#560 – 1923 8c Grant, olive green

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$67.50
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. iFREE with 330 points!
$1.35
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$42.50
- Used Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. iFREE with 150 points!
$0.70
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Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Plate Block of 6
Ships in 30 days. i
$755.00
camera Mint Stamp(s)
Fine
Ships in 1 business day. i
$85.00
camera Mint Stamp(s)
Fine, Never Hinged
Ships in 1 business day. i
$105.00
camera Mint Stamp(s)
Very Fine
Ships in 1 business day. i
$105.00
camera Mint Stamp(s)
Very Fine, Never Hinged
Ships in 1 business day. i
$132.50
Grading Guide

Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63625 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
- MM636 25 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
- MM50350 Vertical Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 27 x 30 millimeters (1 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.95
- MM4200Mystic Clear Mount 27x30mm - 50 precut mounts
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$1.95

U.S. #560
Series of 1922-25
8¢ Ulysses S. Grant


Issue Date:
May 1, 1923
First City:  Washington, D.C.
Issue Quantity: 367,196,477

Wheels of Progress

In 1847, when the printing presses first began to move, they didn’t roll – they “stamped” in a process known as flat plate printing.  The Regular Series of 1922 was the last to be printed by flat plate press, after which stamps were produced by rotary press printing.

 

By 1926, all denominations up to 10¢ – except the new ½¢ – were printed by rotary press.  For a while, $1 to $5 issues were done on flat plate press due to smaller demand.

 

The Presidency of Ulysses S. Grant
18th American President

Following the Union victory on April 9, 1865, Grant became a national hero.  He was so popular, in fact, he was elected President in 1868.  Unfortunately, Grant’s lack of prior political experience caused him to fall prey to unscrupulous politicians.  He appointed many of his friends to cabinet positions, and within months, his administration was fraught with scandal.  One such scandal involved Grant’s own brother-in-law providing insider information to the financier Jay Gould, who was attempting to corner the gold market.

Despite the scandals of his first administration, Ulysses Grant was elected to a second term as President.  This term proved more disastrous than the first.  Several high-ranking government officials were involved in illegal stock dealings in connection with the Union Pacific Railroad.  Two members of Grant’s own cabinet were forced to resign rather than face impeachment for their involvement in the Whiskey Ring, where the U.S. government was swindled out of millions of dollars in excise taxes.

Following his second term in office, Grant retired to New York.  After the bank he had invested in went bankrupt, Grant raised money by writing his memoirs.  He died on July 23, 1885, just a few weeks after completing his writing.

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U.S. #560
Series of 1922-25
8¢ Ulysses S. Grant


Issue Date:
May 1, 1923
First City:  Washington, D.C.
Issue Quantity: 367,196,477

Wheels of Progress

In 1847, when the printing presses first began to move, they didn’t roll – they “stamped” in a process known as flat plate printing.  The Regular Series of 1922 was the last to be printed by flat plate press, after which stamps were produced by rotary press printing.

 

By 1926, all denominations up to 10¢ – except the new ½¢ – were printed by rotary press.  For a while, $1 to $5 issues were done on flat plate press due to smaller demand.

 

The Presidency of Ulysses S. Grant
18th American President

Following the Union victory on April 9, 1865, Grant became a national hero.  He was so popular, in fact, he was elected President in 1868.  Unfortunately, Grant’s lack of prior political experience caused him to fall prey to unscrupulous politicians.  He appointed many of his friends to cabinet positions, and within months, his administration was fraught with scandal.  One such scandal involved Grant’s own brother-in-law providing insider information to the financier Jay Gould, who was attempting to corner the gold market.

Despite the scandals of his first administration, Ulysses Grant was elected to a second term as President.  This term proved more disastrous than the first.  Several high-ranking government officials were involved in illegal stock dealings in connection with the Union Pacific Railroad.  Two members of Grant’s own cabinet were forced to resign rather than face impeachment for their involvement in the Whiskey Ring, where the U.S. government was swindled out of millions of dollars in excise taxes.

Following his second term in office, Grant retired to New York.  After the bank he had invested in went bankrupt, Grant raised money by writing his memoirs.  He died on July 23, 1885, just a few weeks after completing his writing.