1984 20c Love Series: Love with Hearts

# 2072 - 1984 20c Love Series: Love with Hearts

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U.S. #2072
1984 20¢ Love with Hearts
Love Series

 

  • America’s third Love stamp
  • Designed by long-time stamp designer Bradbury Thompson

 

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Series: 
Love
Value: 
20¢, rate for first-class mail
First Day of Issue: 
January 31, 1984
First Day City: 
Washington, D.C.
Quantity Issued: 
529,300,000
Printed by: 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: 
Photogravure and Engraved
Format: 
Panes of 50 in Sheets of 230
Perforations: 
11 x 10.5

 

Why the stamp was issued:  For use on Valentine’s mail as well as weddings, birthdays, anniversaries, and other special letters to loved ones.

 

About the stamp design:  Designed by graphic artist Bradbury Thompson, the 1984 Love stamp repeats the word “Love” five times, with the “V” in each one replaced by a different colored hear.  The hearts were printed by gravure while the type was printed by intaglio.

 

First Day City:  This stamp was issued at the Children’s Museum in Washington, DC in collaboration with the Greeting Card Association.  The design had originally been unveiled on November 1, 1983 to mark the start of National Card and Letter-Writing Week.  Additionally, a large three-dimensional version of the stamp was lowered at a New Year’s Eve celebration in Washington, DC.  

 

About the Love Series:  Based on the popularity of Christmas stamps, the USPS issued its first Love stamp in 1973.  It wasn’t intended to be the start of a series, and in fact, it wasn’t until 1982 that another Love stamp was issued.  Love-themed stamps were issued sporadically over the next few years.  The USPS stated that they weren’t intended just for Valentine’s Day mail, but also for weddings, birthdays, anniversaries, and other special occasions.  In 1987, the USPS officially declared it a series, and new Love stamps have been issued virtually every year since.  Love stamps are classified as “special” stamps. They are on sale longer than commemoratives, are usually printed in greater quantities, and may go back to press to meet demand. 

 

History the stamp represents:  The stylized heart shape is the universal symbol for passion and love.  There are many theories that seek to explain how the heart shape came to represent love.  One cites the use of the now-extinct silphium plant and the Greek city-state Cyrene in the seventh century B.C. 

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U.S. #2072
1984 20¢ Love with Hearts
Love Series

 

  • America’s third Love stamp
  • Designed by long-time stamp designer Bradbury Thompson

 

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Series: 
Love
Value: 
20¢, rate for first-class mail
First Day of Issue: 
January 31, 1984
First Day City: 
Washington, D.C.
Quantity Issued: 
529,300,000
Printed by: 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: 
Photogravure and Engraved
Format: 
Panes of 50 in Sheets of 230
Perforations: 
11 x 10.5

 

Why the stamp was issued:  For use on Valentine’s mail as well as weddings, birthdays, anniversaries, and other special letters to loved ones.

 

About the stamp design:  Designed by graphic artist Bradbury Thompson, the 1984 Love stamp repeats the word “Love” five times, with the “V” in each one replaced by a different colored hear.  The hearts were printed by gravure while the type was printed by intaglio.

 

First Day City:  This stamp was issued at the Children’s Museum in Washington, DC in collaboration with the Greeting Card Association.  The design had originally been unveiled on November 1, 1983 to mark the start of National Card and Letter-Writing Week.  Additionally, a large three-dimensional version of the stamp was lowered at a New Year’s Eve celebration in Washington, DC.  

 

About the Love Series:  Based on the popularity of Christmas stamps, the USPS issued its first Love stamp in 1973.  It wasn’t intended to be the start of a series, and in fact, it wasn’t until 1982 that another Love stamp was issued.  Love-themed stamps were issued sporadically over the next few years.  The USPS stated that they weren’t intended just for Valentine’s Day mail, but also for weddings, birthdays, anniversaries, and other special occasions.  In 1987, the USPS officially declared it a series, and new Love stamps have been issued virtually every year since.  Love stamps are classified as “special” stamps. They are on sale longer than commemoratives, are usually printed in greater quantities, and may go back to press to meet demand. 

 

History the stamp represents:  The stylized heart shape is the universal symbol for passion and love.  There are many theories that seek to explain how the heart shape came to represent love.  One cites the use of the now-extinct silphium plant and the Greek city-state Cyrene in the seventh century B.C.