#230-40 – 1893 Columbians, 11 stamps

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- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 2-4 business days.i$1,199.00
$1,199.00
- Used Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 2-4 business days.i$285.00
$285.00
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- MM420245x30mm 50 Horizontal Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
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$3.50
1¢ to 50¢
1893 Columbians
 
The Columbians are among the most desirable of all U.S. stamps. Now you can get the 1¢ to 50¢ denominations – a total of eleven stamps – at significant savings. 
 
As you might expect of stamps over 100 years old, each will have a small flaw. These minor imperfections save you money without detracting from the stamp’s desirability or collectability.
 
Let’s learn more about each stamp…
 
1¢ Columbus in Sight of Land:  This is the first in a series of stamps commemorating the 400th anniversary of Columbus’ discovery of the New World.  The illustration shows Columbus sighting land.  However, history tells us that a sailor on the Pinta was actually the first person to sight land on Columbus’ maiden voyage.

2¢ Landing of Columbus:  This stamp shows Columbus coming ashore at Guanahani (San Salvador) in the West Indies.  He claimed the land in the name of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain.  And so certain was Columbus that he was in India, he called the natives “Indians.”  A popular error known as the “Broken Hat” variety occurred during the printing of this stamp – when a break developed in the printing press’s transfer roll.  The flaw caused a piece to be missing from the hat of the foreground figure to the left of Columbus.

3¢ Flagship of Columbus:  The Santa Maria was the flagship of Columbus.  It was the largest vessel in his small fleet (measuring 117 feet in length as opposed to the 50-foot length of the Nina and the Pinta), and it was the one on which Columbus sailed.

4¢ Fleet of Columbus:  Columbus set forth on his journey with three ships, and each one played a significant part in the story of Columbus’ discovery.  It was from the Pinta that land was first sighted.  While exploring the islands, the flagship Santa Maria was run aground in strong winds and was totally disabled.  Forced to sail on the Nina, Columbus feared he would never make it back to Spain because of severe weather.  He wrote down the story of his discovery and threw it over the side.  He was determined that the world would know his story even if he died before reaching Spain.
 
5¢ Columbus Soliciting Aid of Isabella:  This stamp shows Columbus before the queen – seeking support for his grand plans to sail across the Atlantic Ocean.  The king and queen did eventually support him.  However, they first had Columbus investigated by a special committee, and this investigation delayed his maiden voyage for four years.
 
6¢ Columbus Welcomed at Barcelona:  Upon his return to Spain, Columbus was instructed to go to Barcelona where the court of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella was sitting.  When he entered, the king and queen arose and bestowed many honors and privileges upon him.  This shocked the court, because such honors were meant only for royalty.  And many believed Columbus to be an ordinary seeker of fortune.
 
8¢ Columbus Restored to Favor:  When Columbus returned to the New World the second time, he began to set up new colonies.  He ruled with a firm hand, and he punished those who did not obey his requests.  Many of his own men objected to his harsh ways.  Columbus was ordered to return to Spain.  He was quickly forgiven, however, because the king and queen were anxious to send him on another voyage.
 
10¢ Columbus Presenting Natives:  Columbus wanted to prove to those in Spain that he had reached a new land.  In order to do that, he forcibly removed some natives from the Bahaman Islands and took them back to Spain with him.  Although he had established a fragile friendship, that relationship was quickly ended.  The natives compared Columbus and his men to the cannibals who raided their islands and kidnapped their people!

15¢ Columbus Announcing His Discovery:  When Columbus was summoned to Barcelona to tell the King and Queen what he had found during his voyage, they were impressed.  They did not want Portugal to launch their own ships and discover lands that could belong to Spain.  They immediately made plans to send Columbus on another voyage.

30¢ Columbus at La Rabida:  In his search for a patron to finance his first voyage, Columbus went to La Rabida, where he met a ship owner named Martin Alonso  Pinson.  Pinson was very supportive of Columbus and his wish to sail west across the ocean.  The two men became partners, and ultimately, Pinzon was the commander of the Pinta during Columbus’ maiden voyage.

50¢ Recall of Columbus:  In the New World, Columbus was ruling with a harsh hand.  Messengers returned to Spain to tell the king and queen of Columbus’ wicked ways. They immediately dispatched an employee of the throne to go to the New World and administer justice.  Columbus refused to obey the court’s order, and he was recalled to Spain.
 
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1¢ to 50¢
1893 Columbians
 
The Columbians are among the most desirable of all U.S. stamps. Now you can get the 1¢ to 50¢ denominations – a total of eleven stamps – at significant savings. 
 
As you might expect of stamps over 100 years old, each will have a small flaw. These minor imperfections save you money without detracting from the stamp’s desirability or collectability.
 
Let’s learn more about each stamp…
 
1¢ Columbus in Sight of Land:  This is the first in a series of stamps commemorating the 400th anniversary of Columbus’ discovery of the New World.  The illustration shows Columbus sighting land.  However, history tells us that a sailor on the Pinta was actually the first person to sight land on Columbus’ maiden voyage.

2¢ Landing of Columbus:  This stamp shows Columbus coming ashore at Guanahani (San Salvador) in the West Indies.  He claimed the land in the name of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella of Spain.  And so certain was Columbus that he was in India, he called the natives “Indians.”  A popular error known as the “Broken Hat” variety occurred during the printing of this stamp – when a break developed in the printing press’s transfer roll.  The flaw caused a piece to be missing from the hat of the foreground figure to the left of Columbus.

3¢ Flagship of Columbus:  The Santa Maria was the flagship of Columbus.  It was the largest vessel in his small fleet (measuring 117 feet in length as opposed to the 50-foot length of the Nina and the Pinta), and it was the one on which Columbus sailed.

4¢ Fleet of Columbus:  Columbus set forth on his journey with three ships, and each one played a significant part in the story of Columbus’ discovery.  It was from the Pinta that land was first sighted.  While exploring the islands, the flagship Santa Maria was run aground in strong winds and was totally disabled.  Forced to sail on the Nina, Columbus feared he would never make it back to Spain because of severe weather.  He wrote down the story of his discovery and threw it over the side.  He was determined that the world would know his story even if he died before reaching Spain.
 
5¢ Columbus Soliciting Aid of Isabella:  This stamp shows Columbus before the queen – seeking support for his grand plans to sail across the Atlantic Ocean.  The king and queen did eventually support him.  However, they first had Columbus investigated by a special committee, and this investigation delayed his maiden voyage for four years.
 
6¢ Columbus Welcomed at Barcelona:  Upon his return to Spain, Columbus was instructed to go to Barcelona where the court of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella was sitting.  When he entered, the king and queen arose and bestowed many honors and privileges upon him.  This shocked the court, because such honors were meant only for royalty.  And many believed Columbus to be an ordinary seeker of fortune.
 
8¢ Columbus Restored to Favor:  When Columbus returned to the New World the second time, he began to set up new colonies.  He ruled with a firm hand, and he punished those who did not obey his requests.  Many of his own men objected to his harsh ways.  Columbus was ordered to return to Spain.  He was quickly forgiven, however, because the king and queen were anxious to send him on another voyage.
 
10¢ Columbus Presenting Natives:  Columbus wanted to prove to those in Spain that he had reached a new land.  In order to do that, he forcibly removed some natives from the Bahaman Islands and took them back to Spain with him.  Although he had established a fragile friendship, that relationship was quickly ended.  The natives compared Columbus and his men to the cannibals who raided their islands and kidnapped their people!

15¢ Columbus Announcing His Discovery:  When Columbus was summoned to Barcelona to tell the King and Queen what he had found during his voyage, they were impressed.  They did not want Portugal to launch their own ships and discover lands that could belong to Spain.  They immediately made plans to send Columbus on another voyage.

30¢ Columbus at La Rabida:  In his search for a patron to finance his first voyage, Columbus went to La Rabida, where he met a ship owner named Martin Alonso  Pinson.  Pinson was very supportive of Columbus and his wish to sail west across the ocean.  The two men became partners, and ultimately, Pinzon was the commander of the Pinta during Columbus’ maiden voyage.

50¢ Recall of Columbus:  In the New World, Columbus was ruling with a harsh hand.  Messengers returned to Spain to tell the king and queen of Columbus’ wicked ways. They immediately dispatched an employee of the throne to go to the New World and administer justice.  Columbus refused to obey the court’s order, and he was recalled to Spain.