#1282 – 1965 4c Prominent Americans: Abraham Lincoln

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U.S. #1282
4¢ Abraham Lincoln
Prominent Americans Series
 
Issue Date: November 19, 1965
City: New York, NY
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Rotary Press
Color: Black
 
Prominent Americans Series
The Prominent Americans Series recognizes people who played important roles in U.S. history. Officials originally planned to honor 18 individuals, but later added seven others. The Prominent Americans Series began with the 4¢ Lincoln stamp, which was issued on November 10, 1965. During the course of the series, the 6¢ Eisenhower stamp was reissued with an 8¢ denomination and the 5¢ Washington was redrawn.
 
A number of technological changes developed during the course of producing the series, resulting in a number of varieties due to gum, luminescence, precancels and perforations plus sheet, coil and booklet formats. Additionally, seven rate changes occurred while the Prominent Americans Series was current, giving collectors who specialize in first and last day of issue covers an abundance of collecting opportunities.
 
The 4¢ denomination features Abraham Lincoln as its subject. Born in a one-room log cabin in Kentucky, Lincoln (1809-65) was the first U.S. President born outside the original thirteen colonies. During his childhood, Lincoln’s family moved first to Indiana, then settled in Illinois.
Lincoln was an avid reader with a quest for knowledge. Although he received less than 18 months of formal education, Lincoln’s self-education was extensive. 
 
At 22, Lincoln moved to New Salem, Illinois. He supported himself by working a variety of odd jobs, including shopkeeper, postmaster, surveyor, and rail-splitter. Unusually tall and strong, Lincoln was an able wrestler and talented with an axe. He served as captain of the local militia during the Black Hawk War and was widely respected by the men in his command.
 
Although he despised the nickname, Lincoln began to be known as the “Rail-Splitter” during the 1860 presidential campaign. To emphasize his humble beginnings, supporters marched into the Illinois State Republican Convention holding split rails painted with the slogan “Abraham Lincoln, The Rail Candidate for President in 1860.” Because of – or perhaps despite – the nickname, Lincoln won the nomination and the presidential election.
 

Postmaster Lincoln

On May 7, 1833, future President Abraham Lincoln took a job as postmaster for New Salem, Illinois.

In 1831, 22-year-old Lincoln joined with a couple of friends in floating a flatboat down the Sangamon River to New Orleans.  He was working as a bow hand, ferrying surplus farm products to the South.

Along the way, the boat got stuck on a milldam near New Salem, Illinois.  A crowd of people gathered by the water to watch the men free their boat.  Some took notice of the tall, thin man who took charge and successfully got the boat free.  Upon hearing of his leadership in freeing the boat, Denton Offutt, who’d hired Lincoln to man the boat, offered him a job as a clerk in his store there.  But when Lincoln returned from New Orleans, the shop wasn’t open yet, so he took on a variety of other jobs.

While he was in New Salem, Lincoln briefly served as a captain in the militia during an uprising by Chief Black Hawk.  Also in New Salem, he ran for the legislature, stating, “Fellow citizens, I presume you all know who I am.  I am humble Abraham Lincoln.  I have been solicited by many friends to become a candidate for the legislature.  My policies are short and sweet, like the old woman’s dance.  I am in favor of a National Bank, I am in favor of the internal improvement system, and a high protective tariff.  These are my sentiments and political principles.  If elected I shall be thankful; and if not, it will be all the same.”

Lincoln lost the election but the experience gave him an interest in politics that he would always keep with him.  By early 1833, he was out of a job.  But on May 7th, he was appointed postmaster of New Salem.  It’s unknown exactly how Lincoln was selected, but one source claimed that the women of New Salem were upset that the current postmaster spent more time serving the men whiskey than he did attending to his postal duties.

Lincoln enjoyed his time as postmaster and was popular among his customers for his habit of going out of the way to keep them happy.  If he knew one of his customers was waiting for an important letter, he would walk several miles to deliver it as soon as possible.  Even though he had to work several jobs to make ends meet, Lincoln would help out the people that couldn’t afford to pay their mail bills.  And in one case, a friend turned him in for delivering unpaid mail.  Lincoln had to pay a $10 fine for this.

Lincoln remained in his post until May 30, 1836, when the post office closed.  At the time, the Post Office Department didn’t request the balance of about $16 that Lincoln had left over from his postal services.  A few months later, they finally requested it.  And even though Lincoln had been struggling financially, he provided the exact amount in the same coins it had been paid in by his customers, proving his nickname, “Honest Abe,” to be quite true.

In 1914, Harry Truman was appointed postmaster of Grandview, Missouri.  He held the position only in title, handing the work and its pay over to Ella Hall, the widow of a Civil War veteran who needed the money.  He remained in the post for less than a year.  Because he didn’t personally carry out the tasks of postmaster, Lincoln is generally considered the only future president to truly serve as a postmaster.

Click here for more Lincoln stamps.

 
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U.S. #1282
4¢ Abraham Lincoln
Prominent Americans Series
 
Issue Date: November 19, 1965
City: New York, NY
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Rotary Press
Color: Black
 
Prominent Americans Series
The Prominent Americans Series recognizes people who played important roles in U.S. history. Officials originally planned to honor 18 individuals, but later added seven others. The Prominent Americans Series began with the 4¢ Lincoln stamp, which was issued on November 10, 1965. During the course of the series, the 6¢ Eisenhower stamp was reissued with an 8¢ denomination and the 5¢ Washington was redrawn.
 
A number of technological changes developed during the course of producing the series, resulting in a number of varieties due to gum, luminescence, precancels and perforations plus sheet, coil and booklet formats. Additionally, seven rate changes occurred while the Prominent Americans Series was current, giving collectors who specialize in first and last day of issue covers an abundance of collecting opportunities.
 
The 4¢ denomination features Abraham Lincoln as its subject. Born in a one-room log cabin in Kentucky, Lincoln (1809-65) was the first U.S. President born outside the original thirteen colonies. During his childhood, Lincoln’s family moved first to Indiana, then settled in Illinois.
Lincoln was an avid reader with a quest for knowledge. Although he received less than 18 months of formal education, Lincoln’s self-education was extensive. 
 
At 22, Lincoln moved to New Salem, Illinois. He supported himself by working a variety of odd jobs, including shopkeeper, postmaster, surveyor, and rail-splitter. Unusually tall and strong, Lincoln was an able wrestler and talented with an axe. He served as captain of the local militia during the Black Hawk War and was widely respected by the men in his command.
 
Although he despised the nickname, Lincoln began to be known as the “Rail-Splitter” during the 1860 presidential campaign. To emphasize his humble beginnings, supporters marched into the Illinois State Republican Convention holding split rails painted with the slogan “Abraham Lincoln, The Rail Candidate for President in 1860.” Because of – or perhaps despite – the nickname, Lincoln won the nomination and the presidential election.
 

Postmaster Lincoln

On May 7, 1833, future President Abraham Lincoln took a job as postmaster for New Salem, Illinois.

In 1831, 22-year-old Lincoln joined with a couple of friends in floating a flatboat down the Sangamon River to New Orleans.  He was working as a bow hand, ferrying surplus farm products to the South.

Along the way, the boat got stuck on a milldam near New Salem, Illinois.  A crowd of people gathered by the water to watch the men free their boat.  Some took notice of the tall, thin man who took charge and successfully got the boat free.  Upon hearing of his leadership in freeing the boat, Denton Offutt, who’d hired Lincoln to man the boat, offered him a job as a clerk in his store there.  But when Lincoln returned from New Orleans, the shop wasn’t open yet, so he took on a variety of other jobs.

While he was in New Salem, Lincoln briefly served as a captain in the militia during an uprising by Chief Black Hawk.  Also in New Salem, he ran for the legislature, stating, “Fellow citizens, I presume you all know who I am.  I am humble Abraham Lincoln.  I have been solicited by many friends to become a candidate for the legislature.  My policies are short and sweet, like the old woman’s dance.  I am in favor of a National Bank, I am in favor of the internal improvement system, and a high protective tariff.  These are my sentiments and political principles.  If elected I shall be thankful; and if not, it will be all the same.”

Lincoln lost the election but the experience gave him an interest in politics that he would always keep with him.  By early 1833, he was out of a job.  But on May 7th, he was appointed postmaster of New Salem.  It’s unknown exactly how Lincoln was selected, but one source claimed that the women of New Salem were upset that the current postmaster spent more time serving the men whiskey than he did attending to his postal duties.

Lincoln enjoyed his time as postmaster and was popular among his customers for his habit of going out of the way to keep them happy.  If he knew one of his customers was waiting for an important letter, he would walk several miles to deliver it as soon as possible.  Even though he had to work several jobs to make ends meet, Lincoln would help out the people that couldn’t afford to pay their mail bills.  And in one case, a friend turned him in for delivering unpaid mail.  Lincoln had to pay a $10 fine for this.

Lincoln remained in his post until May 30, 1836, when the post office closed.  At the time, the Post Office Department didn’t request the balance of about $16 that Lincoln had left over from his postal services.  A few months later, they finally requested it.  And even though Lincoln had been struggling financially, he provided the exact amount in the same coins it had been paid in by his customers, proving his nickname, “Honest Abe,” to be quite true.

In 1914, Harry Truman was appointed postmaster of Grandview, Missouri.  He held the position only in title, handing the work and its pay over to Ella Hall, the widow of a Civil War veteran who needed the money.  He remained in the post for less than a year.  Because he didn’t personally carry out the tasks of postmaster, Lincoln is generally considered the only future president to truly serve as a postmaster.

Click here for more Lincoln stamps.