2006 10c American Clock

# 3762 - 2006 10c American Clock

$0.35 - $2.95
Image Condition Price Qty
652243
Colorano Silk First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 2.75
$ 2.75
0
328956
Classic First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days. Free with 500 Points
$ 2.50
$ 2.50
1
328959
Mint Stamp(s) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 0.50
$ 0.50
2
328960
Mint Coil Pair Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 1.05
$ 1.05
3
328961
Plate Number Coil of 3 Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 1.65
$ 1.65
4
328963
Used Single Stamp(s) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 0.35
$ 0.35
5
328962
Plate Number Coil of 5 Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 2.95
$ 2.95
6
Show More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Mount Price Qty

 

U.S. #3762
10¢ American Clock
American Design
 
Issue Date: August 4, 2006
City: Independence, OR
Printed By: American Packaging Corp. for Sennett Security Products
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
9 ¾ Vertically
Color: Green, yellow, and black
 
The self-adhesive American Clock stamp is the second issue of the American Design Series that began with the 2002 American Toleware coil stamp. It replaced the 10¢ Red Cloud stamps of 1987-94. The design is from a clock made about 1805 by Simon Willard of Massachusetts.
 
Using simple hand tools, the early American clockmakers created masterpieces that kept time with precision.  After crafting the mechanism, clockmakers frequently commissioned cabinetmakers to make cases to conceal the pendulum and weights.  The result was a functional yet beautiful piece of furniture.
 
Simon Willard (1753-1848) was a noteworthy American clockmaker.  He established a workshop in 1780, was given complete responsibility for the clocks at Harvard University, and contributed elegant timepieces for the U.S. Senate and Supreme Court.
 
Willard developed a compact wall timepiece known as the “banjo clock.”  Unlike other clocks, the design omits the striking mechanism and indicates time only by its hands and dial.  Although Willard was granted a patent for his invention in 1802, many others imitated his design. 
 
Banjo clocks feature a round opening with a painted dial.  A long-waisted wooden case and a rectangular box with a hinged door, each with decorative glass panels, surround the pendulum.  A cast iron eagle (finial) tops most banjo clocks.  Only 4,000 authentic Willard banjo clocks are known.
 

First National Daylight Savings Time In The U.S. 

On March 31, 1918, daylight savings time went into effect for the first time in the United States.

Long before modern societies adopted daylight savings time, ancient civilizations based their activities around the Sun. The Romans used water clocks with scales that changed for different times of the year.

As early as 1784 Benjamin Franklin promoted the idea of adjusting schedules to coincide with the Sun’s light. In his 1784 satirical essay, “An Economical Project for the Diminishing the Cost of Light,” Franklin jokingly suggested that the people of Paris could use less candles if they woke up earlier.

The first official proposal for something similar to daylight savings time came in 1895. New Zealand scientist George Vernon Hudson proposed that clocks shift two hours forward in October and two hours backward in March. While there was some support for this idea, it never materialized.

A decade later, British builder William Willett had his own idea. He suggested that clocks be moved ahead 20 minutes on the four Sundays in April, and then switch back the same way in September. Willett’s proposal eventually reached Parliament but was never made into law.

In America, President William Howard Taft encouraged the passage of a June 1909 bill for his home city of Cincinnati, Ohio, to become the first city in America to adopt daylight savings time. On May 1, 1910, clocks in the city were set ahead one hour and would then fall back one hour on October 1.

Then in 1916, as the world was embroiled in war, many nations recognized the need to save fuel for electricity. Germany and Austria were the first to adopt a daylight savings program when they moved their clocks ahead one hour at 11:00 p.m. on April 30, 1916. Several other nations quickly followed suit that year and the year after.

Pennsylvania industrialist Robert Garland was visiting the United Kingdom and learned of this concept, which was then known as “fast time.” He returned to America and proposed its adoption.   President Woodrow Wilson approved the idea and it was signed into law on March 19, 1918. America first entered daylight savings time later that month, on March 31, 1918. America observed daylight savings time for seven months that year and the next. But with the war over, it grew unpopular and was repealed. Many other nations also abandoned daylight savings time after the war, though Canada, the United Kingdom, and France continued to use it, as well as a few American cities.

As America entered another war in the 1940s, the idea of daylight savings time reemerged. President Franklin Roosevelt signed legislation instituting year-round daylight savings time, also called “War Time,” beginning in February 1942. This remained in effect until the war ended in 1945.

For 20 years there were no more laws concerning daylight savings, which created significant confusion, particularly for travellers and broadcasters. Then Congress passed the Uniform Time Act of 1966. This law stated that daylight savings time would begin on the last Sunday of April and end the last Sunday of October, though states could pass an ordinance to be exempt from it. In the decades since there have been changes to the law, so that now in America daylight savings time begins on the second Sunday in March and ends on the first Sunday in November.

Click here to read the first two American daylight savings time acts.

 

Read More - Click Here

 

U.S. #3762
10¢ American Clock
American Design
 
Issue Date: August 4, 2006
City: Independence, OR
Printed By: American Packaging Corp. for Sennett Security Products
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
9 ¾ Vertically
Color: Green, yellow, and black
 
The self-adhesive American Clock stamp is the second issue of the American Design Series that began with the 2002 American Toleware coil stamp. It replaced the 10¢ Red Cloud stamps of 1987-94. The design is from a clock made about 1805 by Simon Willard of Massachusetts.
 
Using simple hand tools, the early American clockmakers created masterpieces that kept time with precision.  After crafting the mechanism, clockmakers frequently commissioned cabinetmakers to make cases to conceal the pendulum and weights.  The result was a functional yet beautiful piece of furniture.
 
Simon Willard (1753-1848) was a noteworthy American clockmaker.  He established a workshop in 1780, was given complete responsibility for the clocks at Harvard University, and contributed elegant timepieces for the U.S. Senate and Supreme Court.
 
Willard developed a compact wall timepiece known as the “banjo clock.”  Unlike other clocks, the design omits the striking mechanism and indicates time only by its hands and dial.  Although Willard was granted a patent for his invention in 1802, many others imitated his design. 
 
Banjo clocks feature a round opening with a painted dial.  A long-waisted wooden case and a rectangular box with a hinged door, each with decorative glass panels, surround the pendulum.  A cast iron eagle (finial) tops most banjo clocks.  Only 4,000 authentic Willard banjo clocks are known.
 

First National Daylight Savings Time In The U.S. 

On March 31, 1918, daylight savings time went into effect for the first time in the United States.

Long before modern societies adopted daylight savings time, ancient civilizations based their activities around the Sun. The Romans used water clocks with scales that changed for different times of the year.

As early as 1784 Benjamin Franklin promoted the idea of adjusting schedules to coincide with the Sun’s light. In his 1784 satirical essay, “An Economical Project for the Diminishing the Cost of Light,” Franklin jokingly suggested that the people of Paris could use less candles if they woke up earlier.

The first official proposal for something similar to daylight savings time came in 1895. New Zealand scientist George Vernon Hudson proposed that clocks shift two hours forward in October and two hours backward in March. While there was some support for this idea, it never materialized.

A decade later, British builder William Willett had his own idea. He suggested that clocks be moved ahead 20 minutes on the four Sundays in April, and then switch back the same way in September. Willett’s proposal eventually reached Parliament but was never made into law.

In America, President William Howard Taft encouraged the passage of a June 1909 bill for his home city of Cincinnati, Ohio, to become the first city in America to adopt daylight savings time. On May 1, 1910, clocks in the city were set ahead one hour and would then fall back one hour on October 1.

Then in 1916, as the world was embroiled in war, many nations recognized the need to save fuel for electricity. Germany and Austria were the first to adopt a daylight savings program when they moved their clocks ahead one hour at 11:00 p.m. on April 30, 1916. Several other nations quickly followed suit that year and the year after.

Pennsylvania industrialist Robert Garland was visiting the United Kingdom and learned of this concept, which was then known as “fast time.” He returned to America and proposed its adoption.   President Woodrow Wilson approved the idea and it was signed into law on March 19, 1918. America first entered daylight savings time later that month, on March 31, 1918. America observed daylight savings time for seven months that year and the next. But with the war over, it grew unpopular and was repealed. Many other nations also abandoned daylight savings time after the war, though Canada, the United Kingdom, and France continued to use it, as well as a few American cities.

As America entered another war in the 1940s, the idea of daylight savings time reemerged. President Franklin Roosevelt signed legislation instituting year-round daylight savings time, also called “War Time,” beginning in February 1942. This remained in effect until the war ended in 1945.

For 20 years there were no more laws concerning daylight savings, which created significant confusion, particularly for travellers and broadcasters. Then Congress passed the Uniform Time Act of 1966. This law stated that daylight savings time would begin on the last Sunday of April and end the last Sunday of October, though states could pass an ordinance to be exempt from it. In the decades since there have been changes to the law, so that now in America daylight savings time begins on the second Sunday in March and ends on the first Sunday in November.

Click here to read the first two American daylight savings time acts.