2020 First-Class Forever Stamps,Fruits and Vegetables: Carrots

# 5486 - 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Fruits and Vegetables: Carrots

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US #5486
2020 Carrots – Fruits and Vegetables

  • Celebrates the tradition of using fruits and vegetables as subjects for still lifes


Stamp Category: 
Definitive
Set:  Fruits and Vegetables
Value:  55¢ First Class Mail Rate (Forever)
First Day of Issue:  July 17, 2020
First Day City:  Charleston, West Virginia
Quantity Issued:  200,000,000
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Double-sided booklets of 20
Tagging:  Phosphor tagged paper, block

Why the stamps were issued:  To show off the simple beauty of fruits and vegetables.

About the stamp designs:  Pictures existing artwork of a bunch of carrots by Robert Papp.

First Day City:  According to the USPS, Charleston, West Virginia, was chosen for the First Day of Issue postmark because of the city’s famous Capitol Market, a year-round farmers’ market and nonprofit organization.  There was no First Day of Issue Ceremony due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

About the Fruits and Vegetables set:  Includes 10 different stamps designs all picturing a different fruit or vegetable still life by Robert Papp.

History the stamp represents:  Carrots originally came from Persia (now parts of Iran and Afghanistan), where they were domesticated from the wild species Daucus carota.  Today, carrots are grown all over the world in orange (most common), white, yellow, red, and purple varieties.  While the large root is the main food product, every part of the carrot plant is edible.

When people start to think about planting their garden, carrots are often one of the first plants they grow.  This is because they are fairly easy to manage.  Even in less-than-ideal conditions, the plants still produce well.  However, the best environment for carrots is full sun and rock-free soil with a neutral pH.  This allows the carrots to grow down with ease.

Carrot seeds can be sown directly into the garden in early spring and should be planted about four to six inches apart.  The soil should be kept moist in the early stages of growth.  Carrots may be slow to sprout, sometimes taking two to three weeks for leaves to appear.  Carrots mature and are ready for harvest 90 to 120 days from planting, depending on the variety.

No matter which carrot variety you choose for your garden, you are sure to have plenty to use in your kitchen.  The best part – you can proudly say you grew them yourself.

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US #5486
2020 Carrots – Fruits and Vegetables

  • Celebrates the tradition of using fruits and vegetables as subjects for still lifes


Stamp Category: 
Definitive
Set:  Fruits and Vegetables
Value:  55¢ First Class Mail Rate (Forever)
First Day of Issue:  July 17, 2020
First Day City:  Charleston, West Virginia
Quantity Issued:  200,000,000
Printed by:  Banknote Corporation of America
Printing Method:  Offset
Format:  Double-sided booklets of 20
Tagging:  Phosphor tagged paper, block

Why the stamps were issued:  To show off the simple beauty of fruits and vegetables.

About the stamp designs:  Pictures existing artwork of a bunch of carrots by Robert Papp.

First Day City:  According to the USPS, Charleston, West Virginia, was chosen for the First Day of Issue postmark because of the city’s famous Capitol Market, a year-round farmers’ market and nonprofit organization.  There was no First Day of Issue Ceremony due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

About the Fruits and Vegetables set:  Includes 10 different stamps designs all picturing a different fruit or vegetable still life by Robert Papp.

History the stamp represents:  Carrots originally came from Persia (now parts of Iran and Afghanistan), where they were domesticated from the wild species Daucus carota.  Today, carrots are grown all over the world in orange (most common), white, yellow, red, and purple varieties.  While the large root is the main food product, every part of the carrot plant is edible.

When people start to think about planting their garden, carrots are often one of the first plants they grow.  This is because they are fairly easy to manage.  Even in less-than-ideal conditions, the plants still produce well.  However, the best environment for carrots is full sun and rock-free soil with a neutral pH.  This allows the carrots to grow down with ease.

Carrot seeds can be sown directly into the garden in early spring and should be planted about four to six inches apart.  The soil should be kept moist in the early stages of growth.  Carrots may be slow to sprout, sometimes taking two to three weeks for leaves to appear.  Carrots mature and are ready for harvest 90 to 120 days from planting, depending on the variety.

No matter which carrot variety you choose for your garden, you are sure to have plenty to use in your kitchen.  The best part – you can proudly say you grew them yourself.