1994 32c G-rate Old Glory, black "G", booklet single

# 2883 - 1994 32c G-rate Old Glory, black "G", booklet single

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U.S. #2883
1994 G-rate Old Glory

  • Issued as a non-denominated stamp
  • “Domestic” or “Domestic Use” was changed to “US Address Only” to clear up confusion for First Class Mail

Stamp Category: Definitive
Set: G Series
Value:  32¢ First Class Rate
First Day of Issue:  December 13, 1994
First Day City(s):  Washington, DC
Quantity Issued: 1,112,750,000
Printed by:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Gravure Printing (7-color Andreotti gravure webfed press) and processed on the Goebel booklet-forming machine.
Format:  Booklet stamp. 1 pane or 2 panes of 10 vertical stamps, arranged vertically, 2 across and 5 down. Gravure printing cylinders of 480 subjects (20 across, 24 around) processed into 10-stamp and 20-stamp booklets on Goebel booklet-forming machine.

Perforations:  10 x 9.8

Why the stamp was issued:  The USPS issued this G series general-use stamp for the new first-class rate that would take place in 1995.

About the stamp design:  This stamp was designed by Ronald Sharpe who was the first African-American Banknote Designer at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. The black “G” on the stamp indicates it was printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

Special design details:  The USPS had a few other design ideas that would match the G rate stamp such as a goose, grapes and even George Washington, but they settled on “Old Glory.”

About the printing process:  The stamp was printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing on their 7-color Andreotti gravure webfed press (601). This Italian-made press was acquired by the BEP in 1970 and was the workhorse making all the multicolored stamps around that time period. Sheets were then taken and processed into booklets on the Gebel booklet-forming machine.

First Day City:  Most definitive stamps that don’t receive a first day ceremony get issued in Washington, DC which is home of the United States Postal Headquarters.

About the G-rate Series: The USPS issued G-rate stamps to aid in the transition of a new postal rate. All, except two, G-rate stamps picture the US Flag with “Old Glory” in text above it, the other two are blue doves. They released eighteen different versions of G-rate stamps.  These came in six different formats, in five varied rates, from five different printers! These include six different sheet stamps, six coils, four booklets, and two self-adhesives. This made the G-rate stamps printed by more printers and in more formats that any previous rate change stamp.

History the stamp represents:  The US Postal Service started making rate change stamps, or “contingency” stamps as they were known, in 1978 with the A-rate which was fifteen cents. They wanted to make sure they had stamps to fulfill any rate change, gap in prices, or any combination.  In early 1981 the B-rate stamps were issued to make up eighteen cents. At the end of 1981 the C-rate for twenty cents was issued. A few years went by before the D-rate came along in 1985.  With the E-rate collectors saw a shift from an eagle with the color stamp to the image reflecting the letter, E having an Earth on the stamp in 1988. The F make-up-rate was only four cents and depicted a tulip on the stamp. G-rate was in 1995 and H followed in 1999. Collectors thought they were going to keep going following the rest of the alphabet, but H was where it ended. Many joked that the US Postal Service didn’t want to issue an I-rate stamp, but the reasons behind the end was never clear.

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U.S. #2883
1994 G-rate Old Glory

  • Issued as a non-denominated stamp
  • “Domestic” or “Domestic Use” was changed to “US Address Only” to clear up confusion for First Class Mail

Stamp Category: Definitive
Set: G Series
Value:  32¢ First Class Rate
First Day of Issue:  December 13, 1994
First Day City(s):  Washington, DC
Quantity Issued: 1,112,750,000
Printed by:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:  Gravure Printing (7-color Andreotti gravure webfed press) and processed on the Goebel booklet-forming machine.
Format:  Booklet stamp. 1 pane or 2 panes of 10 vertical stamps, arranged vertically, 2 across and 5 down. Gravure printing cylinders of 480 subjects (20 across, 24 around) processed into 10-stamp and 20-stamp booklets on Goebel booklet-forming machine.

Perforations:  10 x 9.8

Why the stamp was issued:  The USPS issued this G series general-use stamp for the new first-class rate that would take place in 1995.

About the stamp design:  This stamp was designed by Ronald Sharpe who was the first African-American Banknote Designer at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. The black “G” on the stamp indicates it was printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

Special design details:  The USPS had a few other design ideas that would match the G rate stamp such as a goose, grapes and even George Washington, but they settled on “Old Glory.”

About the printing process:  The stamp was printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing on their 7-color Andreotti gravure webfed press (601). This Italian-made press was acquired by the BEP in 1970 and was the workhorse making all the multicolored stamps around that time period. Sheets were then taken and processed into booklets on the Gebel booklet-forming machine.

First Day City:  Most definitive stamps that don’t receive a first day ceremony get issued in Washington, DC which is home of the United States Postal Headquarters.

About the G-rate Series: The USPS issued G-rate stamps to aid in the transition of a new postal rate. All, except two, G-rate stamps picture the US Flag with “Old Glory” in text above it, the other two are blue doves. They released eighteen different versions of G-rate stamps.  These came in six different formats, in five varied rates, from five different printers! These include six different sheet stamps, six coils, four booklets, and two self-adhesives. This made the G-rate stamps printed by more printers and in more formats that any previous rate change stamp.

History the stamp represents:  The US Postal Service started making rate change stamps, or “contingency” stamps as they were known, in 1978 with the A-rate which was fifteen cents. They wanted to make sure they had stamps to fulfill any rate change, gap in prices, or any combination.  In early 1981 the B-rate stamps were issued to make up eighteen cents. At the end of 1981 the C-rate for twenty cents was issued. A few years went by before the D-rate came along in 1985.  With the E-rate collectors saw a shift from an eagle with the color stamp to the image reflecting the letter, E having an Earth on the stamp in 1988. The F make-up-rate was only four cents and depicted a tulip on the stamp. G-rate was in 1995 and H followed in 1999. Collectors thought they were going to keep going following the rest of the alphabet, but H was where it ended. Many joked that the US Postal Service didn’t want to issue an I-rate stamp, but the reasons behind the end was never clear.