#975 – 1948 3c Will Rogers

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- Mint Stamp(s)
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- MM50750 Vertical Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 30 x 34 millimeters (1-3/16 x 1-5/16 inches)
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U.S. #975
1948 3¢ Will Rogers Issue
 
Issue Date: November 4, 1948
City: Claremore, Oklahoma
Quantity: 67,162,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:  10 ½ x 11
Color: Bright red violet
 
U.S. #975 showcases “Oklahoma’s Favorite Son,” cowboy comedian Will Rogers. A popular humorist who also at one time was the highest-paid actor in Hollywood, Rogers’ tombstone bears one of his most famous quotes – “I never met a man I didn’t like.”
 
Will Rogers (1879-1935)
Cowboy, Humorist, and Social Critic
 Will Rogers was born on a large ranch near Oologah in Indian Territory, which became Oklahoma. Rogers, who was of partial Cherokee Indian ancestry, was taught to rope by a freed slave. He became skilled at roping, and performed at “Wild West” shows and in vaudeville. Rogers began telling stories and jokes to enhance his act, and soon his keen wit and observations became a bigger attraction than his roping skills. 
 
From this humble start, Rogers became an author, lecturer, motion picture actor, and radio commentator. Roger’s down-to-earth philosophy, folksy humor, and use of simple words were the keys to success. Rogers died in a plane crash while flying in Alaska with pioneer aviator Wiley Post. Post was surveying a mail-and-passenger route.
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U.S. #975
1948 3¢ Will Rogers Issue
 
Issue Date: November 4, 1948
City: Claremore, Oklahoma
Quantity: 67,162,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:  10 ½ x 11
Color: Bright red violet
 
U.S. #975 showcases “Oklahoma’s Favorite Son,” cowboy comedian Will Rogers. A popular humorist who also at one time was the highest-paid actor in Hollywood, Rogers’ tombstone bears one of his most famous quotes – “I never met a man I didn’t like.”
 
Will Rogers (1879-1935)
Cowboy, Humorist, and Social Critic
 Will Rogers was born on a large ranch near Oologah in Indian Territory, which became Oklahoma. Rogers, who was of partial Cherokee Indian ancestry, was taught to rope by a freed slave. He became skilled at roping, and performed at “Wild West” shows and in vaudeville. Rogers began telling stories and jokes to enhance his act, and soon his keen wit and observations became a bigger attraction than his roping skills. 
 
From this humble start, Rogers became an author, lecturer, motion picture actor, and radio commentator. Roger’s down-to-earth philosophy, folksy humor, and use of simple words were the keys to success. Rogers died in a plane crash while flying in Alaska with pioneer aviator Wiley Post. Post was surveying a mail-and-passenger route.