#629 – 1926 2c Battle of White Plains

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U.S. #629
1926 Hamilton’s Battery
2¢ Battle of White Plains
 

Issue Date:
October 18, 1926
First City: White Plains, NY; New York, NY, and Washington, DC
Issue Quantity: 40,639,485
 
Hamilton’s Battery
U.S. #629 commemorates the Battle of White Plains, a Revolutionary War battle fought on October 28, 1776. The design is entitled “Hamilton’s Battery” in honor of Alexander Hamilton, an outstanding artillery commander, and his men. Hamilton later served as the first Secretary of the U.S. Treasury
 
Battle of White Plains
Following a string of British victories, George Washington’s Continental Army was forced to evacuate New York City and lower Manhattan. British forces and Hessian mercenaries serving under General William Howe followed as Washington moved his troops north.
 
The two armies met at the Battle of White Plains on October 28, 1776. After a day of stiff resistance, Washington’s troops were forced to retreat north. Alexander Hamilton positioned his canon strategically and held a large Hessian contingent at bay to allow an orderly retreat. A second German unit outflanked Washington’s men, trapping them between Howe and the Hessians. However, Howe didn’t advance and lost the opportunity to destroy Washington’s army. 
 
As night fell, a powerful storm moved through the region. Howe ordered his troops to set up camp and artillery batteries. After two days of soaking rain and inactivity, Washington’s men slipped away during the night.
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U.S. #629
1926 Hamilton’s Battery
2¢ Battle of White Plains
 

Issue Date:
October 18, 1926
First City: White Plains, NY; New York, NY, and Washington, DC
Issue Quantity: 40,639,485
 
Hamilton’s Battery
U.S. #629 commemorates the Battle of White Plains, a Revolutionary War battle fought on October 28, 1776. The design is entitled “Hamilton’s Battery” in honor of Alexander Hamilton, an outstanding artillery commander, and his men. Hamilton later served as the first Secretary of the U.S. Treasury
 
Battle of White Plains
Following a string of British victories, George Washington’s Continental Army was forced to evacuate New York City and lower Manhattan. British forces and Hessian mercenaries serving under General William Howe followed as Washington moved his troops north.
 
The two armies met at the Battle of White Plains on October 28, 1776. After a day of stiff resistance, Washington’s troops were forced to retreat north. Alexander Hamilton positioned his canon strategically and held a large Hessian contingent at bay to allow an orderly retreat. A second German unit outflanked Washington’s men, trapping them between Howe and the Hessians. However, Howe didn’t advance and lost the opportunity to destroy Washington’s army. 
 
As night fell, a powerful storm moved through the region. Howe ordered his troops to set up camp and artillery batteries. After two days of soaking rain and inactivity, Washington’s men slipped away during the night.