1995 32c Recreational Sports: Bowling

# 2963 - 1995 32c Recreational Sports: Bowling

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U.S. #2963
1995 32¢ Bowling
Recreational Sports

 

  • Recreational Sports stamps honor popular sports enjoyed by everyday Americans
  • 1995 was the 100th anniversary of the American Bowling Congress

 

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Set: 
Recreational Sports
Value: 
32¢, rate for first-class mail
First Day of Issue: 
May 20, 1995
First Day City: 
Jupiter, Florida
Quantity Issued: 
30,000,000
Printed by: 
Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method: 
Lithographed
Format: 
Panes of 20 in sheets of 120
Perforations:  11.2

 

Why the stamp was issued:  To pay tribute to the recreational sports enjoyed by everyday Americans. 

 

About the stamp design:  The USPS wanted the Recreational Sports stamps to stand out from previous sports issues.  They brought in illustrator Don Weller, who created vivid, poster-style images of the athletes.  He produced a number of quick sketches before settling on the five used on the stamps.  He and the art director also consulted several sources to ensure the athletes were all positioned correctly for each sport. 

 

Weller based his image of a bowler on a photo of Hank Marino, who had been voted “Bowler of the Half-Century” in 1951.  The photo was provided by the Bowling Hall of Fame and Museum in St. Louis, Missouri.  After the stamp design had been shown to the public, Weller was asked to adjust his illustration, so it wouldn’t so closely resemble Marino.

 

First Day City:  The Recreational Sports stamps were issued at the Stamporee Stamp Expo at the Jupiter Beach Resort in Jupiter, Florida. 

 

Unusual facts about the Recreational Sports stamps:  A small number of freak panes were discovered in which the bottom left corners folded inward during the trimming stage.  As a result, the selvage was larger in those corners and they included the alignment and other marks that are normally discarded during the trimming stage.  These stamps have also been found imperforate as well as versions with the yellow omitted and the yellow, blue, and magenta omitted. 

 

About the Recreational Sports Set:  Several stamps had previously honored the Olympics and professional sports, but the USPS created these as a tribute to the most popular recreational sports in America.  

Additionally, three of the sports were celebrating centennial anniversaries in 1995.  The US Golf Association (USGA) had held its first championship at the Newport Golf Club in Rhode Island in 1895.  The American Bowling Congress was founded on September 9, 1895.  And volleyball was invented in 1895 by YMCA employee William G. Morgan.

 

History the stamp represents:  Every day, millions of Americans gather at diamonds, courts, lanes, and links to participate in their favorite recreational sport. The five Recreational Sports se-tenants honor these amateur athletes and the games they participate in.

 

Bowling is one of the oldest and most popular indoor sports. Although similar games were played as early as 5200 B.C., modern bowling dates back to the Middle Ages. In Germany the game was played at village dances, baptisms, and other celebrations. And in England bowling became so popular it was outlawed by Parliament, since it interfered with the archery practice so vital to the kingdom’s protection.

 

When Dutch settlers came to the New World, they brought their version of the game, which used nine pins, with them. A fashionable sport, the game spread throughout New England. By the mid-1800s, gambling on the sport became so rampant however, that bowling came to be considered a social evil, and in 1841 the Connecticut legislature outlawed “nine pins.” To evade the ban, a tenth pin was added.

 

By the early 19th century, bowling had become so popular that lanes were built throughout the US. In the 1950s machines were designed to set up the pins – a job which had been done by hand. This invention greatly speeded up the game, and soon as many as 24 lanes were being built under one roof. Today, millions of people visit bowling alleys; many enjoy the competition found in leagues, while others play merely for fun.

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U.S. #2963
1995 32¢ Bowling
Recreational Sports

 

  • Recreational Sports stamps honor popular sports enjoyed by everyday Americans
  • 1995 was the 100th anniversary of the American Bowling Congress

 

Stamp Category:  Commemorative
Set: 
Recreational Sports
Value: 
32¢, rate for first-class mail
First Day of Issue: 
May 20, 1995
First Day City: 
Jupiter, Florida
Quantity Issued: 
30,000,000
Printed by: 
Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method: 
Lithographed
Format: 
Panes of 20 in sheets of 120
Perforations:  11.2

 

Why the stamp was issued:  To pay tribute to the recreational sports enjoyed by everyday Americans. 

 

About the stamp design:  The USPS wanted the Recreational Sports stamps to stand out from previous sports issues.  They brought in illustrator Don Weller, who created vivid, poster-style images of the athletes.  He produced a number of quick sketches before settling on the five used on the stamps.  He and the art director also consulted several sources to ensure the athletes were all positioned correctly for each sport. 

 

Weller based his image of a bowler on a photo of Hank Marino, who had been voted “Bowler of the Half-Century” in 1951.  The photo was provided by the Bowling Hall of Fame and Museum in St. Louis, Missouri.  After the stamp design had been shown to the public, Weller was asked to adjust his illustration, so it wouldn’t so closely resemble Marino.

 

First Day City:  The Recreational Sports stamps were issued at the Stamporee Stamp Expo at the Jupiter Beach Resort in Jupiter, Florida. 

 

Unusual facts about the Recreational Sports stamps:  A small number of freak panes were discovered in which the bottom left corners folded inward during the trimming stage.  As a result, the selvage was larger in those corners and they included the alignment and other marks that are normally discarded during the trimming stage.  These stamps have also been found imperforate as well as versions with the yellow omitted and the yellow, blue, and magenta omitted. 

 

About the Recreational Sports Set:  Several stamps had previously honored the Olympics and professional sports, but the USPS created these as a tribute to the most popular recreational sports in America.  

Additionally, three of the sports were celebrating centennial anniversaries in 1995.  The US Golf Association (USGA) had held its first championship at the Newport Golf Club in Rhode Island in 1895.  The American Bowling Congress was founded on September 9, 1895.  And volleyball was invented in 1895 by YMCA employee William G. Morgan.

 

History the stamp represents:  Every day, millions of Americans gather at diamonds, courts, lanes, and links to participate in their favorite recreational sport. The five Recreational Sports se-tenants honor these amateur athletes and the games they participate in.

 

Bowling is one of the oldest and most popular indoor sports. Although similar games were played as early as 5200 B.C., modern bowling dates back to the Middle Ages. In Germany the game was played at village dances, baptisms, and other celebrations. And in England bowling became so popular it was outlawed by Parliament, since it interfered with the archery practice so vital to the kingdom’s protection.

 

When Dutch settlers came to the New World, they brought their version of the game, which used nine pins, with them. A fashionable sport, the game spread throughout New England. By the mid-1800s, gambling on the sport became so rampant however, that bowling came to be considered a social evil, and in 1841 the Connecticut legislature outlawed “nine pins.” To evade the ban, a tenth pin was added.

 

By the early 19th century, bowling had become so popular that lanes were built throughout the US. In the 1950s machines were designed to set up the pins – a job which had been done by hand. This invention greatly speeded up the game, and soon as many as 24 lanes were being built under one roof. Today, millions of people visit bowling alleys; many enjoy the competition found in leagues, while others play merely for fun.