#2344 – 1987 25c Bicentenary Statehood: New Hampshire

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$1.50
$1.50
- Used Single Stamp(s)
Ships in 1-2 business days.i$0.25
$0.25
6 More - Click Here
Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM50230x45mm 50 Vertical Black Split-Back Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
- MM420330x45mm 50 Vertical Clear Bottom-Weld Mounts
Ships in 1-2 business days.i
$3.50
$3.50
 
U.S. #2344
25¢ New Hampshire
1987-90 Bicentenary Statehood Series
 
Issue Date: June 21, 1988
City: Concord, NH
Quantity: 153,295,000
Printed By: American Bank Note Co
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
11
Color: Multicolored
 
From 1987-1990, the U.S. Postal Service issued a set of stamps commemorating the signing of the Constitution by representatives of the first 13 Colonies.  The stamps were issued in the 200th year after each state approved the Constitution, in the order each colony became a state.  Every stamp shows traditional symbols of the state.   
 
On June 21, 1788, New Hampshire became the ninth and deciding state to ratify the Constitution of the United States. This made the small New England state "the state that made us a nation".
 

The Old Man Of The Mountain

On May 3, 2003, the Old Man of the Mountain rock formation in New Hampshire collapsed. 

The 40-foot-tall “face” in New Hampshire’s White Mountains was composed of Conway red granite.  Five ledges formed its appearance.  When lined up, these ledges gave the appearance of an old man looking to the east.  According to geologists, a combination of the glacial movement and the forces of seasonal freezing sculpted the face.  It is believed the “old man” had existed for as long as 10,000 years.

Francis Whitcomb and Luke Brooks of the Franconia surveying team reportedly first discovered the formation in 1805.  It quickly became a major tourist attraction, in part due to Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short story, “The Great Stone Face,” which called it “a work of Nature in her mood of majestic playfulness.”

Statesman Daniel Webster also contributed to it’s notoriety, saying of the formation,  “Men hang out their signs indicative of their respective trades; shoe makers hang out a gigantic shoe; jewelers a monster watch, and the dentist hangs out a gold tooth; but up in the Mountains of New Hampshire, God Almighty has hung out a sign to show that there He makes men.”  Over the years it was known by many names, including The Great Stone Face, the Profile, and The Old Man.

In 1906, Reverend Guy Roberts of Massachusetts was among the first people to publicize the formation’s deterioration.  Over the years, the freezing and thawing of ice in the granite ridges combined with vibration from nearby traffic to open gaps in the figure’s forehead. 

During the 1920s, the crack was contained by chains to prevent it from widening.  The state legislature later provided $25,000 to keep the formation intact.  Upkeep was performed every summer.  In 1945, the Stone Face was made the official state emblem of New Hampshire and would eventually be featured on the state’s license plate, state route signs, and quarter.

In spite of all the preservation efforts, the formation collapsed on May 3, 2003.  The people of New Hampshire were saddened by the loss of the Great Stone Face, leaving flowers at its base in memoriam.  Some people suggested adding the profile to the state flag.  Others proposed building a plastic replica, but this idea was rejected.  One year after the collapse, coin-operated viewfinders were installed, allowing visitors to see the cliff as it once was.  A state-sponsored memorial was begun in 2010.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Click here for a photo of the formation after its collapse.

Read More - Click Here


  • 2020 First-Class Forever Stamp - Holiday Delights 2020 First-Class Forever Stamps - Holiday Delights

    In 2020, the United States Postal Service issued a set of 4 new Forever stamps picturing Holiday Delights.  Add these popular stamps to your collection now!

    $4.50- $21.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2019 Giant US Commemorative Collection, 212 mint stamps 2019 Giant US Commemorative Collection of 212 Mint Stamps
    Save time and money with this year-set.  You'll receive every US commemorative stamp with a major Scott number issued in 2019 in one order.  Plus, get the seven mint sheets pictured in our 2019 Heirloom Supplement.  It's the easy way to keep your collection up to date. 
    $219.95
    BUY NOW
  • US Definitive Collection - 650 Used Stamps US Definitive Collection - 650 Used Stamps
    Act now to get an instant collection of 650 used U.S. definitive stamps in one easy order! Definitive stamps are the backbone of the U.S. postal system and essential additions to your collection. Take advantage of this money-saving offer and make your collection grow fast.
    $32.95
    BUY NOW

 

U.S. #2344
25¢ New Hampshire
1987-90 Bicentenary Statehood Series
 
Issue Date: June 21, 1988
City: Concord, NH
Quantity: 153,295,000
Printed By: American Bank Note Co
Printing Method:
Photogravure
Perforations:
11
Color: Multicolored
 
From 1987-1990, the U.S. Postal Service issued a set of stamps commemorating the signing of the Constitution by representatives of the first 13 Colonies.  The stamps were issued in the 200th year after each state approved the Constitution, in the order each colony became a state.  Every stamp shows traditional symbols of the state.   
 
On June 21, 1788, New Hampshire became the ninth and deciding state to ratify the Constitution of the United States. This made the small New England state "the state that made us a nation".
 

The Old Man Of The Mountain

On May 3, 2003, the Old Man of the Mountain rock formation in New Hampshire collapsed. 

The 40-foot-tall “face” in New Hampshire’s White Mountains was composed of Conway red granite.  Five ledges formed its appearance.  When lined up, these ledges gave the appearance of an old man looking to the east.  According to geologists, a combination of the glacial movement and the forces of seasonal freezing sculpted the face.  It is believed the “old man” had existed for as long as 10,000 years.

Francis Whitcomb and Luke Brooks of the Franconia surveying team reportedly first discovered the formation in 1805.  It quickly became a major tourist attraction, in part due to Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short story, “The Great Stone Face,” which called it “a work of Nature in her mood of majestic playfulness.”

Statesman Daniel Webster also contributed to it’s notoriety, saying of the formation,  “Men hang out their signs indicative of their respective trades; shoe makers hang out a gigantic shoe; jewelers a monster watch, and the dentist hangs out a gold tooth; but up in the Mountains of New Hampshire, God Almighty has hung out a sign to show that there He makes men.”  Over the years it was known by many names, including The Great Stone Face, the Profile, and The Old Man.

In 1906, Reverend Guy Roberts of Massachusetts was among the first people to publicize the formation’s deterioration.  Over the years, the freezing and thawing of ice in the granite ridges combined with vibration from nearby traffic to open gaps in the figure’s forehead. 

During the 1920s, the crack was contained by chains to prevent it from widening.  The state legislature later provided $25,000 to keep the formation intact.  Upkeep was performed every summer.  In 1945, the Stone Face was made the official state emblem of New Hampshire and would eventually be featured on the state’s license plate, state route signs, and quarter.

In spite of all the preservation efforts, the formation collapsed on May 3, 2003.  The people of New Hampshire were saddened by the loss of the Great Stone Face, leaving flowers at its base in memoriam.  Some people suggested adding the profile to the state flag.  Others proposed building a plastic replica, but this idea was rejected.  One year after the collapse, coin-operated viewfinders were installed, allowing visitors to see the cliff as it once was.  A state-sponsored memorial was begun in 2010.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Click here for a photo of the formation after its collapse.