#1236 – 1963 5c Eleanor Roosevelt

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U.S. #1236
1963 5¢ Eleanor Roosevelt 
 
Issue Date: October 1, 1963
City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 133,170,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:  11 x 10 ½
Color: Bright Purple
 
U.S. #1236 was issued in honor of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, less than a year after her death. Roosevelt was one of the most influential women of the 20th century. 
 
Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962)
Born Anna Eleanor Roosevelt in New York City, she never used her first name. In 1936, Eleanor married her distant cousin, Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1921, Franklin was stricken with polio and permanently disabled. Later, when Franklin served as governor of New York and then President of the United States, Eleanor served as his eyes and ears, frequently making fact-finding trips.
 
Historians consider Eleanor the most active first lady in American history. She traveled the nation lecturing, held 350 press conferences for women reporters only, wrote a daily newspaper column, and contributed frequently to magazines. She was well known for working to help the poor, minorities, and young people. Eleanor often went out of her way to meet the people and stay informed, visiting factories and hospitals to see “her people.”
 
Her public service continued after Franklin’s death in 1945. She served as a delegate to the United Nations until 1951. In 1946, Eleanor was elected chairman of the U.N.’s Human Rights Commission. She played a key role in writing the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy appointed her to head the Commission on the Status of Women.
 
 
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U.S. #1236
1963 5¢ Eleanor Roosevelt 
 
Issue Date: October 1, 1963
City: Washington, D.C.
Quantity: 133,170,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Rotary Press
Perforations:  11 x 10 ½
Color: Bright Purple
 
U.S. #1236 was issued in honor of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, less than a year after her death. Roosevelt was one of the most influential women of the 20th century. 
 
Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962)
Born Anna Eleanor Roosevelt in New York City, she never used her first name. In 1936, Eleanor married her distant cousin, Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1921, Franklin was stricken with polio and permanently disabled. Later, when Franklin served as governor of New York and then President of the United States, Eleanor served as his eyes and ears, frequently making fact-finding trips.
 
Historians consider Eleanor the most active first lady in American history. She traveled the nation lecturing, held 350 press conferences for women reporters only, wrote a daily newspaper column, and contributed frequently to magazines. She was well known for working to help the poor, minorities, and young people. Eleanor often went out of her way to meet the people and stay informed, visiting factories and hospitals to see “her people.”
 
Her public service continued after Franklin’s death in 1945. She served as a delegate to the United Nations until 1951. In 1946, Eleanor was elected chairman of the U.N.’s Human Rights Commission. She played a key role in writing the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy appointed her to head the Commission on the Status of Women.