#122 – 1869 90c Lincoln, carmine/black

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 30 days. i$6,000.00
$6,000.00
camera Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1,900.00
$1,900.00
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 30 days. i$4,250.00
$4,250.00
- Used Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1,150.00
$1,150.00
3 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63625 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 30 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-3/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
$7.50
- MM769Mystic Black Mount Size 31/30 (15)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.95
$1.95
U.S. #122
1869 90¢ Lincoln Pictorial
G Grill


Earliest Known Use: May 10, 1869
Quantity issued:
 55,500
Printed by: National Bank Note Company
Method: Flat plate
Watermark: None
Perforation: 12
Color: Carmine and black
 
The Pictorial series came under attack the moment they were issued. They were considered radical at the time – square rather than rectangular, bi-color, and only three bore the traditional portraits Americans were accustomed to. To make matters worse, customers complained the gum wasn’t sticking properly.
 
The 90¢ Lincoln is the only stamp of the series that didn’t result in inverts. Only one is known on cover – the legendary “Ice House” cover sent from Boston to Calcutta. The cover was stolen from a collector in 1967 and its whereabouts were unknown until 2006, when an unsuspecting elderly couple brought it to a Chicago-area stamp dealer. 
 
The 1869 Pictorial Series
The appearance of the 1869 Pictorials marked a significant change in U.S. stamp design. For the first time in American postal history, something other than portraits of national leaders was being pictured on a stamp. These were the first U.S. stamps to be printed using two colors.
 
Printing with two colors required the stamps to be run through the press twice; once, to print the vignette (center design), and then again, to print the frame. Carelessness in merging the two impressions resulted in the rare inverts. Instead of an inverted center, the stamp actually has an inverted frame, since the center design was printed first. The 30¢ Shield and Eagle with inverted flags is the rarest of the 1869 inverts. The least obvious of the three, it was the last to be discovered.
 
The pictorials were to be produced over a four-year period by the National Bank Note Company. When issued, however, the stamps were unpopular with the public. Within a year after their release, they were withdrawn from sale.
 
Today, the pictorial issues are the most popular of the 1840 – 1870 Classic Stamps. Because the stamps were only in circulation for a year, they have become increasingly hard to find in both unused and used condition.
 
 
Read More - Click Here

  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2017 Commemorative Year Set 2017 U.S. Commemorative Year Set

    Get every US commemorative stamp issued in 2017.  Each stamp showcases important history, people, and events from American culture.  With this set you'll receive stamps from popular series like Lunar New Year and Love.  Plus you'll receive the Nebraska and Mississippi Statehood stamps, Dorothy Height, John F. Kennedy, and more.  It's the convenient and affordable way to keep your collection up to date.

    $31.95- $55.95
    BUY NOW
  • 1847 5¢ Benjamin Franklin, red-brown, thin bluish wove paper, imperforate U.S. #1 - First U.S. Postage Stamp

    On July 1, 1847, the first US postage stamps went on sale.  The 5¢ issue of 1847 (US #1) features a portrait of Benjamin Franklin, the man responsible for organizing America's postal service back in the 1700s.  Postal clerks used scissors to cut the stamps from sheets, as perforations weren't in use yet.  Today, US #1 is a valued piece of American postal history and a lucky find in any condition.

    $450.00- $7,395.00
    BUY NOW

U.S. #122
1869 90¢ Lincoln Pictorial
G Grill


Earliest Known Use: May 10, 1869
Quantity issued:
 55,500
Printed by: National Bank Note Company
Method: Flat plate
Watermark: None
Perforation: 12
Color: Carmine and black
 
The Pictorial series came under attack the moment they were issued. They were considered radical at the time – square rather than rectangular, bi-color, and only three bore the traditional portraits Americans were accustomed to. To make matters worse, customers complained the gum wasn’t sticking properly.
 
The 90¢ Lincoln is the only stamp of the series that didn’t result in inverts. Only one is known on cover – the legendary “Ice House” cover sent from Boston to Calcutta. The cover was stolen from a collector in 1967 and its whereabouts were unknown until 2006, when an unsuspecting elderly couple brought it to a Chicago-area stamp dealer. 
 
The 1869 Pictorial Series
The appearance of the 1869 Pictorials marked a significant change in U.S. stamp design. For the first time in American postal history, something other than portraits of national leaders was being pictured on a stamp. These were the first U.S. stamps to be printed using two colors.
 
Printing with two colors required the stamps to be run through the press twice; once, to print the vignette (center design), and then again, to print the frame. Carelessness in merging the two impressions resulted in the rare inverts. Instead of an inverted center, the stamp actually has an inverted frame, since the center design was printed first. The 30¢ Shield and Eagle with inverted flags is the rarest of the 1869 inverts. The least obvious of the three, it was the last to be discovered.
 
The pictorials were to be produced over a four-year period by the National Bank Note Company. When issued, however, the stamps were unpopular with the public. Within a year after their release, they were withdrawn from sale.
 
Today, the pictorial issues are the most popular of the 1840 – 1870 Classic Stamps. Because the stamps were only in circulation for a year, they have become increasingly hard to find in both unused and used condition.