#2838c – 1994 29c WWII, Allies in Normandy, D-Day

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$3.75
$3.75
3 More - Click Here
U.S. #2838c
1994 29¢ D-Day
World War II – 1944: Road to Victory
 
Issue Date: June 6, 1994
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 6,030,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations:
10.9
Color: Multicolored
 
Early in 1942 the U.S. and Great Britain began making plans for a large-scale invasion across the English Channel. Code-named “Operation Overlord,” the invasion was to be commanded by General Dwight D. Eisenhower who was ordered: “You will enter the continent of Europe and, in conjunction with the other United Nations, undertake operations aimed at the heart of Germany and the destruction of her armed forces.”
 
Scheduled for June 5th, rough seas forced Eisenhower to postpone the invasion. Early on June 6th, the largest amphibious force ever seen stormed the Atlantic Wall of which Hitler had boasted, “No power on earth can drive us out of this region against our will.” At 3:32 A.M. New York time, a radio news flash announced Eisenhower’s Order of the Day: “The tide has turned. The free men of the world are marching together to victory.”
 
Minesweepers had gone ahead to clear the water, and as the invasion armada headed across the channel, paratroopers and glider units dropped behind enemy lines. At dawn battleships opened fire and troops stormed ashore. Taken by surprise, the Germans fought back fiercely. Troops at Omaha Beach came under heavy fire and barely managed to stay ashore, but by nightfall all five Allied beaches had been secured.
Read More - Click Here


  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2018 First-Class Forever Stamp - The Art of Magic souvenir sheet of 3 Get The 2018 Art Of Magic Souvenir Sheet with Special Animation Effect

    Own a mint souvenir sheet of three Art of Magic stamps featuring a white rabbit seeming to appear and disappear out of a black top hat.  The special animation effect was created using lenticular printing and makes this souvenir sheet a fun addition to your collection.  Get yours now.

    $5.00
    BUY NOW
  • US Stamp Starter Kit Give Your Grandchildren the Gift of Stamp Collecting

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S. stamps that are easy to find and buy.  As a bonus, we’ll include 100 used U.S. stamps, 1,000 hinges for attaching stamps in their album, and Mystic’s Guide to Stamp Collecting – all for FREE.  It’s a terrific value.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #2838c
1994 29¢ D-Day
World War II – 1944: Road to Victory
 
Issue Date: June 6, 1994
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 6,030,000
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations:
10.9
Color: Multicolored
 
Early in 1942 the U.S. and Great Britain began making plans for a large-scale invasion across the English Channel. Code-named “Operation Overlord,” the invasion was to be commanded by General Dwight D. Eisenhower who was ordered: “You will enter the continent of Europe and, in conjunction with the other United Nations, undertake operations aimed at the heart of Germany and the destruction of her armed forces.”
 
Scheduled for June 5th, rough seas forced Eisenhower to postpone the invasion. Early on June 6th, the largest amphibious force ever seen stormed the Atlantic Wall of which Hitler had boasted, “No power on earth can drive us out of this region against our will.” At 3:32 A.M. New York time, a radio news flash announced Eisenhower’s Order of the Day: “The tide has turned. The free men of the world are marching together to victory.”
 
Minesweepers had gone ahead to clear the water, and as the invasion armada headed across the channel, paratroopers and glider units dropped behind enemy lines. At dawn battleships opened fire and troops stormed ashore. Taken by surprise, the Germans fought back fiercely. Troops at Omaha Beach came under heavy fire and barely managed to stay ashore, but by nightfall all five Allied beaches had been secured.