#1358a – 1968 6c Arkansas River Navigation

U.S. #1358a Tagging Omitted
6¢ Arkansas River Navigation

Issue Date:  October 1, 1968
City:  Little Rock, AR
Printed By:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:  11
Color:  Bright blue, dark blue and black

The Arkansas River Navigation System

1968 Arkansas River Navigation stamp
US #1358 was issued for the opening of navigation in 1968.

On June 5, 1971, the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System (MKARNS) was officially dedicated after decades of work.  One of the largest civil works projects up to that time, it accounts for more than $1billion in trade transportation each for Arkansas and Oklahoma.

1968 Tagging omitted Arkansas River Navigation stamp
US #1358a – tagging omitted Arkansas River Navigation stamp

As early as the 1920s, there had been calls for river development in Arkansas and Oklahoma.  Frequent flooding had caused significant damage, and many hoped this could be prevented.  A group of concerned citizens founded the Arkansas River Flood Control Association (ARFCA) to lobby Congress for a flood control program.  Congress passed a flood control act within a year.

1968 Arkansas River Navigation Fleetwood First Day Cover.
US #1358 – Fleetwood First Day Cover

In 1935, the US Army Corps of Engineers claimed that the project was possible, but the cost was too high, especially during the Depression.  However, independent estimates for the project were much lower and Congress decided to move forward with the project.  In 1936, they passed a flood control act that established the Southwestern Division of the Corps of Engineers that began working on the Upper Arkansas, Red, White, and Black River basins.

1968 Arkansas River Navigation Classic First Day Cover
US #1358 – Classic First Day Cover

A decade later there were more calls for improvements to the Arkansas River navigation system.  On July 24, 1946, Congress passed the Rivers and Harbors Act, providing $55 million for the Arkansas-Verdigris Waterway.  The plan included funding for hydropower, flood control, recreation areas, and navigation.  Additional funding would be provided year by year on a dam-by-dam basis.  Arkansas Senator John L. McClellan was on the Senate Appropriations Committee and Governor Robert S. Kerr became a junior Oklahoma senator, so they could push for continued Congressional support of the project.  It would later be renamed in their honor.

1966 Einstein stamp
US #1285 – Einstein’s son solved a complicated engineering problem.

In the coming years, new bills secured more funding for the project including flood protection, bridges, reservoirs, and more.  The project was put on hold during the Korean War.  In the 1950s, they faced a major engineering challenge.  In an average year, 100 million tons of silt flowed down the river that could impede navigation.  Hans Albert Einstein (son of Albert Einstein) found the solution.  He developed a way for the river to clean itself to reduce the sediment flow.  Parts of the river would be deepened, straightened, and narrowed so the river would flow faster and flush out sediment.  The plan worked so well, $31 million was able to be removed from the budget that would have been spent on dams to trap that sediment.

1995 Nixon stamp
US #2955 – Nixon spoke at the system’s dedication in 1971.

On October 4, 1968, navigation on the river was opened to Little Rock.  By December 30, 1970, the system was ready for full use.  The first commercial barge entered the Port of Muskogee on January 3, 1971.  The system stretched 443 miles and included 17 locks and dams (today there are 18).

On June 5, 1971, the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System was officially dedicated in a special ceremony at the Tulsa Port of Catoosa.  President Richard Nixon was the keynote speaker.  The system has proven its worth, handling millions of tons of products each year that saves hundreds of companies money by using water transportation.  The system also provides flood control, hydropower, water supply, wildlife conservation, and recreation.  It’s been estimated that MKARNS prevented more than $1.3 billion in flood damages between 1974 and 1987 alone.  Additionally, it produces electricity at about half the cost of coal.

View a map of the MKARNS.

What is Phosphorescent Tagging and Why is it Important?

Tagging of U.S. stamps was introduced in 1963 with airmail stamp #C64a. It helps the U.S. Post Office use automation to move the mail at a lower cost. A virtually invisible phosphorescent material is applied either to stamp ink or paper, or to stamps after printing. This “taggant” causes each one to glow in shades of green (red on older airmails) for a moment after exposure to short-wave ultraviolet (UV) light. The afterglow makes it possible for facing-canceling machines to locate the stamp on the mail piece, and properly position it for automated cancellation and sorting.

Some stamps have been printed with and without tagging intentionally, but when tagging is omitted by accident, we collectors are treated to a scarce modern color error. Our stamp experts examined thousands of stamps to find these just for you. Now you can easily give your error collection a boost or explore this fascinating new area of collecting. Quantities are limited, so order your untagged error stamp right away.

And find more tagging omitted stamps here.

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U.S. #1358a Tagging Omitted
6¢ Arkansas River Navigation

Issue Date:  October 1, 1968
City:  Little Rock, AR
Printed By:  Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method: Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:  11
Color:  Bright blue, dark blue and black

The Arkansas River Navigation System

1968 Arkansas River Navigation stamp
US #1358 was issued for the opening of navigation in 1968.

On June 5, 1971, the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System (MKARNS) was officially dedicated after decades of work.  One of the largest civil works projects up to that time, it accounts for more than $1billion in trade transportation each for Arkansas and Oklahoma.

1968 Tagging omitted Arkansas River Navigation stamp
US #1358a – tagging omitted Arkansas River Navigation stamp

As early as the 1920s, there had been calls for river development in Arkansas and Oklahoma.  Frequent flooding had caused significant damage, and many hoped this could be prevented.  A group of concerned citizens founded the Arkansas River Flood Control Association (ARFCA) to lobby Congress for a flood control program.  Congress passed a flood control act within a year.

1968 Arkansas River Navigation Fleetwood First Day Cover.
US #1358 – Fleetwood First Day Cover

In 1935, the US Army Corps of Engineers claimed that the project was possible, but the cost was too high, especially during the Depression.  However, independent estimates for the project were much lower and Congress decided to move forward with the project.  In 1936, they passed a flood control act that established the Southwestern Division of the Corps of Engineers that began working on the Upper Arkansas, Red, White, and Black River basins.

1968 Arkansas River Navigation Classic First Day Cover
US #1358 – Classic First Day Cover

A decade later there were more calls for improvements to the Arkansas River navigation system.  On July 24, 1946, Congress passed the Rivers and Harbors Act, providing $55 million for the Arkansas-Verdigris Waterway.  The plan included funding for hydropower, flood control, recreation areas, and navigation.  Additional funding would be provided year by year on a dam-by-dam basis.  Arkansas Senator John L. McClellan was on the Senate Appropriations Committee and Governor Robert S. Kerr became a junior Oklahoma senator, so they could push for continued Congressional support of the project.  It would later be renamed in their honor.

1966 Einstein stamp
US #1285 – Einstein’s son solved a complicated engineering problem.

In the coming years, new bills secured more funding for the project including flood protection, bridges, reservoirs, and more.  The project was put on hold during the Korean War.  In the 1950s, they faced a major engineering challenge.  In an average year, 100 million tons of silt flowed down the river that could impede navigation.  Hans Albert Einstein (son of Albert Einstein) found the solution.  He developed a way for the river to clean itself to reduce the sediment flow.  Parts of the river would be deepened, straightened, and narrowed so the river would flow faster and flush out sediment.  The plan worked so well, $31 million was able to be removed from the budget that would have been spent on dams to trap that sediment.

1995 Nixon stamp
US #2955 – Nixon spoke at the system’s dedication in 1971.

On October 4, 1968, navigation on the river was opened to Little Rock.  By December 30, 1970, the system was ready for full use.  The first commercial barge entered the Port of Muskogee on January 3, 1971.  The system stretched 443 miles and included 17 locks and dams (today there are 18).

On June 5, 1971, the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System was officially dedicated in a special ceremony at the Tulsa Port of Catoosa.  President Richard Nixon was the keynote speaker.  The system has proven its worth, handling millions of tons of products each year that saves hundreds of companies money by using water transportation.  The system also provides flood control, hydropower, water supply, wildlife conservation, and recreation.  It’s been estimated that MKARNS prevented more than $1.3 billion in flood damages between 1974 and 1987 alone.  Additionally, it produces electricity at about half the cost of coal.

View a map of the MKARNS.

What is Phosphorescent Tagging and Why is it Important?

Tagging of U.S. stamps was introduced in 1963 with airmail stamp #C64a. It helps the U.S. Post Office use automation to move the mail at a lower cost. A virtually invisible phosphorescent material is applied either to stamp ink or paper, or to stamps after printing. This “taggant” causes each one to glow in shades of green (red on older airmails) for a moment after exposure to short-wave ultraviolet (UV) light. The afterglow makes it possible for facing-canceling machines to locate the stamp on the mail piece, and properly position it for automated cancellation and sorting.

Some stamps have been printed with and without tagging intentionally, but when tagging is omitted by accident, we collectors are treated to a scarce modern color error. Our stamp experts examined thousands of stamps to find these just for you. Now you can easily give your error collection a boost or explore this fascinating new area of collecting. Quantities are limited, so order your untagged error stamp right away.

And find more tagging omitted stamps here.