#904 – 1942 3c Kentucky Statehood

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U.S. #904
3¢ Kentucky Statehood

Issue Date: June 1, 1942
City: Frankfort, KY
Quantity: 63,558,400
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10.5
Color: Violet
 
Issued to commemorate Kentucky’s 150th anniversary of statehood, U.S. #904 pictures a mural by Gilbert White from the capitol building in Frankfort. The stamp shows Daniel Boone and three others looking across the Kentucky River to the shore where Frankfort, the capitol city, is located. 
 
Kentucky – America’s 15th State
During the late 1600s and early 1700s, many explorers from England and France traveled through the Kentucky region.  In 1750, Thomas Walker conducted the first extensive European exploration of the eastern portion of Kentucky. The legendary Daniel Boone explored eastern Kentucky in 1767 and again in 1769, when he spent two years living in the Bluegrass region. In 1773, Boone attempted to lead a group of settlers into the area, but Indians prevented it. In 1774, a group of colonists from Pennsylvania, led by James Harrod, established the first permanent white settlement in Kentucky, called Harrodsburg. Soon after, Boone established Boonesborough along the Kentucky River. The route Boone took into Kentucky became known as the “Wilderness Road.”
 
Separated from the American colonies by mountains and forests, Kentucky was very remote. As the American Revolution raged in the colonies, Kentucky was left susceptible to attacks from Indians who were armed by the British. Under the capable leadership of Boone, Simon Kenton, and George Rogers Clark, the Kentucky settlers were able to defend themselves. In 1776, Kentucky became a county of Virginia. Many settlers from Virginia moved to the area, which prompted an increase in Indian attacks. In 1778, George Rogers Clark led a small group of colonists against the British settlements that were responsible for supplying arms to the Indians. This action was successful, and greatly reduced the number of attacks against the Kentucky colonists.
 
In May 1792, Kentucky adopted a constitution and prepared for statehood. Statehood was achieved June 1, 1792. Isaac Shelby, a hero of the Revolutionary War, helped to frame Kentucky’s constitution and became the state’s first governor.
 
FDR – The Stamp-Collecting President
President Franklin Roosevelt was instrumental in the design and issuance of U.S. #904. Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s mother introduced the future President to stamp collecting at a young age. Throughout his life, he turned to his collection to relax and unwind. 
 
Roosevelt was elected President four times, serving in the nation’s highest office longer than any other chief executive – 12 years. During those 12 years, Roosevelt promoted the importance of stamps by personally approving each of more than 200 stamp designs. This included suggesting topics, rejecting others, and even designing some of the stamps himself. He used U.S. postage stamps to educate Americans about their heritage, to buoy war-weary spirits during World War II, and to send a message of peace and hope as Europe faced the overwhelming task of rebuilding.
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U.S. #904
3¢ Kentucky Statehood

Issue Date: June 1, 1942
City: Frankfort, KY
Quantity: 63,558,400
Printed by: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:
11 x 10.5
Color: Violet
 
Issued to commemorate Kentucky’s 150th anniversary of statehood, U.S. #904 pictures a mural by Gilbert White from the capitol building in Frankfort. The stamp shows Daniel Boone and three others looking across the Kentucky River to the shore where Frankfort, the capitol city, is located. 
 
Kentucky – America’s 15th State
During the late 1600s and early 1700s, many explorers from England and France traveled through the Kentucky region.  In 1750, Thomas Walker conducted the first extensive European exploration of the eastern portion of Kentucky. The legendary Daniel Boone explored eastern Kentucky in 1767 and again in 1769, when he spent two years living in the Bluegrass region. In 1773, Boone attempted to lead a group of settlers into the area, but Indians prevented it. In 1774, a group of colonists from Pennsylvania, led by James Harrod, established the first permanent white settlement in Kentucky, called Harrodsburg. Soon after, Boone established Boonesborough along the Kentucky River. The route Boone took into Kentucky became known as the “Wilderness Road.”
 
Separated from the American colonies by mountains and forests, Kentucky was very remote. As the American Revolution raged in the colonies, Kentucky was left susceptible to attacks from Indians who were armed by the British. Under the capable leadership of Boone, Simon Kenton, and George Rogers Clark, the Kentucky settlers were able to defend themselves. In 1776, Kentucky became a county of Virginia. Many settlers from Virginia moved to the area, which prompted an increase in Indian attacks. In 1778, George Rogers Clark led a small group of colonists against the British settlements that were responsible for supplying arms to the Indians. This action was successful, and greatly reduced the number of attacks against the Kentucky colonists.
 
In May 1792, Kentucky adopted a constitution and prepared for statehood. Statehood was achieved June 1, 1792. Isaac Shelby, a hero of the Revolutionary War, helped to frame Kentucky’s constitution and became the state’s first governor.
 
FDR – The Stamp-Collecting President
President Franklin Roosevelt was instrumental in the design and issuance of U.S. #904. Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s mother introduced the future President to stamp collecting at a young age. Throughout his life, he turned to his collection to relax and unwind. 
 
Roosevelt was elected President four times, serving in the nation’s highest office longer than any other chief executive – 12 years. During those 12 years, Roosevelt promoted the importance of stamps by personally approving each of more than 200 stamp designs. This included suggesting topics, rejecting others, and even designing some of the stamps himself. He used U.S. postage stamps to educate Americans about their heritage, to buoy war-weary spirits during World War II, and to send a message of peace and hope as Europe faced the overwhelming task of rebuilding.