#2636 – 1992 29c Kentucky Statehood

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.60FREE with 320 points!
$1.60
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.20
$0.20
6 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM637215x32mm 25 Horizontal Strip Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$7.95
$7.95
- MM420245x30mm 50 Horizontal Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM67145x32mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$4.25
$4.25
 
U.S. #2636
1992 29¢ Kentucky Statehood
   
Issue Date: June 1, 1992
City: Danville, KY
Quantity: 160,000,000
Printed By: J.W. Fergusson & Sons for Stamp Venturers
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: 11
Color: Multicolored
 
Featuring My Old Kentucky Home State Park, this stamp celebrated the 200th anniversary of Kentucky's statehood. The home shown on the stamp was immortalized in Stephen Foster's song "My Old Kentucky Home," which became the state's official song in 1928.
 

Death Of Stephen Foster 

On January 13, 1864, Stephen Foster, the “father of American music,” died in New York City.

Stephen Collins Foster was born on July 4, 1826, in Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania. The youngest of nine children, Foster attended private schools and taught himself to play the clarinet, violin, guitar, flute, and piano.

Foster never received a formal education in musical composition but wrote his first song, “Tioga Waltz,” when he was just 14 years old. He published his first song, “Open Thy Lattice Love,” three years later. Foster briefly attended college, but took a trip to Pittsburgh and never went back to school. Instead, he moved to Cincinnati, Ohio to work as a bookkeeper for his brother’s steamship company.

While in Cincinnati, Foster wrote his first successful songs between 1848 and 1849. Among these songs was “Oh! Susanna,” which became a popular anthem of the California Gold Rush. Also during this time, he published Foster’s Ethiopian Melodies, which included “Nelly Was a Lady,” popularized by the Christy Minstrels.

After that success, Foster moved back to Pennsylvania and signed a contract with the Christy Minstrels. This would lead to perhaps his most successful musical period. In the early 1850s, he wrote several now-famous songs, including “Camptown Races,” “Nelly By,” “Ring de Banjo,” “Old Folks at Home” (also known as “Swanee River”), “My Old Kentucky Home,” “Old Dog Tray,” and “Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair.” Many of Foster’s songs had southern themes, though he never lived there and only visited once.

After the Civil War broke out and Abraham Lincoln called for volunteers, Foster set the poem “We Are Coming, Father Abra’am” to music. There is little information about Foster’s final years, though he wrote the song “Beautiful Dreamer” sometime between 1862 and 1864. In January 1864, he had a bad fever and fell, suffering a gruesome wound. After he was discovered and taken to the hospital, Stephen Foster died on January 13, 1864, at just 37 years old.

In the years since his death, Foster’s music went on to become even more widespread and popular. Title 36 of the US Code names January 13 as Stephen Foster Memorial Day. There are two state parks named in his honor, and another in honor of one of his songs: My Old Kentucky Home State Park. “My Old Kentucky Home” is the state song of Kentucky and “Old Folks at Home” is the state song of Florida.

Click here to listen to some of Foster’s songs.

 
Read More - Click Here


  • 1940s First Day Covers, Collection of 60 1940s First Day Covers, Collection of 60

    The 1940s were packed with history, and this is your chance to add some of that history to your collection with 60 limited-edition First Day Covers.  You'll see Airmail stamps, commemorative stamps, and definitives.  Order yours now.

    $75.95
    BUY NOW
  • 2002 US Definitive Coll. set of 36, used 2002 US Definitive Collection, Used, 36 Stamps
    Now is a great time to add these stamps to your collection.  You’ll get 36 used stamps SAVE off the regular stamp prices.  Order your 2002 US Definitive Stamp Collection today.
    $6.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1887-98  Reg Issues, 12 stamps, used Classic Definitives, 12 stamps, Used

    Save time and effort with this collector's set of 12 postally used definitive stamps issued from 1887-1898.  These stamps are now all over 110 years old and represent a ton of neat history.  Order today and you'll receive 212, 219, 220, 222, 223, 226, 268, 272, 279, 280, 281 and 283.

    $30.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #2636
1992 29¢ Kentucky Statehood

 

 

Issue Date: June 1, 1992
City: Danville, KY
Quantity: 160,000,000
Printed By: J.W. Fergusson & Sons for Stamp Venturers
Printing Method: Photogravure
Perforations: 11
Color: Multicolored
 
Featuring My Old Kentucky Home State Park, this stamp celebrated the 200th anniversary of Kentucky's statehood. The home shown on the stamp was immortalized in Stephen Foster's song "My Old Kentucky Home," which became the state's official song in 1928.
 

Death Of Stephen Foster 

On January 13, 1864, Stephen Foster, the “father of American music,” died in New York City.

Stephen Collins Foster was born on July 4, 1826, in Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania. The youngest of nine children, Foster attended private schools and taught himself to play the clarinet, violin, guitar, flute, and piano.

Foster never received a formal education in musical composition but wrote his first song, “Tioga Waltz,” when he was just 14 years old. He published his first song, “Open Thy Lattice Love,” three years later. Foster briefly attended college, but took a trip to Pittsburgh and never went back to school. Instead, he moved to Cincinnati, Ohio to work as a bookkeeper for his brother’s steamship company.

While in Cincinnati, Foster wrote his first successful songs between 1848 and 1849. Among these songs was “Oh! Susanna,” which became a popular anthem of the California Gold Rush. Also during this time, he published Foster’s Ethiopian Melodies, which included “Nelly Was a Lady,” popularized by the Christy Minstrels.

After that success, Foster moved back to Pennsylvania and signed a contract with the Christy Minstrels. This would lead to perhaps his most successful musical period. In the early 1850s, he wrote several now-famous songs, including “Camptown Races,” “Nelly By,” “Ring de Banjo,” “Old Folks at Home” (also known as “Swanee River”), “My Old Kentucky Home,” “Old Dog Tray,” and “Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair.” Many of Foster’s songs had southern themes, though he never lived there and only visited once.

After the Civil War broke out and Abraham Lincoln called for volunteers, Foster set the poem “We Are Coming, Father Abra’am” to music. There is little information about Foster’s final years, though he wrote the song “Beautiful Dreamer” sometime between 1862 and 1864. In January 1864, he had a bad fever and fell, suffering a gruesome wound. After he was discovered and taken to the hospital, Stephen Foster died on January 13, 1864, at just 37 years old.

In the years since his death, Foster’s music went on to become even more widespread and popular. Title 36 of the US Code names January 13 as Stephen Foster Memorial Day. There are two state parks named in his honor, and another in honor of one of his songs: My Old Kentucky Home State Park. “My Old Kentucky Home” is the state song of Kentucky and “Old Folks at Home” is the state song of Florida.

Click here to listen to some of Foster’s songs.