2012 First-Class Forever Stamp,Earthscapes: Cranberry Harvest

# 4710j - 2012 First-Class Forever Stamp - Earthscapes: Cranberry Harvest

$2.25 - $3.75
(No reviews yet) Write a Review
Image Condition Price Qty
336672
Mint Stamp(s) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 3.25
$ 3.25
0
No Image
Used Single Stamp(s) Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days.
$ 2.25
$ 2.25
1
336671
Fleetwood First Day Cover Ships in 1-3 business days. Ships in 1-3 business days. Free with 950 Points
$ 3.75
$ 3.75
2
Mounts - Click Here
Mount Price Qty

 

U.S. #4710j
2012 45¢ Cranberry Harvest
Earthscapes
 
Issue Date: October 1, 2012
City:
Washington, DC
Quantity: 2,670,000
Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America, Sennett Security Products
Printing Method: Offset
Perforations: Die Cut 10 ¾
Color: multicolored
 
The crisp autumn winds blow over the flooded cranberry bogs of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Workers in their wading boots are knee-deep in cold water, harvesting the deep-red berries.
 
Native Americans introduced the early English settlers to the sour food which the Pilgrims called “bearberries” because bears enjoyed them as well. The Indians used cranberries for pemmican (a concentrated mixture of meat, fat, and berries), wound medicine, and dye. The English served them at their Thanksgiving feasts. After the Revolutionary War, veteran Henry Hall was the first to farm cranberries on Cape Cod in the early 1800s.
 
Cranberry vines grow in moist, acidic soil known as bogs. The bogs are flooded for harvest, usually from September through November. Water reels, or “eggbeaters,” loosen the berries from the vines, and the fruit floats to the top. They are corralled to a corner of the bog, loaded on trucks, and then sent to be processed.
 
Cranberry sauce has become as much a part of American Thanksgiving meals as the turkey. Many families open a can of jellied berries, but some start with fresh fruit and follow a time-tested recipe. The U.S. produced 681 million pounds of cranberries in 2011, and about 20% were eaten at Thanksgiving.
 

 

 

Read More - Click Here

 

U.S. #4710j
2012 45¢ Cranberry Harvest
Earthscapes
 
Issue Date: October 1, 2012
City:
Washington, DC
Quantity: 2,670,000
Printed By: Banknote Corporation of America, Sennett Security Products
Printing Method: Offset
Perforations: Die Cut 10 ¾
Color: multicolored
 
The crisp autumn winds blow over the flooded cranberry bogs of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Workers in their wading boots are knee-deep in cold water, harvesting the deep-red berries.
 
Native Americans introduced the early English settlers to the sour food which the Pilgrims called “bearberries” because bears enjoyed them as well. The Indians used cranberries for pemmican (a concentrated mixture of meat, fat, and berries), wound medicine, and dye. The English served them at their Thanksgiving feasts. After the Revolutionary War, veteran Henry Hall was the first to farm cranberries on Cape Cod in the early 1800s.
 
Cranberry vines grow in moist, acidic soil known as bogs. The bogs are flooded for harvest, usually from September through November. Water reels, or “eggbeaters,” loosen the berries from the vines, and the fruit floats to the top. They are corralled to a corner of the bog, loaded on trucks, and then sent to be processed.
 
Cranberry sauce has become as much a part of American Thanksgiving meals as the turkey. Many families open a can of jellied berries, but some start with fresh fruit and follow a time-tested recipe. The U.S. produced 681 million pounds of cranberries in 2011, and about 20% were eaten at Thanksgiving.