#4859 – 2014 70c Great Spangled Fritillary Butterfly

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U.S. #4859
2014 70¢ Great Spangled Fritillary
Butterfly
 
This stamp fulfilled the one-ounce non-machinable first-class and two-ounce rates. It’s the fourth stamp in the Butterfly series.
 
Although the great spangled fritillary is generally non-migratory, traveling only about 125 miles over each summer, its habitat and range are vast. This butterfly prefers open prairies, meadows, and woody clearings near the temperate forests of North America. It can be found across much of the central and northern portions of the United States and throughout most of Canada. 
 
This fritillary begins its life on or near any of a variety of violets, a favorite food source. Laid singly and haphazardly in late summer as the female fritillary flitters by, the eggs hatch two to three weeks later. However, the larvae remain dormant near the host plant over the winter. In the spring, the tiny, velvety, black and orange caterpillars will feed on the host violet’s leaves at night, and rest during the day while hidden on the underside of leaves or on the ground.
 
Unlike the usual five molts of most butterflies, the great spangled fritillary molts a total of six times during its larval stage, growing more with each cycle. These unusually large caterpillars become equally large butterflies. Eventually possessing a wingspan up to four inches, the great spangled fritillary is the largest of all the fritillary butterflies.
 

Butterfly Series

On May 17, 2010, the USPS issued the first stamp in the Butterfly Series.

In late 2009, the USPS unveiled the first butterfly stamp for greeting card envelopes that required additional postage (an extra 20¢) than the standard one-ounce rate covered.  This would apply to envelopes that couldn’t be sorted on the USPS’s automated equipment, otherwise known as “nonmachinable.”

Some of these nonmachinable envelopes include those that are oddly-shaped or vertical, lumpy, rigid, or with clasps, ribbons, or buttons on them.  Even if an envelope weighed less than one ounce, but was unmachinable, it would need this stamp.  However, letters that were simply heavy didn’t necessarily need it.  The two-ounce rate at the time was 61¢, and this stamp was 64¢, so they would be overpaying by 3¢ if they used it.

The USPS worked closely with the greeting card industry on this new stamp.  Prior to this issue, some greeting card envelopes would be imprinted with “extra postage required.”  With the creation of this new stamp, the Greeting Card Association encouraged its members to print a butterfly silhouette on the envelopes of cards that would require this additional postage.  Reflecting this close working relationship, the 64¢ monarch butterfly stamp was issued on May 17, 2010, at the National Stationery Show held at the Jacob Javits Center in New York.

The monarch stamp remained in use for two years, being replaced by the Baltimore checkerspot butterfly stamp in 2012 when the nonmachinable rate increased to 65¢.  New stamps were issued each year through 2016.  The 2015 and 2016 followed the Forever format, in printing “non-machinable surcharge” on the stamp, rather than the actual denomination.

The California dogface butterfly stamp was initially announced in 2016 and expected for a 2017 release.  However, the USPS said that they had designed the stamp, but wouldn’t produce it until supplies of existing butterfly stamps were nearly depleted.  So that stamp wasn’t issued until 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click here to view lots more US and worldwide butterfly stamps.

 
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U.S. #4859
2014 70¢ Great Spangled Fritillary
Butterfly
 
This stamp fulfilled the one-ounce non-machinable first-class and two-ounce rates. It’s the fourth stamp in the Butterfly series.
 
Although the great spangled fritillary is generally non-migratory, traveling only about 125 miles over each summer, its habitat and range are vast. This butterfly prefers open prairies, meadows, and woody clearings near the temperate forests of North America. It can be found across much of the central and northern portions of the United States and throughout most of Canada. 
 
This fritillary begins its life on or near any of a variety of violets, a favorite food source. Laid singly and haphazardly in late summer as the female fritillary flitters by, the eggs hatch two to three weeks later. However, the larvae remain dormant near the host plant over the winter. In the spring, the tiny, velvety, black and orange caterpillars will feed on the host violet’s leaves at night, and rest during the day while hidden on the underside of leaves or on the ground.
 
Unlike the usual five molts of most butterflies, the great spangled fritillary molts a total of six times during its larval stage, growing more with each cycle. These unusually large caterpillars become equally large butterflies. Eventually possessing a wingspan up to four inches, the great spangled fritillary is the largest of all the fritillary butterflies.
 

Butterfly Series

On May 17, 2010, the USPS issued the first stamp in the Butterfly Series.

In late 2009, the USPS unveiled the first butterfly stamp for greeting card envelopes that required additional postage (an extra 20¢) than the standard one-ounce rate covered.  This would apply to envelopes that couldn’t be sorted on the USPS’s automated equipment, otherwise known as “nonmachinable.”

Some of these nonmachinable envelopes include those that are oddly-shaped or vertical, lumpy, rigid, or with clasps, ribbons, or buttons on them.  Even if an envelope weighed less than one ounce, but was unmachinable, it would need this stamp.  However, letters that were simply heavy didn’t necessarily need it.  The two-ounce rate at the time was 61¢, and this stamp was 64¢, so they would be overpaying by 3¢ if they used it.

The USPS worked closely with the greeting card industry on this new stamp.  Prior to this issue, some greeting card envelopes would be imprinted with “extra postage required.”  With the creation of this new stamp, the Greeting Card Association encouraged its members to print a butterfly silhouette on the envelopes of cards that would require this additional postage.  Reflecting this close working relationship, the 64¢ monarch butterfly stamp was issued on May 17, 2010, at the National Stationery Show held at the Jacob Javits Center in New York.

The monarch stamp remained in use for two years, being replaced by the Baltimore checkerspot butterfly stamp in 2012 when the nonmachinable rate increased to 65¢.  New stamps were issued each year through 2016.  The 2015 and 2016 followed the Forever format, in printing “non-machinable surcharge” on the stamp, rather than the actual denomination.

The California dogface butterfly stamp was initially announced in 2016 and expected for a 2017 release.  However, the USPS said that they had designed the stamp, but wouldn’t produce it until supplies of existing butterfly stamps were nearly depleted.  So that stamp wasn’t issued until 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click here to view lots more US and worldwide butterfly stamps.