#5106-25 – 2016 First-Class Forever Stamp - Pets

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U.S. #5106-25
2016 47c Pets, 20 Stamps

 Americans love their pets – in 2015 alone, over 60 billion dollars was spent to purchase and care for them.  In the United States, over 312 million dogs, cats, birds, horses, fish, reptiles and other small animals are kept as pets and companions.

Many people adopt pets for companionship, but there are many other benefits to owning an animal.  Research has shown pets help lower blood pressure and lessen anxiety.  Contrary to what many parents have believed, a growing number of studies suggest children growing up in a home with furred animals have less risk of developing allergies and asthma.  The same studies have found these children also had stronger immune systems. 

Alzheimer’s and dementia patients have fewer outbursts if there are pets in the home.  Children with autism or learning disorders usually interact better with animals, and this behavior can serve as a bridge to connecting with humans.  Dogs in particular are helpful in calming hyperactivity and aggression, as well as stimulating imagination.
 

The Humane Society of the United States

1982 13¢ Kitten and Puppy stamp
US #2025 was issued during the 1982 HSUS annual convention.

The Humane Society of the United States was established on November 22, 1954, in Wilmington, Delaware as the National Humane Society.  It’s the largest animal protection organization in the world with over seven million members.

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) grew out of the International Humane Association, which was founded on October 9, 1877, in Cleveland, Ohio.  That association was formed from the merging of 27 organizations around the country.  They changed their name to the American Humane Association in 1878.  During World War I, they rescued injured horses from battlefields.  In 1940, they became the primary organization that oversees the humane treatment of animals on film and television sets.  (They provide the trademark certification “No Animals Were Harmed,” that appears in the end credits.)

1982 13¢ Kitten and Puppy Colorano Silk Cachet First Day Cover
US #2025 – Colorano Silk Cachet First Day Cover

At the group’s 1954 annual meeting, tensions began to brew.  Members were split on whether to fight legislation that would require shelters to turn over animals to be used for research.  Those who opposed the legislation splintered off and formed the National Humane Society on November 22, 1954, with the goal of eliminating all forms of cruelty and injustice to animals.  Their major concerns were how animals were treated in slaughterhouses and medical research laboratories as well as the rising over-breeding of pets.

1982 13¢ Kitten and Puppy Fleetwood First Day Cover
US #2025 – Fleetwood First Day Cover

When it was first founded, the HSUS only had a staff of four and three of them secured personal loans to cover the society’s expenses.  They quickly produced a leaflet titled, “They Preach Cruelty,” which explained how the rising number of unwanted dogs and cats led to their mistreatment.  They also began printing a bimonthly newsletter in 1955 to promote their activities.  In 1957, the HSUS started creating state branches, and in 1960, local humane societies were permitted to become affiliated if they met certain standards.

1966 5¢ Humane Treatment of Animals stamp
US #1307 was issued for the 100th anniversary of the ASPCA.

From its founding, the HSUS was committed to promoting legislation.  In 1958, they helped get the Humane Methods of Slaughter Act passed, with help from Hubert Humphrey and Lyndon Johnson.  Though they initially opposed it, meatpacking companies eventually discovered that the requirements of the new law lowered employee turnover and drove up profits.

1970 6¢ Wildlife Conservation stamp
US #1392 – The HSUS works on behalf of all animals including wildlife.

The HSUS conducted extensive research into the treatment of animals in scientific laboratories.  Members went to labs and noted the conditions and discovered pets being stolen to sell to research groups.  They brought the situation to the public’s attention with the book Animals in a Research Laboratory and a Life magazine cover story.

 
2021 55¢ Heritage Breeds stamps
US #5583-92 – These stamps honor Heritage breeds, whose breeding stock has been carefully managed to produce animals that are adapted to specific environments for specific purposes.

The public was outraged and flooded the White House with more requests for legislation than those for civil rights and the Vietnam War combined.  These efforts paid off in 1966 with the passage of the Laboratory Animal Welfare Act.  The act oversaw animal supplies and required laboratories to purchase their animals from licensed dealers.  In later years, they promoted programs to end animal testing entirely where possible.

2016 47¢ Pets stamps
US #5106-25 – 2016 Pets Booklet Stamps

Soon after, the HSUS expanded its concerns to include wildlife.  It promoted the 1967 Endangered Species Act, the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act, the 1972 Horse Protection Act, and the 1972 Marine Mammal Protection Act. In 1973, they founded the National Association for the Advancement of Humane Education.  They also developed a magazine and programs for teachers to spread animal compassion to schools.

Over the years, the HSUS has protected animals in rodeos, racing, zoos, and circuses.  They also promoted legislation against dogfighting and cockfighting.  And they developed disaster relief plans to rescue pets in the wake of natural or man-made disasters.   The HSUS has also promoted the spaying and neutering of pets to prevent overcrowding and euthanized animals.  They’ve fought against puppy mills and the use of animals for fashion.  And they’ve launched awareness campaigns such as National Farms Animals Awareness Week, National Dog Bite Prevention Week, and National Animal Shelter Appreciation Week.

Today, the HSUS is headquartered in Washington, DC and is run by 528 employees and 1,520 volunteers.


Pet owners tend to suffer less from depression than those who do not own pets.  Most owners find caring for a pet rewarding, which helps bring meaning and joy to life.  By encouraging us to be playful, laugh, and exercise, pets help us increase our activity level and build stamina.  One study found people with dogs walked 30 minutes more each week than they did previously, and lost weight without dieting.  These activities benefit our pets as well by strengthening bonds, minimizing behavior problems, and keeping them fit and healthy.
 
Value:  47c
Issued: August 2, 2016
First Day City:  Las Vegas, NV
Type of Stamp:  First Class Mail
Printed by:  Ashton Potter Ltd.
Method:  Offset
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  400,000,000
 

ASPCA

On April 10, 1866, Henry Bergh founded the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA).

Animals were regarded as property throughout history, and most laws served to protect people from them rather than prevent animal cruelty.  While in Europe on a diplomatic mission, Bergh was distressed by the cruel treatment against animals that he witnessed. 

On his return trip, Bergh passed through England where he met Lord Harrowby, the president of the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.  Harrowby had a significant impact on Bergh and inspired him to dedicate his life to putting an end to animal cruelty.  He resolved that he would not only create an organization to protect animals, but also that they would have the power to arrest and prosecute those that violated the law. 

After returning to America, Bergh was especially disturbed to witness the cruelty inflicted on New York City’s working horses.  He was determined to change common perceptions of acceptable behavior toward animals.  In one public address he spoke eloquently saying, “This is a matter purely of conscience; it has no perplexing side issues.  It is a moral question in all its aspects.”  At the heart of Bergh’s philosophy was that protecting animals was everyone’s responsibility.  His words moved his audience and encouraged several dignitaries to sign his “Declaration of the Rights of Animals.”

Armed with the support of prominent dignitaries, Bergh lobbied the New York State Legislature to pass a law protecting animals.  The charter given to incorporate the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was passed on April 10, 1866.  Nine days later, New York State passed an anti-cruelty law and granted the ASPCA the authority to enforce it.

Bergh was very involved in the ASPCA’s work.  He was often found in the streets and courtrooms fighting for animal welfare.  He inspected slaughterhouses, helped the police close down dog and rat fighting pits, and spoke at schools and organization meetings.  The society operated the first equestrian ambulance, developed a sling to rescue horses, and supplied fresh drinking water for Manhattan’s horses.

By the time of Bergh’s death in 1888, 37 of 38 states in the Union had enacted anti-cruelty laws.  In the early 1900s, the ASPCAs focus shifted more to small domestic animals such as dogs and cats.  Today, the ASPCA focuses on sheltering abandoned animals, adoption programs, and spaying and neutering advocacy.

Click here for more animal stamps.

Click here for more from the ASPCA website.

Read More - Click Here


U.S. #5106-25
2016 47c Pets, 20 Stamps

 Americans love their pets – in 2015 alone, over 60 billion dollars was spent to purchase and care for them.  In the United States, over 312 million dogs, cats, birds, horses, fish, reptiles and other small animals are kept as pets and companions.

Many people adopt pets for companionship, but there are many other benefits to owning an animal.  Research has shown pets help lower blood pressure and lessen anxiety.  Contrary to what many parents have believed, a growing number of studies suggest children growing up in a home with furred animals have less risk of developing allergies and asthma.  The same studies have found these children also had stronger immune systems. 

Alzheimer’s and dementia patients have fewer outbursts if there are pets in the home.  Children with autism or learning disorders usually interact better with animals, and this behavior can serve as a bridge to connecting with humans.  Dogs in particular are helpful in calming hyperactivity and aggression, as well as stimulating imagination.
 

The Humane Society of the United States

1982 13¢ Kitten and Puppy stamp
US #2025 was issued during the 1982 HSUS annual convention.

The Humane Society of the United States was established on November 22, 1954, in Wilmington, Delaware as the National Humane Society.  It’s the largest animal protection organization in the world with over seven million members.

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) grew out of the International Humane Association, which was founded on October 9, 1877, in Cleveland, Ohio.  That association was formed from the merging of 27 organizations around the country.  They changed their name to the American Humane Association in 1878.  During World War I, they rescued injured horses from battlefields.  In 1940, they became the primary organization that oversees the humane treatment of animals on film and television sets.  (They provide the trademark certification “No Animals Were Harmed,” that appears in the end credits.)

1982 13¢ Kitten and Puppy Colorano Silk Cachet First Day Cover
US #2025 – Colorano Silk Cachet First Day Cover

At the group’s 1954 annual meeting, tensions began to brew.  Members were split on whether to fight legislation that would require shelters to turn over animals to be used for research.  Those who opposed the legislation splintered off and formed the National Humane Society on November 22, 1954, with the goal of eliminating all forms of cruelty and injustice to animals.  Their major concerns were how animals were treated in slaughterhouses and medical research laboratories as well as the rising over-breeding of pets.

1982 13¢ Kitten and Puppy Fleetwood First Day Cover
US #2025 – Fleetwood First Day Cover

When it was first founded, the HSUS only had a staff of four and three of them secured personal loans to cover the society’s expenses.  They quickly produced a leaflet titled, “They Preach Cruelty,” which explained how the rising number of unwanted dogs and cats led to their mistreatment.  They also began printing a bimonthly newsletter in 1955 to promote their activities.  In 1957, the HSUS started creating state branches, and in 1960, local humane societies were permitted to become affiliated if they met certain standards.

1966 5¢ Humane Treatment of Animals stamp
US #1307 was issued for the 100th anniversary of the ASPCA.

From its founding, the HSUS was committed to promoting legislation.  In 1958, they helped get the Humane Methods of Slaughter Act passed, with help from Hubert Humphrey and Lyndon Johnson.  Though they initially opposed it, meatpacking companies eventually discovered that the requirements of the new law lowered employee turnover and drove up profits.

1970 6¢ Wildlife Conservation stamp
US #1392 – The HSUS works on behalf of all animals including wildlife.

The HSUS conducted extensive research into the treatment of animals in scientific laboratories.  Members went to labs and noted the conditions and discovered pets being stolen to sell to research groups.  They brought the situation to the public’s attention with the book Animals in a Research Laboratory and a Life magazine cover story.

 
2021 55¢ Heritage Breeds stamps
US #5583-92 – These stamps honor Heritage breeds, whose breeding stock has been carefully managed to produce animals that are adapted to specific environments for specific purposes.

The public was outraged and flooded the White House with more requests for legislation than those for civil rights and the Vietnam War combined.  These efforts paid off in 1966 with the passage of the Laboratory Animal Welfare Act.  The act oversaw animal supplies and required laboratories to purchase their animals from licensed dealers.  In later years, they promoted programs to end animal testing entirely where possible.

2016 47¢ Pets stamps
US #5106-25 – 2016 Pets Booklet Stamps

Soon after, the HSUS expanded its concerns to include wildlife.  It promoted the 1967 Endangered Species Act, the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act, the 1972 Horse Protection Act, and the 1972 Marine Mammal Protection Act. In 1973, they founded the National Association for the Advancement of Humane Education.  They also developed a magazine and programs for teachers to spread animal compassion to schools.

Over the years, the HSUS has protected animals in rodeos, racing, zoos, and circuses.  They also promoted legislation against dogfighting and cockfighting.  And they developed disaster relief plans to rescue pets in the wake of natural or man-made disasters.   The HSUS has also promoted the spaying and neutering of pets to prevent overcrowding and euthanized animals.  They’ve fought against puppy mills and the use of animals for fashion.  And they’ve launched awareness campaigns such as National Farms Animals Awareness Week, National Dog Bite Prevention Week, and National Animal Shelter Appreciation Week.

Today, the HSUS is headquartered in Washington, DC and is run by 528 employees and 1,520 volunteers.


Pet owners tend to suffer less from depression than those who do not own pets.  Most owners find caring for a pet rewarding, which helps bring meaning and joy to life.  By encouraging us to be playful, laugh, and exercise, pets help us increase our activity level and build stamina.  One study found people with dogs walked 30 minutes more each week than they did previously, and lost weight without dieting.  These activities benefit our pets as well by strengthening bonds, minimizing behavior problems, and keeping them fit and healthy.
 
Value:  47c
Issued: August 2, 2016
First Day City:  Las Vegas, NV
Type of Stamp:  First Class Mail
Printed by:  Ashton Potter Ltd.
Method:  Offset
Self-Adhesive
Quantity Printed:  400,000,000
 

ASPCA

On April 10, 1866, Henry Bergh founded the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA).

Animals were regarded as property throughout history, and most laws served to protect people from them rather than prevent animal cruelty.  While in Europe on a diplomatic mission, Bergh was distressed by the cruel treatment against animals that he witnessed. 

On his return trip, Bergh passed through England where he met Lord Harrowby, the president of the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.  Harrowby had a significant impact on Bergh and inspired him to dedicate his life to putting an end to animal cruelty.  He resolved that he would not only create an organization to protect animals, but also that they would have the power to arrest and prosecute those that violated the law. 

After returning to America, Bergh was especially disturbed to witness the cruelty inflicted on New York City’s working horses.  He was determined to change common perceptions of acceptable behavior toward animals.  In one public address he spoke eloquently saying, “This is a matter purely of conscience; it has no perplexing side issues.  It is a moral question in all its aspects.”  At the heart of Bergh’s philosophy was that protecting animals was everyone’s responsibility.  His words moved his audience and encouraged several dignitaries to sign his “Declaration of the Rights of Animals.”

Armed with the support of prominent dignitaries, Bergh lobbied the New York State Legislature to pass a law protecting animals.  The charter given to incorporate the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals was passed on April 10, 1866.  Nine days later, New York State passed an anti-cruelty law and granted the ASPCA the authority to enforce it.

Bergh was very involved in the ASPCA’s work.  He was often found in the streets and courtrooms fighting for animal welfare.  He inspected slaughterhouses, helped the police close down dog and rat fighting pits, and spoke at schools and organization meetings.  The society operated the first equestrian ambulance, developed a sling to rescue horses, and supplied fresh drinking water for Manhattan’s horses.

By the time of Bergh’s death in 1888, 37 of 38 states in the Union had enacted anti-cruelty laws.  In the early 1900s, the ASPCAs focus shifted more to small domestic animals such as dogs and cats.  Today, the ASPCA focuses on sheltering abandoned animals, adoption programs, and spaying and neutering advocacy.

Click here for more animal stamps.

Click here for more from the ASPCA website.