry lakebeds during the late 1920s. Located a few hours from Los Angeles, these open areas were free of obstructions, making them ideal for racing. Teens flocked to race at spots like El Mirage, where speeds sometimes reached 100 miles per hour. Those who couldn’t make the trip simply raced on the streets of Los Angeles, defying both their parents and the police. 
 
Ford Models A and T were preferred at first because they were inexpensive and lightweight. Unnecessary equipment was stripped, the bodies were lowered, special mufflers were used to create a “burble” sound, and custom headlights were added. Much of the work was done by amateur mechanics, but competition to go faster and look cooler gave rise to an industry devoted to creating highly customized cars.
 
The ‘50s were the golden age of hot rods. Cruising from one drive-in to another was a way for teens to showcase their cars and find a competitor to drag race. The National Hot Rod Association helped move the sport into mainstream by promoting safety. The NHRA took the lead, moving racing from the streets and establishing classes where vehicles competed based on weight, body style, engine displacement, and cylinders. Today, thousands of fans flock to NHRA races, where hot rods can exceed speeds of 300 miles per hour.
 
The Hot Rods stamps were digitally created by John Mattos. His art appeared on a U.S. stamp for the first time in 2006 (#3995 – Winter Olympics). Mattos, a graphic artist, is known for his art deco style.
 
49¢ Hot Rods, issued to satisfy the first-class mail rate
Issue Date: June 6, 2014
City: York, PA, at the National Street Rod Association’s “Street Rod Nationals East Plus.”
Quantity: 50,000,000
Category: Definitive
Printed By: CCL Label Inc.
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: Serpentine Die Cut 11 ¾ X 11 ¼
Self-adhesive
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U.S. #4909
2014 49¢ Front of 1932 Ford “Deuce” Roadster
Hot Rods
 
This stamp is one of two issued at the National Street Rod Association’s “Street Rod Nationals East Plus.” It pictures the front of a 1932 Ford Deuce roadster.
 
Hot rods were born in Southern California’s dry lakebeds during the late 1920s. Located a few hours from Los Angeles, these open areas were free of obstructions, making them ideal for racing. Teens flocked to race at spots like El Mirage, where speeds sometimes reached 100 miles per hour. Those who couldn’t make the trip simply raced on the streets of Los Angeles, defying both their parents and the police. 
 
Ford Models A and T were preferred at first because they were inexpensive and lightweight. Unnecessary equipment was stripped, the bodies were lowered, special mufflers were used to create a “burble” sound, and custom headlights were added. Much of the work was done by amateur mechanics, but competition to go faster and look cooler gave rise to an industry devoted to creating highly customized cars.
 
The ‘50s were the golden age of hot rods. Cruising from one drive-in to another was a way for teens to showcase their cars and find a competitor to drag race. The National Hot Rod Association helped move the sport into mainstream by promoting safety. The NHRA took the lead, moving racing from the streets and establishing classes where vehicles competed based on weight, body style, engine displacement, and cylinders. Today, thousands of fans flock to NHRA races, where hot rods can exceed speeds of 300 miles per hour.
 
The Hot Rods stamps were digitally created by John Mattos. His art appeared on a U.S. stamp for the first time in 2006 (#3995 – Winter Olympics). Mattos, a graphic artist, is known for his art deco style.
 
49¢ Hot Rods, issued to satisfy the first-class mail rate
Issue Date: June 6, 2014
City: York, PA, at the National Street Rod Association’s “Street Rod Nationals East Plus.”
Quantity: 50,000,000
Category: Definitive
Printed By: CCL Label Inc.
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: Serpentine Die Cut 11 ¾ X 11 ¼
Self-adhesive