#3390 – 2000 33c Library of Congress

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. iFREE with 270 points!
$1.30
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$0.20
8 More - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
camera Mint Plate Block of 4
Ships in 1 business day. i
$6.50
camera Mystic First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.95
camera Mint Sheet(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$25.00
camera Classic First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$1.75
camera Fleetwood First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.20
camera Silk First Day Cover
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.25
camera Silk First Day Cover (Combination Cover)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$2.95
camera Fleetwood First Day Cover (Plate Block)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.75
Grading Guide

Mounts - Click Here
Condition
Price
Qty
- MM64415 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 46 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-13/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$7.50
- MM50650 Vertical Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 36 x 46 millimeters (1-7/16 x 1-13/16 inches)
Ships in 1 business day. i
$3.50
U.S. #3390
2000 33¢ Library of Congress

Issue Date: April 24, 2000
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 55,000,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11
Color: Multicolored
 
The Library of Congress is America’s oldest federal institution and the largest repository of knowledge in the world. The Library celebrates its 200th birthday on April 24, 2000. The Library’s initial purpose was to serve the research needs of Congress. It has grown into much more. Today, the Library of Congress is an authority on books, maps, photographs, motion pictures, and music.
 
On August 14, 1814, British soldiers burned the U.S. Capitol, and with it, more than 3,000 items the Library had obtained. Congress then accepted an offer by Thomas Jefferson to sell the government his collection of 6,487 books for $23,950. But a faulty chimney flue started a fire that destroyed nearly two-thirds of the Jefferson collection on December 24, 1851. The Library of Congress has tried, with some success, to find copies of the destroyed books.
 
In 1865, Congress enacted the requirement that one copy of every copyrighted “book, pamphlet, map, chart, musical composition, print, engraving, or photo” created in the U.S. be sent to the library. Today, two copies must go to the library, and the U.S. Copyright Office is headquartered there. The Library of Congress is now three buildings: the Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and James Madison Memorial buildings.
Read More - Click Here

  • Get Mystic's exclusive Historic Postage Stamps of the United States album U.S. Stamp Starter Kit – #M11986

    This is a great album to start with because it pictures U.S stamps that are easy to find and buy. Pages illustrated on one side only, high quality paper, every stamp identified with Scott numbers. Includes history of each stamp. Affordable - same design as Mystic's American Heirloom album.

    $14.95
    BUY NOW
  • 3-Volume American Heirloom Album and 200 Used US Stamps – #M8104 3-Volume American Heirloom Album – #M8104

    America's best-selling album. Pictures most every U.S. postage stamp issued 1847-2016, over 5,000 stamps with Scott numbers. Pages filled with stamp history. This album is a great value!

    $49.95
    BUY NOW
  • Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album Premium Hingeless American Heirloom Album – #M11954

    Similar to standard American Heirloom album but includes mounts that are already attached to pages, saving you time and effort. Sturdier pages than American Heirloom. Includes Scott numbers and stamp history. This volume is for stamps issued 1935-1966, over 600 stamps. Higher quality album than Heirloom.

    $99.95
    BUY NOW

U.S. #3390
2000 33¢ Library of Congress

Issue Date: April 24, 2000
City: Washington, DC
Quantity: 55,000,000
Printed By: Ashton-Potter (USA) Ltd
Printing Method:
Lithographed
Perforations:
11
Color: Multicolored
 
The Library of Congress is America’s oldest federal institution and the largest repository of knowledge in the world. The Library celebrates its 200th birthday on April 24, 2000. The Library’s initial purpose was to serve the research needs of Congress. It has grown into much more. Today, the Library of Congress is an authority on books, maps, photographs, motion pictures, and music.
 
On August 14, 1814, British soldiers burned the U.S. Capitol, and with it, more than 3,000 items the Library had obtained. Congress then accepted an offer by Thomas Jefferson to sell the government his collection of 6,487 books for $23,950. But a faulty chimney flue started a fire that destroyed nearly two-thirds of the Jefferson collection on December 24, 1851. The Library of Congress has tried, with some success, to find copies of the destroyed books.
 
In 1865, Congress enacted the requirement that one copy of every copyrighted “book, pamphlet, map, chart, musical composition, print, engraving, or photo” created in the U.S. be sent to the library. Today, two copies must go to the library, and the U.S. Copyright Office is headquartered there. The Library of Congress is now three buildings: the Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and James Madison Memorial buildings.