1995 32c Jazz Musicians: Charlie Parker

# 2987 - 1995 32c Jazz Musicians: Charlie Parker

$2.00 - $4.00
Image Condition Price Qty
319377
Fleetwood First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 3.20
$ 3.20
0
319378
Mystic First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 2.95
$ 2.95
1
319379
Colorano Silk First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 2.50
$ 2.50
2
319376
Classic First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 2.00
$ 2.00
3
No Image
Mint Stamp(s) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 4.00
$ 4.00
4
319381
Used Single Stamp(s) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 2.50
$ 2.50
5
Show More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Mount Price Qty

U.S. #2987
1995 Charlie Parker
Jazz Musicians

  • Issued in the Legends of American Music Series

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Set:  Legends of American Music Series
Value:  32c First-Class postage rate
First Day of Issue:  September 16, 1995
First Day Cities:  Monterey, California
Quantity Issued:  150,000,000
Printed by:  Sterling Sommer in Tonawanda, NY for Ashton-Potter
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Pane of 20

Perforations:  11.1 x 10.9

Why the stamps were issued:  They were issued as part of the new Legends of American Music Series to honor jazz and the instrumentalist and composers who made it popular.  Each stamp satisfied the First-Class postage rate.

About the stamp design:  The stamp was designed by Dean Mitchell who designed six of the #2983-2992 Jazz Musicians pane.  Art direction was by Howard Paine.  Dean Mitchell based his painting of Charlie Parker on a photograph taken by William Gottlieb, a well-known photographer of jazz musicians.  Gottlieb was disappointed with how the painting turned out.  Mitchell also, said this was his least favorite and had a hard time getting his head shaped right due to the dark shadow in the photo.

About The Set:  The Legends of American Music Series debuted on January 8, 1993 and ran until 1999.  More than 70 artists are represented from all styles of music:  rock and roll, rhythm and blues, country and western, jazz and pop, opera and classical, gospel and folk.  In addition to individual singers and Broadway musicals, subjects include bandleaders, classical composers, Hollywood songwriters and composers, plus conductors and lyricists. 

The Legends of American Music Set was a huge advancement for diversity because it honored many Black and female artists. 

The 29c “young Elvis” – #2721, kicked off the series in a big and very public way.  Its design was voted on by over one million Americans, about 75% of whom favored the young Elvis over the “old Elvis” version. 

History the stamp represents:         

          Charles Parker Jr. was born in Kansas City, Kansas in 1920. His mother bought him an alto saxophone when he was 11, and he played baritone horn in the school band. When he was only 15 years old, Parker quit school and became a full-time musician. He soon became involved in what would be a great source of tragedy throughout his life: narcotics addiction.
         
Parker developed his inimitable style while wandering in and out of various bands, including those of Jay McShann, Earl Hines, and Billy Eckstine. His incredible playing earned him many nicknames, including Charlie, Yardbird, and Bird. In 1941, while playing with McShann in New York City, he met trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie. These two men were among the most prominent of a group of musicians credited with creating the “bebop” or “bop” style.
          A contemporary of Parker once said, “If Charlie wanted to invoke plagiarism laws, he could sue almost anyone who’s made a record in the last ten years.” A true musical genius, Parker’s mastery of the saxophone, improvisational skill, and compositions elevated the status quo for all aspects of jazz music. His best-known works include “Now’s The Time,” “Yardbird Suite,” “Confirmation,” and “Relaxin’ At Camarillo.”

Read More - Click Here

U.S. #2987
1995 Charlie Parker
Jazz Musicians

  • Issued in the Legends of American Music Series

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Set:  Legends of American Music Series
Value:  32c First-Class postage rate
First Day of Issue:  September 16, 1995
First Day Cities:  Monterey, California
Quantity Issued:  150,000,000
Printed by:  Sterling Sommer in Tonawanda, NY for Ashton-Potter
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Pane of 20

Perforations:  11.1 x 10.9

Why the stamps were issued:  They were issued as part of the new Legends of American Music Series to honor jazz and the instrumentalist and composers who made it popular.  Each stamp satisfied the First-Class postage rate.

About the stamp design:  The stamp was designed by Dean Mitchell who designed six of the #2983-2992 Jazz Musicians pane.  Art direction was by Howard Paine.  Dean Mitchell based his painting of Charlie Parker on a photograph taken by William Gottlieb, a well-known photographer of jazz musicians.  Gottlieb was disappointed with how the painting turned out.  Mitchell also, said this was his least favorite and had a hard time getting his head shaped right due to the dark shadow in the photo.

About The Set:  The Legends of American Music Series debuted on January 8, 1993 and ran until 1999.  More than 70 artists are represented from all styles of music:  rock and roll, rhythm and blues, country and western, jazz and pop, opera and classical, gospel and folk.  In addition to individual singers and Broadway musicals, subjects include bandleaders, classical composers, Hollywood songwriters and composers, plus conductors and lyricists. 

The Legends of American Music Set was a huge advancement for diversity because it honored many Black and female artists. 

The 29c “young Elvis” – #2721, kicked off the series in a big and very public way.  Its design was voted on by over one million Americans, about 75% of whom favored the young Elvis over the “old Elvis” version. 

History the stamp represents:         

          Charles Parker Jr. was born in Kansas City, Kansas in 1920. His mother bought him an alto saxophone when he was 11, and he played baritone horn in the school band. When he was only 15 years old, Parker quit school and became a full-time musician. He soon became involved in what would be a great source of tragedy throughout his life: narcotics addiction.
         
Parker developed his inimitable style while wandering in and out of various bands, including those of Jay McShann, Earl Hines, and Billy Eckstine. His incredible playing earned him many nicknames, including Charlie, Yardbird, and Bird. In 1941, while playing with McShann in New York City, he met trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie. These two men were among the most prominent of a group of musicians credited with creating the “bebop” or “bop” style.
          A contemporary of Parker once said, “If Charlie wanted to invoke plagiarism laws, he could sue almost anyone who’s made a record in the last ten years.” A true musical genius, Parker’s mastery of the saxophone, improvisational skill, and compositions elevated the status quo for all aspects of jazz music. His best-known works include “Now’s The Time,” “Yardbird Suite,” “Confirmation,” and “Relaxin’ At Camarillo.”