1987 22c Performing Arts: Enrico Caruso

# 2250 - 1987 22c Performing Arts: Enrico Caruso

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U.S. #2250
1987 22¢ Enrico Caruso
Performing Arts Series

  • 10th stamp in Performing Arts Series
  • Depicts Caruso in his favorite role, as the Duke of Manua in Rogoletto

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Series: 
Performing Arts
Value: 
22¢, first-class rate
First Day of Issue: 
February 27, 1987
First Day City: 
New York, New York
Quantity Issued: 
130,000,000
Printed by: 
American Bank Note Company
Printing Method: 
Photogravure
Format: 
Panes of 50 in sheets of 200
Perforations:  11

 

Why the stamp was issued:  To honor operatic tenor Enrico Caruso.

 

About the stamp design:  Jim Sharpe designed this stamp, as he had all previous stamps in the series.  He based Caruso’s portrait on several different photographs of the performer in his costume for the Duke of Manua in Rigoletto

 

Special design details:  The American Bank Note Company used two different paper suppliers for this stamp, resulting in slight color differences.  One of the papers has a yellowish hue while the other is more blue.

 

First Day City:  The First Day ceremony for this stamp was held at the Metropolitan Opera at Lincoln Center, in New York City, New York. 

 

Unusual fact about this stamp:  A very rare error exists with the black gravure printing omitted.  Only 10 such stamps have been reported to date.

 

About the Performing Arts Series:  The Performing Arts series ran from 1978 to 1987 and honored 12 performers of stage and screen including musicians and actors.  Each stamp features a portrait of the performer.  Several stamps include a second smaller image of the performer or other elements representative of their careers.  Click here for the complete set.

 

History the stamp represents:  Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921) was part of the first U.S. public radio broadcast in 1910 and became the first recording star in history. The fledgling record industry was scorned by many musicians, but Caruso embraced it. He recorded hundreds of pieces, earning significant royalties along the way.

 

Caruso was one of the Metropolitan Opera’s lead singers in the early 20th century. The commercial availability of his recordings helped promote his fame beyond the stage. Fans worldwide could listen to his performances. When he toured, promoters had little trouble selling his shows. This new music medium also brought opera to a whole new audience, helping to extend the “golden age” of opera into the 20th century.

 

Caruso used his celebrity status to help the war effort. He promoted Liberty Bonds and raised millions through charity concerts. He remains one of the best-known operatic tenors in history and is often the standard by which other tenors are measured.

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U.S. #2250
1987 22¢ Enrico Caruso
Performing Arts Series

  • 10th stamp in Performing Arts Series
  • Depicts Caruso in his favorite role, as the Duke of Manua in Rogoletto

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Series: 
Performing Arts
Value: 
22¢, first-class rate
First Day of Issue: 
February 27, 1987
First Day City: 
New York, New York
Quantity Issued: 
130,000,000
Printed by: 
American Bank Note Company
Printing Method: 
Photogravure
Format: 
Panes of 50 in sheets of 200
Perforations:  11

 

Why the stamp was issued:  To honor operatic tenor Enrico Caruso.

 

About the stamp design:  Jim Sharpe designed this stamp, as he had all previous stamps in the series.  He based Caruso’s portrait on several different photographs of the performer in his costume for the Duke of Manua in Rigoletto

 

Special design details:  The American Bank Note Company used two different paper suppliers for this stamp, resulting in slight color differences.  One of the papers has a yellowish hue while the other is more blue.

 

First Day City:  The First Day ceremony for this stamp was held at the Metropolitan Opera at Lincoln Center, in New York City, New York. 

 

Unusual fact about this stamp:  A very rare error exists with the black gravure printing omitted.  Only 10 such stamps have been reported to date.

 

About the Performing Arts Series:  The Performing Arts series ran from 1978 to 1987 and honored 12 performers of stage and screen including musicians and actors.  Each stamp features a portrait of the performer.  Several stamps include a second smaller image of the performer or other elements representative of their careers.  Click here for the complete set.

 

History the stamp represents:  Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921) was part of the first U.S. public radio broadcast in 1910 and became the first recording star in history. The fledgling record industry was scorned by many musicians, but Caruso embraced it. He recorded hundreds of pieces, earning significant royalties along the way.

 

Caruso was one of the Metropolitan Opera’s lead singers in the early 20th century. The commercial availability of his recordings helped promote his fame beyond the stage. Fans worldwide could listen to his performances. When he toured, promoters had little trouble selling his shows. This new music medium also brought opera to a whole new audience, helping to extend the “golden age” of opera into the 20th century.

 

Caruso used his celebrity status to help the war effort. He promoted Liberty Bonds and raised millions through charity concerts. He remains one of the best-known operatic tenors in history and is often the standard by which other tenors are measured.