#1286 – 1967 10c Prominent Americans: Andrew Jackson

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U.S. #1286
10¢ Andrew Jackson
Prominent Americans Series

Issue Date: March 15, 1967
City: Hermitage, TN
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Rotary press
Color: Lilac
 
Prominent Americans Series
The Prominent Americans Series recognizes people who played important roles in U.S. history. Officials originally planned to honor 18 individuals, but later added seven others. The Prominent Americans Series began with the 4¢ Lincoln stamp, which was issued on November 10, 1965. During the course of the series, the 6¢ Eisenhower stamp was reissued with an 8¢ denomination and the 5¢ Washington was redrawn.
 
A number of technological changes developed during the course of producing the series, resulting in a number of varieties due to gum, luminescence, precancels and perforations plus sheet, coil and booklet formats. Additionally, seven rate changes occurred while the Prominent Americans Series was current, giving collectors who specialize in first and last day of issue covers an abundance of collecting opportunities.
 
Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) was the son of poor Scotch-Irish immigrants and the first United States President to be born in a log cabin. His father died a few days before Jackson was born. At the age of 13, he served in the American Revolutionary War as an orderly.   He was captured by the British in April 1781. 
 
A British officer ordered Jackson to clean his boots, but the boy refused, claiming he had rights as a prisoner. The officer lashed out at Jackson with his sword, cut his hand to the bone, and left a deep gash in his head. The officer then forced Jackson and his brother Robert to march 40 miles to a military prison. The boys contracted smallpox, and although their mother secured their release, Robert soon died of the disease. Mrs. Jackson died a short time later, making Jackson an orphan at the age of 14.
 
Strong-willed and highly ambitious, Jackson moved to Tennessee, where he became a successful lawyer and landowner. Jackson served as general during the War of 1812 and earned fame for his stunning victory at the Battle of New Orleans. He also became known as a fierce Indian fighter. His soldiers gave him the nickname, “Old Hickory,” because of his toughness.
 
Jackson’s military success earned him widespread popularity as a candidate for the U.S. presidency. In 1822, the Tennessee legislature nominated Jackson as a candidate for the presidency for the 1824 election. The state elected him to the U.S. Senate in 1823. In the 1824 election, Jackson won the popular vote but lost the election in the House of Representatives, which voted by states. However, in 1828, Jackson won a landslide victory. The election of 1832 was the first to use national political conventions. Previously, presidential candidates were nominated by state legislatures, mass meetings, or congressional congresses. Again, Jackson won by an overwhelming margin.
 
President Jackson strengthened the power of the U. S. presidential office. He vetoed 12 bills passed by Congress – more than all previous Presidents combined! He also worked to preserve the power of the Federal government. Additionally, Jackson brought many changes to the U.S. government and its presidential election process. The term, Age of Jackson, is used to describe the 20-year period after he took office. Historians also describe the many reforms made during this time with the term Jacksonian Democracy.
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U.S. #1286
10¢ Andrew Jackson
Prominent Americans Series

Issue Date: March 15, 1967
City: Hermitage, TN
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Rotary press
Color: Lilac
 
Prominent Americans Series
The Prominent Americans Series recognizes people who played important roles in U.S. history. Officials originally planned to honor 18 individuals, but later added seven others. The Prominent Americans Series began with the 4¢ Lincoln stamp, which was issued on November 10, 1965. During the course of the series, the 6¢ Eisenhower stamp was reissued with an 8¢ denomination and the 5¢ Washington was redrawn.
 
A number of technological changes developed during the course of producing the series, resulting in a number of varieties due to gum, luminescence, precancels and perforations plus sheet, coil and booklet formats. Additionally, seven rate changes occurred while the Prominent Americans Series was current, giving collectors who specialize in first and last day of issue covers an abundance of collecting opportunities.
 
Andrew Jackson
Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) was the son of poor Scotch-Irish immigrants and the first United States President to be born in a log cabin. His father died a few days before Jackson was born. At the age of 13, he served in the American Revolutionary War as an orderly.   He was captured by the British in April 1781. 
 
A British officer ordered Jackson to clean his boots, but the boy refused, claiming he had rights as a prisoner. The officer lashed out at Jackson with his sword, cut his hand to the bone, and left a deep gash in his head. The officer then forced Jackson and his brother Robert to march 40 miles to a military prison. The boys contracted smallpox, and although their mother secured their release, Robert soon died of the disease. Mrs. Jackson died a short time later, making Jackson an orphan at the age of 14.
 
Strong-willed and highly ambitious, Jackson moved to Tennessee, where he became a successful lawyer and landowner. Jackson served as general during the War of 1812 and earned fame for his stunning victory at the Battle of New Orleans. He also became known as a fierce Indian fighter. His soldiers gave him the nickname, “Old Hickory,” because of his toughness.
 
Jackson’s military success earned him widespread popularity as a candidate for the U.S. presidency. In 1822, the Tennessee legislature nominated Jackson as a candidate for the presidency for the 1824 election. The state elected him to the U.S. Senate in 1823. In the 1824 election, Jackson won the popular vote but lost the election in the House of Representatives, which voted by states. However, in 1828, Jackson won a landslide victory. The election of 1832 was the first to use national political conventions. Previously, presidential candidates were nominated by state legislatures, mass meetings, or congressional congresses. Again, Jackson won by an overwhelming margin.
 
President Jackson strengthened the power of the U. S. presidential office. He vetoed 12 bills passed by Congress – more than all previous Presidents combined! He also worked to preserve the power of the Federal government. Additionally, Jackson brought many changes to the U.S. government and its presidential election process. The term, Age of Jackson, is used to describe the 20-year period after he took office. Historians also describe the many reforms made during this time with the term Jacksonian Democracy.