1995 32c Jazz Musicians: Coleman Hawkins

# 2983 FDC - 1995 32c Jazz Musicians: Coleman Hawkins

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U.S. #2983
1995 Coleman Hawkins
Jazz Musicians

  • Issued in the Legends of American Music Series

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Set:  Legends of American Music Series
Value:  32c First-Class postage rate
First Day of Issue:  September 16, 1995
First Day Cities:  Monterey, California
Quantity Issued:  150,000,000
Printed by:  Sterling Sommer in Tonawanda, NY for Ashton-Potter
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Pane of 20
Perforations:  11.1 x 10.9

Why the stamps were issued:  They were issued as part of the new Legends of American Music Series to honor jazz and the instrumentalist and composers who made it popular.  Each stamp satisfied the First-Class postage rate.

About the stamp design:  The stamp was designed by Dean Mitchell who designed six of the #2983-2992 Jazz Musicians pane.  Art direction was by Howard Paine. 

About The Set:  The Legends of American Music Series debuted on January 8, 1993 and ran until 1999.  More than 70 artists are represented from all styles of music:  rock and roll, rhythm and blues, country and western, jazz and pop, opera and classical, gospel and folk.  In addition to individual singers and Broadway musicals, subjects include bandleaders, classical composers, Hollywood songwriters and composers, plus conductors and lyricists. 

The Legends of American Music Set was a huge advancement for diversity because it honored many Black and female artists. 

The 29c “young Elvis” – #2721, kicked off the series in a big and very public way.  Its design was voted on by over one million Americans, about 75% of whom favored the young Elvis over the “old Elvis” version. 

History the stamp represents: 

          Coleman Hawkins was born in 1904 in St. Joseph, Missouri.  He started his musical training early, studying the piano at age four, the cello at seven, and the saxophone at nine.  Hawkins’ professional career started when he toured with Mamie Smith’s Jazz Hounds, playing in New York City while still in his teens.
          From 1923 to 1934 Hawkins was a member of Fletcher Henderson’s legendary big band; some of his best work was recorded during those years.  He toured Europe from 1934 to ’39, often as a special guest with popular groups.  On October 11, 1939 he recorded the song “Body and Soul” with an improvised solo.  The song was a big hit and remains his definitive performance.
          Due to his musical gifts, Hawkins was ablet o take the tenor saxophone out of the reed section, and make it an important solo instrument.  His improvisational mastery of the instrument made him one of the most imitated musicians of the 1930’s and ‘40s.  Hawkins was among the first jazz horn players to fully understand intricate chord progressions, which allowed him to create more complex and dynamic solos.  Continuing to perform as a soloist and bandleader until his death in May 1969, he played with intensity and passion throughout his career.

 

 

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U.S. #2983
1995 Coleman Hawkins
Jazz Musicians

  • Issued in the Legends of American Music Series

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Set:  Legends of American Music Series
Value:  32c First-Class postage rate
First Day of Issue:  September 16, 1995
First Day Cities:  Monterey, California
Quantity Issued:  150,000,000
Printed by:  Sterling Sommer in Tonawanda, NY for Ashton-Potter
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Pane of 20
Perforations:  11.1 x 10.9

Why the stamps were issued:  They were issued as part of the new Legends of American Music Series to honor jazz and the instrumentalist and composers who made it popular.  Each stamp satisfied the First-Class postage rate.

About the stamp design:  The stamp was designed by Dean Mitchell who designed six of the #2983-2992 Jazz Musicians pane.  Art direction was by Howard Paine. 

About The Set:  The Legends of American Music Series debuted on January 8, 1993 and ran until 1999.  More than 70 artists are represented from all styles of music:  rock and roll, rhythm and blues, country and western, jazz and pop, opera and classical, gospel and folk.  In addition to individual singers and Broadway musicals, subjects include bandleaders, classical composers, Hollywood songwriters and composers, plus conductors and lyricists. 

The Legends of American Music Set was a huge advancement for diversity because it honored many Black and female artists. 

The 29c “young Elvis” – #2721, kicked off the series in a big and very public way.  Its design was voted on by over one million Americans, about 75% of whom favored the young Elvis over the “old Elvis” version. 

History the stamp represents: 

          Coleman Hawkins was born in 1904 in St. Joseph, Missouri.  He started his musical training early, studying the piano at age four, the cello at seven, and the saxophone at nine.  Hawkins’ professional career started when he toured with Mamie Smith’s Jazz Hounds, playing in New York City while still in his teens.
          From 1923 to 1934 Hawkins was a member of Fletcher Henderson’s legendary big band; some of his best work was recorded during those years.  He toured Europe from 1934 to ’39, often as a special guest with popular groups.  On October 11, 1939 he recorded the song “Body and Soul” with an improvised solo.  The song was a big hit and remains his definitive performance.
          Due to his musical gifts, Hawkins was ablet o take the tenor saxophone out of the reed section, and make it an important solo instrument.  His improvisational mastery of the instrument made him one of the most imitated musicians of the 1930’s and ‘40s.  Hawkins was among the first jazz horn players to fully understand intricate chord progressions, which allowed him to create more complex and dynamic solos.  Continuing to perform as a soloist and bandleader until his death in May 1969, he played with intensity and passion throughout his career.