1994-95 Old Glory, set of 15 stamps

# 2879-2893 - 1994-95 Old Glory, set of 15 stamps

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U.S. #2879-93
1994 G-rate Series, 15 Stamps

 

  • 15 stamps that were issued for the new first-class G-rate change
  • The G-rate was issued in more varieties, formats, and printers than any other rate change stamp.

Stamp Category:  Definitive
Set:  G-rate   
Value:  Varied
First Day of Issue:  December 13,1994
First Day City: Washington, D.C.   
Printed by:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP), Stamp Venturers, KCS Industries, Avery Dennison, and American Bank Note Company (ABNC)
Printing Method: 
Gravure and Offset
Format: 
Sheet, booklet, and coil.
Perforations:  Varied

Why the stamps were issued:  The USPS issued this G series general-use stamp for the new first-class rate that would take place in 1995.

About the stamp designs:  Old Glory was designed by Ronald Sharpe who was the first African-American Banknote Designer at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

Special design details: The “G” on each first-class rate stamp changes color depending on the printer. For instance, a red “G” means it was printed by Stamp Venturers, a blue “G” mean it was printed by American Banknote Corporation and a black “G” is Bureau of Engraving and Printing. The one exception is Avery Dennison who did black G’s as well, but since the stamps are the only self-adhesive, they are easy to tell apart from the BEP stamps.

About the G-rate Series:  The USPS issued G-rate stamps to aid in the transition of a new postal rate. All, except two, G-rate stamps picture the US Flag with “Old Glory” in text above it, the other two are blue doves not included in this set. They released eighteen different versions of G-rate stamps, including an official stamp.  These came in six different formats, in five varied rates, from five different printers! These include six different sheet stamps, six coils, four booklets, and two self-adhesives. This made the G-rate stamps printed by more printers and in more formats that any previous rate change stamp. 

History the stamp represents:  The US Postal Service started making rate change stamps, or “contingency” stamps as they were known, in 1978 with the A-rate which was fifteen cents. They wanted to make sure they had stamps to fulfill any rate change, gap in prices, or any combination.  In early 1981 the B-rate stamps were issued to make up eighteen cents. At the end of 1981 the C-rate for twenty cents was issued. A few years went by before the D-rate came along in 1985.  With the E-rate collectors saw a shift from an eagle with the color stamp to the image reflecting the letter, E having an Earth on the stamp in 1988. The F make-up-rate was only four cents and depicted a tulip on the stamp. G-rate was in 1995 and H followed in 1999. Collectors thought they were going to keep going following the rest of the alphabet, but H was where it ended. Many joked that the US Postal Service didn’t want to issue an I-rate stamp, but the reasons behind the end was never clear.

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U.S. #2879-93
1994 G-rate Series, 15 Stamps

 

  • 15 stamps that were issued for the new first-class G-rate change
  • The G-rate was issued in more varieties, formats, and printers than any other rate change stamp.

Stamp Category:  Definitive
Set:  G-rate   
Value:  Varied
First Day of Issue:  December 13,1994
First Day City: Washington, D.C.   
Printed by:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP), Stamp Venturers, KCS Industries, Avery Dennison, and American Bank Note Company (ABNC)
Printing Method: 
Gravure and Offset
Format: 
Sheet, booklet, and coil.
Perforations:  Varied

Why the stamps were issued:  The USPS issued this G series general-use stamp for the new first-class rate that would take place in 1995.

About the stamp designs:  Old Glory was designed by Ronald Sharpe who was the first African-American Banknote Designer at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

Special design details: The “G” on each first-class rate stamp changes color depending on the printer. For instance, a red “G” means it was printed by Stamp Venturers, a blue “G” mean it was printed by American Banknote Corporation and a black “G” is Bureau of Engraving and Printing. The one exception is Avery Dennison who did black G’s as well, but since the stamps are the only self-adhesive, they are easy to tell apart from the BEP stamps.

About the G-rate Series:  The USPS issued G-rate stamps to aid in the transition of a new postal rate. All, except two, G-rate stamps picture the US Flag with “Old Glory” in text above it, the other two are blue doves not included in this set. They released eighteen different versions of G-rate stamps, including an official stamp.  These came in six different formats, in five varied rates, from five different printers! These include six different sheet stamps, six coils, four booklets, and two self-adhesives. This made the G-rate stamps printed by more printers and in more formats that any previous rate change stamp. 

History the stamp represents:  The US Postal Service started making rate change stamps, or “contingency” stamps as they were known, in 1978 with the A-rate which was fifteen cents. They wanted to make sure they had stamps to fulfill any rate change, gap in prices, or any combination.  In early 1981 the B-rate stamps were issued to make up eighteen cents. At the end of 1981 the C-rate for twenty cents was issued. A few years went by before the D-rate came along in 1985.  With the E-rate collectors saw a shift from an eagle with the color stamp to the image reflecting the letter, E having an Earth on the stamp in 1988. The F make-up-rate was only four cents and depicted a tulip on the stamp. G-rate was in 1995 and H followed in 1999. Collectors thought they were going to keep going following the rest of the alphabet, but H was where it ended. Many joked that the US Postal Service didn’t want to issue an I-rate stamp, but the reasons behind the end was never clear.