#2036 – 1983 20c US - Sweden

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$1.00FREE with 200 points!
$1.00
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.20
$0.20
6 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM636215x30mm 25 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.75
$7.75
- MM50145x30mm 50 Horizontal Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420245x30mm 50 Horizontal Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #2036
20¢ U.S.-Sweden
 
Issue Date: March 24, 1983
City: Philadelphia, PA
Quantity: 118,225,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Engraved
Perforations
: 11
Color: Blue, black and red brown
 
Commemorates the 200th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Amity and Commerce between Sweden and the United States. The treaty - the first such treaty between the U.S. and another nation - was a pledge between the two countries to keep lasting peace and friendship.
 
U.S. #2036 was designed by Czeslaw Slania, court engraver of Sweden.
 

Treaty of Amity and Commerce with Sweden

In April 1782, Benjamin Franklin and other American Peace Commissioners began peace talks with Great Britain, in the hopes of bringing about an end to the Revolutionary War.  As soon as these talks began, Sweden’s King Gustavus III immediately pushed for a treaty of his own with the United States.

Gustavus wanted Sweden to be the first country not at war with England to establish an alliance with America.  He also specifically requested that the talks be negotiated with Benjamin Franklin, for whom he had great respect.  Congress agreed to the talks and made Franklin Minister Plenipotentiary to Sweden.  Congress was anxious for Franklin to secure the treaty, as it would mean recognition of American independence by another European nation.

Because Franklin was already in Paris for the British talks, the meetings were held there with the Swedish ambassador to the court of France, Count Gustaf Philip Creutz.  Franklin and Cruetz began their discussions on December 18, 1782.  Each of them had proposed treaties from their own governments that they compared.  The US had a treaty with 18 articles and Sweden one with 27.  The American proposal was based on a drafted treaty with the Netherlands, while the Swedish one was based on a recently completed Dutch-American one.

Franklin and Cruetz found that the two treaties differed on several points.  Cruetz then forwarded the American draft to his king and the negotiations slowed, as they waited for an answer.  In the meantime, the US and England reached an armistice on January 20, 1783, bringing an end to the fighting. Within days, Cruetz reported back to the king that Franklin agreed to accept the Swedish treaty as it had been written.  As the US and British treaties moved forward, Cruetz was anxious to complete his treaty, so that Sweden could be the first to sign a treaty with the new nation. 

So on the morning of February 5, he and Franklin both signed the treaty.  Franklin also agreed to keep the treaty secret until it was ratified to prevent other powers from rushing to get theirs done too.  The same day they signed the treaty, Cruetz received word from his king not to sign anything until the US-British treaty was published in London.  So Cruetz and Franklin then signed an undated version of the treaty and burned the previous dated versions.  While they waited for final word on the US-British treaty, King Gustavus sent back word that he would agree to add four articles from the American treaty to the Swedish one.  Franklin and Cruetz then added in these new articles and signed the documents on March 5.  They were still waiting to hear about the US-British treaty, but were in a rush to complete their work.  So they dated the documents April 3, 1783.  Sweden ratified the treaty on May 23 and Congress on September 25.  The ratifications were then exchanged in Paris on February 6, 1784.

 
 
Read More - Click Here


  • Imperforate Stamp Club Introductory Offer - 2015 49c A Charlie Brown Christmas Join Mystic's Imperforate Stamp Club and Save 30%

    Collect some of the scarcest US stamps issued in the last decade.  From 2012 to 2016, the USPS issued extremely limited quantities of imperforate stamps (as few as 10,000 in some cases).  On sale for just four years, it can be difficult to find them anywhere today.

    $18.95
    BUY NOW
  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • US Stamp Starter Kit U.S. Stamp Starter Kit

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S. stamps that are easy to find and buy.  As a bonus, we’ll include 100 used U.S. stamps, 1,000 hinges for attaching stamps in their album, and Mystic’s Guide to Stamp Collecting – all for FREE.  It’s a terrific value.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #2036
20¢ U.S.-Sweden
 
Issue Date: March 24, 1983
City: Philadelphia, PA
Quantity: 118,225,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Engraved
Perforations
: 11
Color: Blue, black and red brown
 
Commemorates the 200th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Amity and Commerce between Sweden and the United States. The treaty - the first such treaty between the U.S. and another nation - was a pledge between the two countries to keep lasting peace and friendship.
 
U.S. #2036 was designed by Czeslaw Slania, court engraver of Sweden.
 

Treaty of Amity and Commerce with Sweden

In April 1782, Benjamin Franklin and other American Peace Commissioners began peace talks with Great Britain, in the hopes of bringing about an end to the Revolutionary War.  As soon as these talks began, Sweden’s King Gustavus III immediately pushed for a treaty of his own with the United States.

Gustavus wanted Sweden to be the first country not at war with England to establish an alliance with America.  He also specifically requested that the talks be negotiated with Benjamin Franklin, for whom he had great respect.  Congress agreed to the talks and made Franklin Minister Plenipotentiary to Sweden.  Congress was anxious for Franklin to secure the treaty, as it would mean recognition of American independence by another European nation.

Because Franklin was already in Paris for the British talks, the meetings were held there with the Swedish ambassador to the court of France, Count Gustaf Philip Creutz.  Franklin and Cruetz began their discussions on December 18, 1782.  Each of them had proposed treaties from their own governments that they compared.  The US had a treaty with 18 articles and Sweden one with 27.  The American proposal was based on a drafted treaty with the Netherlands, while the Swedish one was based on a recently completed Dutch-American one.

Franklin and Cruetz found that the two treaties differed on several points.  Cruetz then forwarded the American draft to his king and the negotiations slowed, as they waited for an answer.  In the meantime, the US and England reached an armistice on January 20, 1783, bringing an end to the fighting. Within days, Cruetz reported back to the king that Franklin agreed to accept the Swedish treaty as it had been written.  As the US and British treaties moved forward, Cruetz was anxious to complete his treaty, so that Sweden could be the first to sign a treaty with the new nation. 

So on the morning of February 5, he and Franklin both signed the treaty.  Franklin also agreed to keep the treaty secret until it was ratified to prevent other powers from rushing to get theirs done too.  The same day they signed the treaty, Cruetz received word from his king not to sign anything until the US-British treaty was published in London.  So Cruetz and Franklin then signed an undated version of the treaty and burned the previous dated versions.  While they waited for final word on the US-British treaty, King Gustavus sent back word that he would agree to add four articles from the American treaty to the Swedish one. 

Franklin and Cruetz then added in these new articles and signed the documents on March 5.  They were still waiting to hear about the US-British treaty, but were in a rush to complete their work.  So they dated the documents April 3, 1783.  Sweden ratified the treaty on May 23 and Congress on September 25.  The ratifications were then exchanged in Paris on February 6, 1784.