1995 32c Jazz Musicians: Louis Armstrong

# 2984 - 1995 32c Jazz Musicians: Louis Armstrong

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U.S. #2984
1995 Louis Armstrong
Jazz Musicians

  • Issued in the Legends of American Music Series
  • Louis Armstrong appeared twice, once in the full pane of 20 singles; and once again in the se-tenant issued 15 days later. He was third to get this kind of double issue treatment.

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Set:  Legends of American Music Series
Value:  32c First-Class postage rate
First Day of Issue:  September 16, 1995
First Day Cities:  Monterey, California
Quantity Issued:  150,000,000
Printed by:  Sterling Sommer in Tonawanda, NY for Ashton-Potter
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Pane of 20
Perforations:  11.1 x 10.9

Why the stamps were issued:  They were issued as part of the new Legends of American Music Series to honor jazz and the instrumentalist and composers who made it popular.  Each stamp satisfied the First-Class postage rate.

About the stamp design:  The stamp was designed by Dean Mitchell who designed six of the #2983-2992 Jazz Musicians pane.  Art direction was by Howard Paine. 

Special design details:  At first glance, the design of the Armstrong single stamp (#2982) is the same as the second in the set (#2984).  In fact, it had several design changes.  The colors of the text are inverted, so while black on the first stay would be white on the second stamp. If white on the first stamp it was changed to black on the second stamp. A subtle change also occurred with the date. On the full pane of Louis Armstrong, the date is right below the vertical description, but on the se-tenant single the date is shifted to the right a bit. The last way to tell them apart is the microprinting on the single variety. It is located on his sleeve and says “ARMSTRONG.” USPS officials thought microprinting for se-tenant varieties was a wasted security feature, to it was dropped for the se-tenant sheet. 

About The Set:  The Legends of American Music Series debuted on January 8, 1993 and ran until 1999.  More than 70 artists are represented from all styles of music:  rock and roll, rhythm and blues, country and western, jazz and pop, opera and classical, gospel and folk.  In addition to individual singers and Broadway musicals, subjects include bandleaders, classical composers, Hollywood songwriters and composers, plus conductors and lyricists. 

The Legends of American Music Set was a huge advancement for diversity because it honored many Black and female artists. 

The 29c “young Elvis” – #2721, kicked off the series in a big and very public way.  Its design was voted on by over one million Americans, about 75% of whom favored the young Elvis over the “old Elvis” version. 

 History the stamp represents: 

          When asked to define jazz, Louis Armstrong replied, “Baby, if you got to ask the question, you’re never going to know the answer.”  And just as Armstrong implied it was impossible to define jazz, the same can be said about Armstrong’s inimitable talent.  Many historians credit Armstrong for singlehandedly popularizing jazz throughout the world.
          The trumpet was Armstrong’s instrument, and he is still regarded as one of the most brilliant soloists in jazz.  But Armstrong also used his gruff, throaty voice, charm, and humor to thrill audiences.  He popularized scat, a singing style which utilizes common sounds, but not words, in rhythmic patterns.
           Prior to Armstrong, jazz music had been based on three instruments leading the band together.  Usually these were the trumpet, clarinet, and trombone.  But Armstrong’s talent could not be contained – and thus the era of the virtuoso jazz soloist was born.
            Armstrong worked with the biggest names in music and Hollywood during his career.  Among his many successes were the hit records “Hello, Dolly!” and “Mack the Knife,” and the motion pictures “New Orleans,” “High Society,” and “Hello, Dolly!”

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U.S. #2984
1995 Louis Armstrong
Jazz Musicians

  • Issued in the Legends of American Music Series
  • Louis Armstrong appeared twice, once in the full pane of 20 singles; and once again in the se-tenant issued 15 days later. He was third to get this kind of double issue treatment.

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Set:  Legends of American Music Series
Value:  32c First-Class postage rate
First Day of Issue:  September 16, 1995
First Day Cities:  Monterey, California
Quantity Issued:  150,000,000
Printed by:  Sterling Sommer in Tonawanda, NY for Ashton-Potter
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Pane of 20
Perforations:  11.1 x 10.9

Why the stamps were issued:  They were issued as part of the new Legends of American Music Series to honor jazz and the instrumentalist and composers who made it popular.  Each stamp satisfied the First-Class postage rate.

About the stamp design:  The stamp was designed by Dean Mitchell who designed six of the #2983-2992 Jazz Musicians pane.  Art direction was by Howard Paine. 

Special design details:  At first glance, the design of the Armstrong single stamp (#2982) is the same as the second in the set (#2984).  In fact, it had several design changes.  The colors of the text are inverted, so while black on the first stay would be white on the second stamp. If white on the first stamp it was changed to black on the second stamp. A subtle change also occurred with the date. On the full pane of Louis Armstrong, the date is right below the vertical description, but on the se-tenant single the date is shifted to the right a bit. The last way to tell them apart is the microprinting on the single variety. It is located on his sleeve and says “ARMSTRONG.” USPS officials thought microprinting for se-tenant varieties was a wasted security feature, to it was dropped for the se-tenant sheet. 

About The Set:  The Legends of American Music Series debuted on January 8, 1993 and ran until 1999.  More than 70 artists are represented from all styles of music:  rock and roll, rhythm and blues, country and western, jazz and pop, opera and classical, gospel and folk.  In addition to individual singers and Broadway musicals, subjects include bandleaders, classical composers, Hollywood songwriters and composers, plus conductors and lyricists. 

The Legends of American Music Set was a huge advancement for diversity because it honored many Black and female artists. 

The 29c “young Elvis” – #2721, kicked off the series in a big and very public way.  Its design was voted on by over one million Americans, about 75% of whom favored the young Elvis over the “old Elvis” version. 

 History the stamp represents: 

          When asked to define jazz, Louis Armstrong replied, “Baby, if you got to ask the question, you’re never going to know the answer.”  And just as Armstrong implied it was impossible to define jazz, the same can be said about Armstrong’s inimitable talent.  Many historians credit Armstrong for singlehandedly popularizing jazz throughout the world.
          The trumpet was Armstrong’s instrument, and he is still regarded as one of the most brilliant soloists in jazz.  But Armstrong also used his gruff, throaty voice, charm, and humor to thrill audiences.  He popularized scat, a singing style which utilizes common sounds, but not words, in rhythmic patterns.
           Prior to Armstrong, jazz music had been based on three instruments leading the band together.  Usually these were the trumpet, clarinet, and trombone.  But Armstrong’s talent could not be contained – and thus the era of the virtuoso jazz soloist was born.
            Armstrong worked with the biggest names in music and Hollywood during his career.  Among his many successes were the hit records “Hello, Dolly!” and “Mack the Knife,” and the motion pictures “New Orleans,” “High Society,” and “Hello, Dolly!”