2010 Dominica Lunar Calendar 12v M

# M10651 - 2010 Dominica Lunar Calendar 12v M

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Mint Stamp Sheet Honors 30th Anniversary of
Chinese Lunar New Year Stamps
 
 
This mint stamp sheet was issued in honor of the first Chinese Lunar New Year stamps. In 1980, the China Post, the official postal authority of China, began a series of stamps based on the Lunar New Year. The response was extraordinary, and other countries around the world soon began issuing their own stamps. This sheet commemorates the 30th anniversary of that groundbreaking 1980 series.
 
These stamps share the art and traditions of a culture that’s thousands of years old. China’s calendar has been in use for about 5,000 years.  To put that in perspective, the Gregorian Calendar used in Western nations like the United States was formalized in 1582 – less than 430 years ago.     
 
Just think of the events that have been marked by China’s calendar! Each new year is a celebration of the culture that has lasted thousands of years. While in the West, we have a big party, watch the ball drop in Times Square, and maybe watch football the next day, the Chinese celebrate a new year with a party that lasts 15 days. Called the Spring Festival, it’s a time for new beginnings and making up for past errors or wrongs. 
 

 

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Mint Stamp Sheet Honors 30th Anniversary of
Chinese Lunar New Year Stamps
 
 
This mint stamp sheet was issued in honor of the first Chinese Lunar New Year stamps. In 1980, the China Post, the official postal authority of China, began a series of stamps based on the Lunar New Year. The response was extraordinary, and other countries around the world soon began issuing their own stamps. This sheet commemorates the 30th anniversary of that groundbreaking 1980 series.
 
These stamps share the art and traditions of a culture that’s thousands of years old. China’s calendar has been in use for about 5,000 years.  To put that in perspective, the Gregorian Calendar used in Western nations like the United States was formalized in 1582 – less than 430 years ago.     
 
Just think of the events that have been marked by China’s calendar! Each new year is a celebration of the culture that has lasted thousands of years. While in the West, we have a big party, watch the ball drop in Times Square, and maybe watch football the next day, the Chinese celebrate a new year with a party that lasts 15 days. Called the Spring Festival, it’s a time for new beginnings and making up for past errors or wrongs.