#2981i – 1995 32c World War II: News of Victory Hits Home

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U.S. #2981i
1995 32¢ Sailor and Nurse Kissing
WWII – 1945: Victory at Last

Issue Date: September 2, 1995
City: Honolulu, HI
Quantity: 5,000,000 panes of 20
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations:
11.1
Color: Multicolored
 
The fifth and final installment of the World War II series commemorates the 50th anniversary of the war's final year. Titled "1945: Victory at Last," these 10 stamps chronicle the events leading to Germany's surrender, the Japanese surrender, and ultimately the Allied victory. Nearly 300,000 American service personnel lost their lives between 1941 and 1945.
 
Sailor and Nurse Kissing
The people of Japan heard the voice of their emperor for the first time ever when he announced, in a radio broadcast, that the war was over. The Japanese were devastated – most responded by openly weeping. America’s response to the news was one of pure joy.
 
V-E Day celebrations had been stifled by the sobering realization that the war in the Pacific was still to be fought. But with the Japanese surrender, the war was truly over. Whistles blew, church bells rang, crowds filled the streets, employees left work early, and strangers embraced as the nation erupted in celebration.
 
Japan surrendered on August 14th, but the official ceremony was held September 2nd aboard the U.S. battleship Missouri anchored in Tokyo Bay. Two Japanese officials, as well as representatives from the U.S., Great Britain, China, Russia, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Canada, France, and Australia signed the surrender document. September 2nd has been celebrated as V-J Day or Victory over Japan Day ever since.
 
Excitement subsided as serious speculation about the future began. People everywhere wanted to be sure the world would never suffer through such a calamity again. This hope was expressed on October 24, 1945, when the United Nations was signed into existence.
 
 
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U.S. #2981i
1995 32¢ Sailor and Nurse Kissing
WWII – 1945: Victory at Last

Issue Date: September 2, 1995
City: Honolulu, HI
Quantity: 5,000,000 panes of 20
Printed By: Bureau of Engraving and Printing
Printing Method:
Lithographed and engraved
Perforations:
11.1
Color: Multicolored
 
The fifth and final installment of the World War II series commemorates the 50th anniversary of the war's final year. Titled "1945: Victory at Last," these 10 stamps chronicle the events leading to Germany's surrender, the Japanese surrender, and ultimately the Allied victory. Nearly 300,000 American service personnel lost their lives between 1941 and 1945.
 
Sailor and Nurse Kissing
The people of Japan heard the voice of their emperor for the first time ever when he announced, in a radio broadcast, that the war was over. The Japanese were devastated – most responded by openly weeping. America’s response to the news was one of pure joy.
 
V-E Day celebrations had been stifled by the sobering realization that the war in the Pacific was still to be fought. But with the Japanese surrender, the war was truly over. Whistles blew, church bells rang, crowds filled the streets, employees left work early, and strangers embraced as the nation erupted in celebration.
 
Japan surrendered on August 14th, but the official ceremony was held September 2nd aboard the U.S. battleship Missouri anchored in Tokyo Bay. Two Japanese officials, as well as representatives from the U.S., Great Britain, China, Russia, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Canada, France, and Australia signed the surrender document. September 2nd has been celebrated as V-J Day or Victory over Japan Day ever since.
 
Excitement subsided as serious speculation about the future began. People everywhere wanted to be sure the world would never suffer through such a calamity again. This hope was expressed on October 24, 1945, when the United Nations was signed into existence.