#569 – 1923 30c Buffalo, olive brown

Condition
Price
Qty
- Mint Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$55.00
$55.00
- Used Stamp(s)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.60
$0.60
- Unused Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i$33.00
$33.00
- Used Stamp (small flaws)
Ships in 1 business day. i$0.45
$0.45
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Condition
Price
Qty
- MM63425 Horizontal Strip Mounts, Black, Split-back, 215 x 27 millimeters (8-7/16 x 1-1/16 inches)
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$7.50
$7.50
- MM50450 Horizontal Mounts, Black, Split-back, Pre-cut, 30 x 27 millimeters (1-3/16 x 1 inch)
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$2.95
$2.95
- MM4208Mystic Clear Mount 30x27mm - 50 precut mounts
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$1.95
$1.95

U.S. #569
Series of 1922-25
30¢ Buffalo


Issue Date:
March 20, 1923
First City: Washington, DC
Issue Quantity: 282,608,477

Wheels of Progress

In 1847, when the printing presses first began to move, they didn’t roll – they “stamped” in a process known as flat plate printing.  The Regular Series of 1922 was the last to be printed by flat plate press, after which stamps were produced by rotary press printing.

 

By 1926, all denominations up to 10¢ – except the new ½¢ – were printed by rotary press.  For a while, $1 to $5 issues were done on flat plate press due to smaller demand.

 

This stamp didn't serve any special rate but was used on packages that required more than thirty cents postage. It's the only stamp in the series that doesn't have a title plate beneath the central design, since most people would know it was a picture of a buffalo.

 

America’s Buffalo

The Series of 1922-25 30¢ stamp pictures a buffalo.  Vast herds of buffalo, or bison, once roamed over North America.  In 1850, it’s estimated there were 20 million buffalo in the United States.  However, by 1889, only 551 could be found in the nation.  Since that time, great efforts have been made to preserve this impressive species.  Today, more than 65,000 buffalo inhabit U.S. and Canadian reserves.

The National Bison Range is part of the National Wildlife Refuge System.  Up to 450 buffalo live on the range’s 18,500 acres.  National Bison Range is also home to elk, deer, pronghorn, black bear, coyote, ground squirrels, and many species of birds, including eagles.  Established in 1908, it is one of the oldest wildlife refuges in America.  

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  • 450 Black Mounts, Split-back, containing one pack each of MM501 through MM509 450 Archival-Quality Mystic Mounts

    Mystic mounts are the best way to keep your stamps safe and looking great for years to come.  Stamps are held securely in place against a black background – making the colors "pop" and adding definition to perforations.  With this mount package you'll get 50 split-back mounts of each size collectors most commonly use.

    $29.50
    BUY NOW
  • 2017 Commemorative Year Set 2017 U.S. Commemorative Year Set

    Get every US commemorative stamp issued in 2017.  Each stamp showcases important history, people, and events from American culture.  With this set you'll receive stamps from popular series like Lunar New Year and Love.  Plus you'll receive the Nebraska and Mississippi Statehood stamps, Dorothy Height, John F. Kennedy, and more.  It's the convenient and affordable way to keep your collection up to date.

    $31.95- $55.95
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  • 1847 5¢ Benjamin Franklin, red-brown, thin bluish wove paper, imperforate U.S. #1 - First U.S. Postage Stamp

    On July 1, 1847, the first US postage stamps went on sale.  The 5¢ issue of 1847 (US #1) features a portrait of Benjamin Franklin, the man responsible for organizing America's postal service back in the 1700s.  Postal clerks used scissors to cut the stamps from sheets, as perforations weren't in use yet.  Today, US #1 is a valued piece of American postal history and a lucky find in any condition.

    $450.00- $7,395.00
    BUY NOW

U.S. #569
Series of 1922-25
30¢ Buffalo


Issue Date:
March 20, 1923
First City: Washington, DC
Issue Quantity: 282,608,477

Wheels of Progress

In 1847, when the printing presses first began to move, they didn’t roll – they “stamped” in a process known as flat plate printing.  The Regular Series of 1922 was the last to be printed by flat plate press, after which stamps were produced by rotary press printing.

 

By 1926, all denominations up to 10¢ – except the new ½¢ – were printed by rotary press.  For a while, $1 to $5 issues were done on flat plate press due to smaller demand.

 

This stamp didn't serve any special rate but was used on packages that required more than thirty cents postage. It's the only stamp in the series that doesn't have a title plate beneath the central design, since most people would know it was a picture of a buffalo.

 

America’s Buffalo

The Series of 1922-25 30¢ stamp pictures a buffalo.  Vast herds of buffalo, or bison, once roamed over North America.  In 1850, it’s estimated there were 20 million buffalo in the United States.  However, by 1889, only 551 could be found in the nation.  Since that time, great efforts have been made to preserve this impressive species.  Today, more than 65,000 buffalo inhabit U.S. and Canadian reserves.

The National Bison Range is part of the National Wildlife Refuge System.  Up to 450 buffalo live on the range’s 18,500 acres.  National Bison Range is also home to elk, deer, pronghorn, black bear, coyote, ground squirrels, and many species of birds, including eagles.  Established in 1908, it is one of the oldest wildlife refuges in America.