1987 22c Girl Scouts

# 2251 - 1987 22c Girl Scouts

$0.35 - $51.50
(No reviews yet) Write a Review
Image Condition Price Qty
311752
Fleetwood First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 2.95
$ 2.95
0
311753
Fleetwood First Day Cover (Plate Block) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 3.75
$ 3.75
1
311751
Classic First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days. Free with 500 Points
$ 2.50
$ 2.50
2
311756
Mint Plate Block Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 5.50
$ 5.50
3
311755
Mint Stamp(s) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days. Free with 360 Points
$ 1.10
$ 1.10
4
311757
Mint Sheet(s) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 51.50
$ 51.50
5
311758
Used Single Stamp(s) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 0.35
$ 0.35
6
Show More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Mount Price Qty

U.S. #2251
1987 22¢ Girl Scouts

  • Issued for the 75th anniversary of the Girl Scouts of America
  • Third stamp to honor the organization
  • Stamp pictures 14 different Girl Scout merit badges 

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Value: 
22¢, first-class rate
First Day of Issue: 
March 12, 1987
First Day City: 
Washington, DC
Quantity Issued: 
149,980,000
Printed by: 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: 
Lithographed and Engraved
Format: 
Panes of 50 in sheets of 200
Perforations:  11

Why the stamp was issued:  To commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Girl Scouts of America. Other stamps honoring the organization and its founder include US #974, #1199, and #4691.

 

The stamp technically broke two of the USPS’s rules.  The USPS had previously stated that stamps should only honor anniversaries in multiples of 50 years.  They also imposed a rule that forbid the issue of stamps honoring organizations.  However, the USPS said that this stamp had been a “long-standing commitment.”

 

About the stamp design:  Richard D. Sheaff created this stamp with photos of several Girl Scout merit badges intended to provide visual variety and show to the extensive range of activities.  The 14 badges pictured are for wildlife, computers, health and safety, sports, cycling, active citizenship, people of the US, boating, art, local lore, aerospace, wider opportunities, science, and communications arts.  The badges are pictured on a green background, similar to the sashes worn by girl scouts.

 

About the printing process:  While most stamps printed on the D Press use intaglio printing for the lettering and denomination, this stamp used it for portions of the badges.  Black intaglio printed parts of the Conestoga wagon, Capitol dome, and globe, while red intaglio was used on the running shoes and sock.

 

First Day City:  The First Day ceremony for this stamp was held at the Departmental Auditorium in Washington, DC, which is available for use by government agencies.

 

Unusual fact about this stamp:  A bit of controversy arose before the stamp was issued.  The Girl Scouts of America sent letters to cachet-makers informing them that they had signed an exclusive agreement with Artcraft Covers, and that any other cover makers using the Girl Scouts logos or emblems would be met with legal action.  After significant uproar, the USPS threatened to cancel the stamp if the organization didn’t withdraw its ban.  The Girl Scouts then issued a revised statement that cachet-makers could produce generic cachets or secure permission from the Girl Scouts to use their logos.

 

History the stamp represents:  On March 12, 1912, Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low held the first meeting of the Girl Guides, the forerunner of the Girl Scouts of the United States of America.

 

Scouting groups were first started in England in 1907, when Lord Robert Baden-Powell began the Boy Scouts movement. When girls became interested in belonging to a similar group, he helped his sister Agnes Baden-Powell organize the Girl Guides program. Scouting quickly spread to other countries.

 

A British Boy Scout helped American businessman William D. Boyce find his way in London’s fog. When the boy refused his tip, telling him he was merely doing his “good turn” for the day, it left an impression on him. So Boyce then worked with others to found the Boy Scouts of America in 1910. The Handbook for Boys was published that same year. Some of the Scouts’ early contributions to their communities and their country were made to support Americans during World War I.

 

Juliette Gordon Low was a member of a prominent family in Georgia. Following the death of her husband, Low traveled to Europe in 1911 and met Sir Robert Baden-Powell and his sister Agnes. Low had long dreamed of an organization that would get girls out of their houses to experience the outdoors, while learning important skills to make them self-reliant and resourceful.

 

That August, Low began working with Agnes and the Girl Guides, and eventually formed a Girl Guides patrol near her home in Scotland. She taught the girls how to spin wool, care for livestock, tie knots, and read maps. She also taught them knitting, cooking, and first aid. Additionally, she had her military friends teach them about drilling, signaling, and camping.

 

In early 1912, Low brought Baden-Powell back to America to expand the scouting movement. When she returned home to Savannah, Georgia, Low called her cousin with exciting news. “I’ve got something for the girls of Savannah, and all of America, and all the world, and we’re going to start it tonight!”

That something was the “Girl Guides.” And she held the first-ever meeting of the Girl Guides of America on March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Georgia. (The name was changed to the Girl Scouts the following year.)

 

The first registered member of the American Girl Guides was Margaret Gordon, Juliette’s niece. Low’s first Girl Scout meeting included 18 girls, but by the next meeting there were 108 girls enrolled. By 1915 the organization had grown to include 5,000 girls. Because of the quickly growing numbers of girls, the organization was divided into three groups according to age. Today, there are even more groups. These levels are “Daisies” for the youngest girls (5-7 years old), “Brownies” (7-9), “Juniors” (9-11), “Cadettes” (11-14), “Seniors” (14-16), and finally “Ambassadors” (16-18).

 

Low was so committed to Girl Scouts, she sold her pearls to help support it. Later, 25¢ national dues were adopted to help support the organization.

 

During World War II, Boy and Girl Scouts were actively involved in selling U.S. Defense Bonds, growing Victory gardens, and collecting waste fats (to make ammunition) and scrap metals. In addition, they learned a wide variety of skills while earning badges.

 

Over the next 100 years, the Girl Scouts of the United States of America instilled values such as honesty, courage, community service, and citizenship to over 50 million young women. In 1994, the group was named the eighth most popular charity or non-profit in America, with 41% of Americans polled saying they “loved” the Girl Scouts or “liked them a lot.”

Read More - Click Here

U.S. #2251
1987 22¢ Girl Scouts

  • Issued for the 75th anniversary of the Girl Scouts of America
  • Third stamp to honor the organization
  • Stamp pictures 14 different Girl Scout merit badges 

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Value: 
22¢, first-class rate
First Day of Issue: 
March 12, 1987
First Day City: 
Washington, DC
Quantity Issued: 
149,980,000
Printed by: 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: 
Lithographed and Engraved
Format: 
Panes of 50 in sheets of 200
Perforations:  11

Why the stamp was issued:  To commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Girl Scouts of America. Other stamps honoring the organization and its founder include US #974, #1199, and #4691.

 

The stamp technically broke two of the USPS’s rules.  The USPS had previously stated that stamps should only honor anniversaries in multiples of 50 years.  They also imposed a rule that forbid the issue of stamps honoring organizations.  However, the USPS said that this stamp had been a “long-standing commitment.”

 

About the stamp design:  Richard D. Sheaff created this stamp with photos of several Girl Scout merit badges intended to provide visual variety and show to the extensive range of activities.  The 14 badges pictured are for wildlife, computers, health and safety, sports, cycling, active citizenship, people of the US, boating, art, local lore, aerospace, wider opportunities, science, and communications arts.  The badges are pictured on a green background, similar to the sashes worn by girl scouts.

 

About the printing process:  While most stamps printed on the D Press use intaglio printing for the lettering and denomination, this stamp used it for portions of the badges.  Black intaglio printed parts of the Conestoga wagon, Capitol dome, and globe, while red intaglio was used on the running shoes and sock.

 

First Day City:  The First Day ceremony for this stamp was held at the Departmental Auditorium in Washington, DC, which is available for use by government agencies.

 

Unusual fact about this stamp:  A bit of controversy arose before the stamp was issued.  The Girl Scouts of America sent letters to cachet-makers informing them that they had signed an exclusive agreement with Artcraft Covers, and that any other cover makers using the Girl Scouts logos or emblems would be met with legal action.  After significant uproar, the USPS threatened to cancel the stamp if the organization didn’t withdraw its ban.  The Girl Scouts then issued a revised statement that cachet-makers could produce generic cachets or secure permission from the Girl Scouts to use their logos.

 

History the stamp represents:  On March 12, 1912, Juliette “Daisy” Gordon Low held the first meeting of the Girl Guides, the forerunner of the Girl Scouts of the United States of America.

 

Scouting groups were first started in England in 1907, when Lord Robert Baden-Powell began the Boy Scouts movement. When girls became interested in belonging to a similar group, he helped his sister Agnes Baden-Powell organize the Girl Guides program. Scouting quickly spread to other countries.

 

A British Boy Scout helped American businessman William D. Boyce find his way in London’s fog. When the boy refused his tip, telling him he was merely doing his “good turn” for the day, it left an impression on him. So Boyce then worked with others to found the Boy Scouts of America in 1910. The Handbook for Boys was published that same year. Some of the Scouts’ early contributions to their communities and their country were made to support Americans during World War I.

 

Juliette Gordon Low was a member of a prominent family in Georgia. Following the death of her husband, Low traveled to Europe in 1911 and met Sir Robert Baden-Powell and his sister Agnes. Low had long dreamed of an organization that would get girls out of their houses to experience the outdoors, while learning important skills to make them self-reliant and resourceful.

 

That August, Low began working with Agnes and the Girl Guides, and eventually formed a Girl Guides patrol near her home in Scotland. She taught the girls how to spin wool, care for livestock, tie knots, and read maps. She also taught them knitting, cooking, and first aid. Additionally, she had her military friends teach them about drilling, signaling, and camping.

 

In early 1912, Low brought Baden-Powell back to America to expand the scouting movement. When she returned home to Savannah, Georgia, Low called her cousin with exciting news. “I’ve got something for the girls of Savannah, and all of America, and all the world, and we’re going to start it tonight!”

That something was the “Girl Guides.” And she held the first-ever meeting of the Girl Guides of America on March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Georgia. (The name was changed to the Girl Scouts the following year.)

 

The first registered member of the American Girl Guides was Margaret Gordon, Juliette’s niece. Low’s first Girl Scout meeting included 18 girls, but by the next meeting there were 108 girls enrolled. By 1915 the organization had grown to include 5,000 girls. Because of the quickly growing numbers of girls, the organization was divided into three groups according to age. Today, there are even more groups. These levels are “Daisies” for the youngest girls (5-7 years old), “Brownies” (7-9), “Juniors” (9-11), “Cadettes” (11-14), “Seniors” (14-16), and finally “Ambassadors” (16-18).

 

Low was so committed to Girl Scouts, she sold her pearls to help support it. Later, 25¢ national dues were adopted to help support the organization.

 

During World War II, Boy and Girl Scouts were actively involved in selling U.S. Defense Bonds, growing Victory gardens, and collecting waste fats (to make ammunition) and scrap metals. In addition, they learned a wide variety of skills while earning badges.

 

Over the next 100 years, the Girl Scouts of the United States of America instilled values such as honesty, courage, community service, and citizenship to over 50 million young women. In 1994, the group was named the eighth most popular charity or non-profit in America, with 41% of Americans polled saying they “loved” the Girl Scouts or “liked them a lot.”