#3188o – 1999 33c Celebrate the Century - 1960s: The Beatles

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U.S. #3188o
33¢ The Beatles “Yellow Submarine”
Celebrate the Century – 1960s
 
Issue Date: September 17, 1999
City: Green Bay, WI
Quantity: 8,000,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 

Introducing… The Beatles Controversy 

On July 22, 1963, the first U.S. Beatles album was planned for release, but was delayed for several months due to a shakeup at the record company.

The Beatles began with John Lennon, who was raised on Penny Lane in Liverpool, England. He was a teenager when rock greats Elvis Presley, Little Richard, and Chuck Berry became stars in America. Influenced by their music, Lennon formed his first band, the Quarrymen. He invited Paul McCartney to join the group, forming one of the most creative musical duos in pop history.

Soon George Harrison became a member of the Quarrymen, along with drummer Pete Best and bassist Stu Sutcliffe. In 1961, Liverpool record store owner Brian Epstein caught on to the Beatles’ popularity and became their manager. By 1962, the band – now called the Beatles – had dropped Best and Sutcliffe and added drummer Richard Starkey, better known as Ringo Starr. They landed a contract with Electrical and Mechanical Industries (EMI), and had several hits in Europe.

The Beatles released their first album on March 22, 1963 – Please Please Me. It entered the U.K. charts on April 6 and spent 30 weeks at number one. Part of the deal with EMI included an American release. At one point, Vee-Jay Records planned to simply release the 14-song Please Please Me as it had been issued in the United Kingdom. However, at the time most American albums had just 12 songs, so they decided to drop “Please Please Me” and “Ask Me Why,” which had previously been released as a single.

Preparations for creating the album, now titled Introducing… The Beatles, began in late June and the first albums were pressed shortly after. The album was supposed to be released on July 22, 1963. However, Ewart Abner, president of Vee-Jay Records was forced to resign after it had been discovered that he used company funds to cover his gambling debts. In the wake of the scandal, the label opted to cancel the release of their album as well as those of Frank Ifield and Alma Cogan.

The record company put the Beatles on the back burner for several months, dealing with other, more profitable albums first. Then in December they rushed to release the single, “I Want to Hold Your Hand” when they discovered that Capitol Records was planning an all-out promotional campaign for the Beatles. With the record company desperate for money, they finally decided to release Introducing… The Beatles, even if it would cause them legal troubles later.

The album was finally released on January 10, 1964. However, the album had included two songs that another record company had rights to, so they had to release another version of the album without them about a month later. The new release of the album reached number two on the Billboard charts and stayed there for nine weeks.

The Beatles arrived in the U.S. in February of 1964, when thousands of screaming fans greeted them at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York City. Their energy, musical abilities, wit, and “mop-tops” made them heroes to American youth. That year, the group’s first of 20 number-one U.S. hits, “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” landed on the charts. And their appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show later that year helped launch “Beatlemania.”

 
The Beatles began with John Lennon, who was raised on Penny Lane in Liverpool, England. He was a teenager when rock greats Elvis Presley, Little Richard, and Chuck Berry became stars in America. Influenced by their music, Lennon formed his first band, the Quarrymen. He invited Paul McCartney to join the group, forming one of the most creative musical duos in pop history.
 
Soon George Harrison became a member of the Quarrymen, along with drummer Pete Best and bassist Stu Sutcliffe. In 1961, Liverpool record store owner Brian Epstein caught on to the Beatles’ popularity and became their manager. By 1962, the band – now called the Beatles – had dropped Best and Sutcliffe and added drummer Richard Starkey, better known as Ringo Starr. They landed a contract with Electrical and Mechanical Industries (EMI), and had several hits in Europe.
 
The Beatles arrived in the U.S. in February of 1964, when thousands of screaming fans greeted them at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York City. Their energy, musical abilities, wit, and “mop-tops” made them heroes to American youth. That year, the group’s first of 20 number-one U.S. hits, “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” landed on the charts. Their appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show” in 1964 helped launch “Beatlemania.”
 
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U.S. #3188o
33¢ The Beatles “Yellow Submarine”
Celebrate the Century – 1960s
 
Issue Date: September 17, 1999
City: Green Bay, WI
Quantity: 8,000,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed, engraved
Perforations:
11.5
Color: Multicolored
 

Introducing… The Beatles Controversy 

On July 22, 1963, the first U.S. Beatles album was planned for release, but was delayed for several months due to a shakeup at the record company.

The Beatles began with John Lennon, who was raised on Penny Lane in Liverpool, England. He was a teenager when rock greats Elvis Presley, Little Richard, and Chuck Berry became stars in America. Influenced by their music, Lennon formed his first band, the Quarrymen. He invited Paul McCartney to join the group, forming one of the most creative musical duos in pop history.

Soon George Harrison became a member of the Quarrymen, along with drummer Pete Best and bassist Stu Sutcliffe. In 1961, Liverpool record store owner Brian Epstein caught on to the Beatles’ popularity and became their manager. By 1962, the band – now called the Beatles – had dropped Best and Sutcliffe and added drummer Richard Starkey, better known as Ringo Starr. They landed a contract with Electrical and Mechanical Industries (EMI), and had several hits in Europe.

The Beatles released their first album on March 22, 1963 – Please Please Me. It entered the U.K. charts on April 6 and spent 30 weeks at number one. Part of the deal with EMI included an American release. At one point, Vee-Jay Records planned to simply release the 14-song Please Please Me as it had been issued in the United Kingdom. However, at the time most American albums had just 12 songs, so they decided to drop “Please Please Me” and “Ask Me Why,” which had previously been released as a single.

Preparations for creating the album, now titled Introducing… The Beatles, began in late June and the first albums were pressed shortly after. The album was supposed to be released on July 22, 1963. However, Ewart Abner, president of Vee-Jay Records was forced to resign after it had been discovered that he used company funds to cover his gambling debts. In the wake of the scandal, the label opted to cancel the release of their album as well as those of Frank Ifield and Alma Cogan.

The record company put the Beatles on the back burner for several months, dealing with other, more profitable albums first. Then in December they rushed to release the single, “I Want to Hold Your Hand” when they discovered that Capitol Records was planning an all-out promotional campaign for the Beatles. With the record company desperate for money, they finally decided to release Introducing… The Beatles, even if it would cause them legal troubles later.

The album was finally released on January 10, 1964. However, the album had included two songs that another record company had rights to, so they had to release another version of the album without them about a month later. The new release of the album reached number two on the Billboard charts and stayed there for nine weeks.

The Beatles arrived in the U.S. in February of 1964, when thousands of screaming fans greeted them at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York City. Their energy, musical abilities, wit, and “mop-tops” made them heroes to American youth. That year, the group’s first of 20 number-one U.S. hits, “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” landed on the charts. And their appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show later that year helped launch “Beatlemania.”

 
The Beatles began with John Lennon, who was raised on Penny Lane in Liverpool, England. He was a teenager when rock greats Elvis Presley, Little Richard, and Chuck Berry became stars in America. Influenced by their music, Lennon formed his first band, the Quarrymen. He invited Paul McCartney to join the group, forming one of the most creative musical duos in pop history.
 
Soon George Harrison became a member of the Quarrymen, along with drummer Pete Best and bassist Stu Sutcliffe. In 1961, Liverpool record store owner Brian Epstein caught on to the Beatles’ popularity and became their manager. By 1962, the band – now called the Beatles – had dropped Best and Sutcliffe and added drummer Richard Starkey, better known as Ringo Starr. They landed a contract with Electrical and Mechanical Industries (EMI), and had several hits in Europe.
 
The Beatles arrived in the U.S. in February of 1964, when thousands of screaming fans greeted them at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York City. Their energy, musical abilities, wit, and “mop-tops” made them heroes to American youth. That year, the group’s first of 20 number-one U.S. hits, “I Want to Hold Your Hand,” landed on the charts. Their appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show” in 1964 helped launch “Beatlemania.”